Specific nouns and modifiers

1,442 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,442
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Specific nouns and modifiers

  1. 1. Specific Nouns and Modifiers Sell the Sizzle
  2. 2. Concrete, Specific Nouns• When a sentence contains specific, identifiable characters, the reader can visualize and “buy into” the image. • An old car drove down the road. − Verses • A dented, badly rusted, metallic blue Dodge minivan limped down the road.
  3. 3. Specific Modifiers• Choose Peppers Hot, sweet, red, jalapeño modifiers (adjectives and Words Whispered, shouted, soft adjective phrases) that Stove Wood- burning, hot, directly appeal filthy to the five Peaches Unripe, sweet, fuzzy senses. Skin Oily, pitted, velvet
  4. 4. Finding the Right Word• For goodness sake, use a dictionary. There are 176 entries for the word run—could you be more specific? • On-line • Unabridged or abridged
  5. 5. Finding the Right Word• Thesaurus comes from the Greek word for treasure—use one of these, too! • Make sure the word carries the meaning you want • On-line and hard copy • Antonyms • Shift F7
  6. 6. Denotation• What is the exact meaning of the word? • Bread • a usually baked and leavened food made of a mixture whose basic constituent is flour or meal (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)
  7. 7. Connotation• What are all the “things” associated with the word? • Bread • Cash • Bread and butter • Give us our daily bread • Bread of life • Put bread on the table • What are the connotations of liberal and conservative?
  8. 8. Idioms• Widely accepted speech patterns: • Why do we ride IN a car but ON a train? • Why do we TAKE a picture but MAKE a recording?• Phrasal verbs-a combination of a preposition and a verb that have meaning different than the lone verb. Consider the following: • How did this COME ABOUT? • When did the question COME UP. • I thought things would COME OUT all right. • I was unconscious, but I soon CAME TO.• Trust your ear- • Second language learners, consult a dictionary or a native speaker.
  9. 9. Slang and Jargon• Slang-informal language unique to groups. • lol, cool, duh, like, awesome, just • Use sparingly in academic writing.• Jargon-technical language usually associated with certain fields of study. • Know your audience and use accordingly.
  10. 10. Slang and Jargon• Slang-informal language unique to groups. • lol, cool, duh, like, awesome, just • Use sparingly in academic writing.• Jargon-technical language usually associated with certain fields of study. • Know your audience and use accordingly.

×