TEACHING TIPS AND   TECHNOLOGIES FORREACHING NET GENERATION        STUDENTS
WHO ARE THEY?                        Generation                           Y       Millennials                   Nexters   ...
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW                                           “Technology” They     They are                        mean...
MINDSET LIST FOR 2015 GRADS (18 IN FALL 2011)                             As they’ve grown up on                          ...
BEFORE WE START…These teaching techniques are positive for   all students, net generation or not.
1. ACTIVE LEARNINGProblem-based                  Hands-on   learning                  investigation             Switch lea...
1.1 ACTIVE LEARNING     TECHNOLOGY PollEverywhere.com
1.2 ACTIVE LEARNING     TECHNOLOGYCreateDebate.com
1.3 ACTIVE LEARNING                TECHNOLOGY            Games         Logic games Simulation    BoardMMORPG           onl...
2. RELEVANCE   Why does it    matter?Connections to the  larger world   Just-in-time     learning
2.1 RELEVANCE           TECHNOLOGY                  Skype             Bring in an expertSkype Q & A chat with animation ar...
2.2 RELEVANCE                 TECHNOLOGYAppropriate use of technology for their field                     Tools and norms ...
2.3 RELEVANCE                              TECHNOLOGY                             Multiple Pathways to                    ...
3. RATIONALE                         Participation                         needs to be                          meaningful...
3.1 RATIONALE                       TECHNOLOGY             Purposeful use of technology                         PowerPoint...
3.2 RATIONALE               TECHNOLOGY• Online components need to be used for a purpose               • UR Courses        ...
4. RELAXED                               Less formal atmosphere                                Your passion will translate...
4.1 RELAXED TECHNOLOGYTest any technology you intend to use ahead of time!           http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordp...
5. RAPPORT      Build community between instructor and           students and between students                Bring studen...
5.1 RAPPORT                             TECHNOLOGY        Establish acceptable communication practices with instructor    ...
5.2 RAPPORT          TECHNOLOGY        Social BookmarkingBookmark and share anything on the web
5.3 RAPPORT              TECHNOLOGY           Social NetworkingFacebook                       Twitter - #edchat
5.4 RAPPORT                       TECHNOLOGYCollaborative                                     Peer Review    workGoogle   ...
THANK YOU                        Questions?For more teaching tips, contact Cara Bradley – cara.bradley@uregina.caFor more ...
Teaching tips and technologies for reaching net generation
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Teaching tips and technologies for reaching net generation

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Workshop on 5 strategies for teaching the net generation with corresponding technologies that can be used to support pedagogical aims.

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  • CaraVarious names for this particular range of students depending on the traits emphasized
  • Cara
  • KirstenMindset List from Beloit College for students who were 18 as of the fall of 2011 and are expected to graduate in 2015, assuming they complete a 4 year degree in 4 years. This is a small sampling of their sociohistorical context.
  • Based on 5 R’s to reach Millenial studentsshared by Mary Bart on Faculty Focus from an online seminar by Christy Price, a psychology professor at Dalton State College
  • CaraAccessing higher or deeper learning according to Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. Go beyond just memorizing facts or copying down a lecture. 50 minutes or 3 hours of lecture is not an optimal learning environment for anyone.Turning the class into modules that offer different ways to access knowledge, offers something to different learning styles, offers ways to develop necessary skills.Engage the students in learning in various ways.Learn through solving a problem where they determine the knowledge they need based on the problem given and develop the pathways to a solution rather than having all parameters set out for them. Give them a way to actually use the knowledge you are trying to give them. Let them do something.
  • KirstenOption for engagement with material. Similar to course response systems or “clickers” but can be used for free with up to 40 responses per question. Ask different types of questions to illustrate common misconceptions, test knowledge, give previews of exam questions, assess learning or even show different opinions. Can be responded to with a text message (almost all phones now can text), you can tweet a reply or could access it through the internet. Use it for discussion and include peer instruction.
  • KirstenOnline debate that can be created by a professor and then students can participate both in adding arguments for each side and in voting for arguments with which they agree. Can be done during class or external to class. Opens up discussion during class because the students are required to think about the question rather than being given the answer. Could make them defend a view they do not actually hold or use it to discuss existing viewpoints. Access why students hold one view or another.
  • KirstenGames can add a competitive element to learning that motivates students and can either demonstrate a real world situation in a concrete way or can take students outside the real world to envision what an alternate world could be like. They can insert some fun into lessons which encourages engagement. MMORPG – Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game – SIMS online, World of Warcraft, Everquest, Second Life, etc. – Virtual space to interact. Students may be familiar with these environments already. They are generally problem-based or task based and can offer options to investigate ways to accomplish goals, interacting with others, economic development, social structures, etc. The process of building a world and what all goes into it may never have occurred to students so this can be an interesting teaching tool.Logic games can be played for free online. They can illustrate solving particular problems, learning patterns, access alternate ways to demonstrate something or be a fun way to teach students a particular skill. The visual component and actually playing the game can be more useful than a description on paper.Simulation assignments could be a virtual dissection or could be a simulation of a real world situation like Stephen Bend uses in his Geology course to have students simulate drilling for oil and all that goes into that from doing tests to providing documents and acquiring funding.Board games can again be electronic or more traditional games but they can often add something to a lesson.
  • CaraHow it relates to future employment, social engagement, being a better person, etc. Connect knowledge to something rather than assuming students will do that on their own Teach theories or skills as they are put into use rather than in a theoretical way without concrete application. Easier to remember something once you’re using it. Provide steps as needed or allow students to follow steps at their own pace.
  • KirstenUsing Skype or other chat/video conferencing software can allow you to bring in an expert who you normally couldn’t. This class brought in Mike Rauch from Rauch Brothers Animation. Talking to someone who is actually engaged in the subject can offer an experiential element. People really do this, really use this material, think this way, etc. Suddenly it isn’t just something to learn for a class, it’s something that’s relevant to life.
  • KirstenEven if students seem competent with technology, they still need to be taught skills because they may not know more advanced tasks or they may not know the difference between their social use of something and a professional use. They may not know things relevant to their field. Can’t teach just the content but need to teach them what they will need to use, whether it’s about the technology or not.What computer programs should they be able to use? Setting that up at the beginning can demonstrate expectations of a course, and knowing how those programs get used explains why they have to know it. Do they need to know a different type of writing for different modes within the field like online vs offline journals? Is there a piece of technology they need to be familiar with and ways of using it that they wouldn’t have used in their everyday life? Advanced features of Word, Excel, Gmail, etc.CaraWhat sources of knowledge are out there? Reliance on wikipedia, lack of evaluation of websites, etc.Appropriate communication. Formal vs informal.Particular citation style? Software? Technical expectations? Copyright issues?
  • CaraDifferent ways to access demonstrate knowledge, different ways of learning. Make it relevant to them and their interests. Alternate assignment? Alternate topic?KirstenMultiple technologies that can help students use different ways to demonstrate knowledge. To write an essay they could use a Google doc or a wiki which can be shared and done collaboratively. Or use Wordpress to share it with the public and their peers. (originally software for building a blog but can now do just about anything from a community sharing website to a webcomic to an organizational website. )They could post a video on youtube. They could use WordPress to build a website Use Glogster to make a poster. Use SlideShare.net to share a PowerPoint presentation or Prezi to make something more dynamic. Make a photo collage using Picasa or a board on Pinterest. Post a review online on Netflix, Yelp or Amazon. These are relevant ways to share information, both to them and to the wider world as they are making a contribution not just to their class but to something more than that.
  • CaraThey need to know the “why” behind things.Tell them your expectations about communication and why – 24 hour response time? 48 hour response time? Remind them that you have other commitments besides being their professor.If they need to use a technology or you do, make sure you know why it is being used. Pedagogical reasons and relevance to the field.Explain why deadlines matter. Make participation meaningful such as giving a grade, giving extra credit, explaining how it furthers their understanding or could be useful beyond your class.
  • KirstenIf you want to use technology, think about what you’re using and how. Is it actually working for you? Don’t use it just to use it. What does it help you accomplish?Powerpoint as example. (click)This used to be notes on the board or an overhead. It’s all too easy to put all your notes there. Death by powerpoint. and then students are so busy copying that they aren’t listening. They aren’t active learners, they’re passive. (click) Use it to help guide them to important parts of the lecture. (click) Use an image, chart, graph, video, etc to demonstrate your point.
  • KirstenThe same thing goes for online components. Using an online component with an assignment designed for a face to face class is not likely to be a big benefit. But designing an online component that benefits from being online does!Have students share information in the forum of UR courses or introduce themselves so you can have something to go back to to help memorize names/faces (if they’ve put in a profile picture).Use an online chat to facilitate a discussion about a particular issue in real time that can prepare them for the next class or allow them to gather after a separated activity. Have them contribute to a glossary to share knowledge and engage in peer instruction. Compile information in a wiki which can become a shared resource for them and future students.
  • CaraStudents today prefer a less formal atmosphere in the classroom. They recognize the authority of the prof as an expert but don’t necessarily want a highly formal situation with the prof standing at the front lecturing and all of them silently taking notes. Less distance, more passion.Instead of highly structured assignments, give them room for options that could match their individual interest or inquiry. Think back to methods of demonstrating knowledge.
  • KirstenPart of a relaxed atmosphere is knowing that what you plan to do will work. Technical glitches can happen, but the more familiar you are and the more prepared, the better.Make sure you’ve tested any new technology in the room, on the computer you’ll be using. Happened to me where a malfunction left me scrambling during a workshop to demonstrate because I assumed it would just work. More comfortable you are, the less it will stand out that you’re using technology. It will just be part of how you teach instead of something you arranged your teaching around.
  • CaraImportant to have a community in the classroom and that needs to be built.Instructor to student – what can you do? Learning names, making clear your interest, being availableStudent to student – building in social interactionThey spend so much time separated that classrooms give them time to be with people and learn appropriate social skills, learn how to build rapport.Collaborative work can help build this.Also bringing the students into the learning community. Show them that they are part of something.
  • CaraCommunication is important. Need to make clear to them the appropriate communication practices. What language do you expect? Do not contact 20 minutes before a class just to check something last minute.KirstenMultiple channels available and it is up to instructors to set the boundaries for this. How do you want them getting in touch with you? What channels should they NOT use? Make self aware of options. If you do not know it exists, you may be missing communication.
  • KirstenOne way to bring into learning community and work collaboratively is to use social media to share what they find on the web.Delicious and diigo allow sharing of bookmarks so you can compile links of interesting material and tag it with categories and your students can also make their own lists. They may find something you never thought of and contribute to the conversation.Pinterest allows for sharing of pictures found on the internet. Interested students could build a “board” of pictures about a specific topic for a presentation. Organize by board, add a comment. Great for inspiration concepts, commentary, etc. Also identifies where an image came from and can be “repinned” on another board by someone else and you can see who has “repinned” what you pin. Can search on Pinterest for interesting content as well as the wider web
  • KirstenSocial networking is something familiar to students but can also be used by instructors.Facebook – Brenda Anderson uses Facebook to share articles with her students and also creates groups that students can join (but do not need to as it is not U of R software), to have discussions, share notes or link articles and posts on the web. Creates a community that is engaged and brings students into a conversation through a medium they already use. May want to create a professional profile vs a personal one.Twitter is used by many in education. Can be used for a backchannel (the technological equivalent of passing notes or whispering) which happens during conferences and is now moving into education. Could be a way to compile questions that are shared. Use of a “hashtag” (pound sign followed by a term or abbreviation) notes tweets relevant to a topic. Can also be a good way to engage in a wider conversation both for instructors and students. Open to the public so students could get a response from someone in the field. They become part of the wider conversation.Or use it yourself to share your research or connect with others talking about things of interest to you
  • CaraOptions for doing collaborative work and peer review. Pedagogical benefits to allowing peer instruction and working together as well as better quality of work when done for peers vs a professor. Could widen it to the community. Professional community always peer reviews so why not students?KirstenCan use Google Docs, a wiki or a blog to allow collaboration. Students working together build their own community. Collaboration is normal for them and they don’t consider it cheating so find ways to build it in to give them that time.Arts is using Turnitin which allows for a fairly formal peer review process. A blog could allow, with permission, posting student assignments to the wider public. In one example by Derek Bruff, student assignment on cryptography got a response from one of the experts cited. A wiki allows students to share articles and could allow students to help edit one another’s articles before it is handed in. A forum can allow the same thing in a different format. OR could be repository of good examples.
  • Teaching tips and technologies for reaching net generation

    1. 1. TEACHING TIPS AND TECHNOLOGIES FORREACHING NET GENERATION STUDENTS
    2. 2. WHO ARE THEY? Generation Y Millennials Nexters Baby BoomGeneration Net Echo Me Generation Generation Generation Echo Next Boomers Digital Natives
    3. 3. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW “Technology” They They are means something Visual were used to new and culture being They are used to innovative and means a born connected multitasking (or doesn’t include higher multidistracting) computers, cell emphasis on1981/2 to the phones, etc., which visual -1994 internet are just for facilitating tasks learning
    4. 4. MINDSET LIST FOR 2015 GRADS (18 IN FALL 2011) As they’ve grown up on websites and cell Their school’s There has always been phones, experts have “blackboards” have Video games have always an Internet ramp onto constantly fretted about their alleged deficits of always been getting had ratings.the information highway. empathy and smarter. concentration. While they’ve been Electric cars have always playing outside, their Music has always beenDial-up is soooooooooo been humming in parents have always available via free last century! relative silence on the worried about nasty new downloads. road. bugs borne by birds and mosquitoes. They’ve often broken up Their parents have Public schools have with their significant always been able to Nurses have always been always made space others via create a will and other in short supply.available for advertising. texting, Facebook, or legal documents online. MySpace. They’re the first They won’t go near a “PC” has come to mean generation to grow up Women have always retailer that lacks a Personal Computer, not hearing about the been Venusians; website. Political Correctness. dangerous overuse of men, Martians. antibiotics. http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2015/
    5. 5. BEFORE WE START…These teaching techniques are positive for all students, net generation or not.
    6. 6. 1. ACTIVE LEARNINGProblem-based Hands-on learning investigation Switch learning modes during a classLecture Discussion Lecture Video Activity
    7. 7. 1.1 ACTIVE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY PollEverywhere.com
    8. 8. 1.2 ACTIVE LEARNING TECHNOLOGYCreateDebate.com
    9. 9. 1.3 ACTIVE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY Games Logic games Simulation BoardMMORPG online assignments games
    10. 10. 2. RELEVANCE Why does it matter?Connections to the larger world Just-in-time learning
    11. 11. 2.1 RELEVANCE TECHNOLOGY Skype Bring in an expertSkype Q & A chat with animation artist Mike Rauch from Rauch Brothers Animation: rauchbrothers.com (photo by mrmayo)
    12. 12. 2.2 RELEVANCE TECHNOLOGYAppropriate use of technology for their field Tools and norms Online Writing vs Print? Citation? Appropriate Communication Style?Databases, journals, websites, etc? Computer Programs? Technology?
    13. 13. 2.3 RELEVANCE TECHNOLOGY Multiple Pathways to Demonstrate Knowledge Photo Essay Video Web page Poster PowerPoint Review Collage Google Glogster SlideShare Picasa Amazon YouTube Wordpress docs Wiki Prezi Pinterest YelpWordpress Netflix
    14. 14. 3. RATIONALE Participation needs to be meaningful Explain why for class expectations and include boundaries• Communication Give the• tech use reasoning• deadlines behind what you do
    15. 15. 3.1 RATIONALE TECHNOLOGY Purposeful use of technology PowerPoint Library DatabasesLess WorldCat Worldcat • has world’s largest network of library content and services is • great for doing general searches to find out what ATLA Religion Databasemore! books, articles, videos, etc exist on a topic but sometimes too large and not specialized ATLA ATLA Religion Database Religion Worldcat Database • Specialized database for articles, books and book reviews identified as being about religion • Great for topics that are obviously focused on religion and does include access to some fulltext articles but can be too narrow when topics bridge subjects.
    16. 16. 3.2 RATIONALE TECHNOLOGY• Online components need to be used for a purpose • UR Courses • Forum, Chat, Glossary, Wiki
    17. 17. 4. RELAXED Less formal atmosphere Your passion will translate Allow for individual interest or inquiryPhoto by IK’s World Trip Assignment options
    18. 18. 4.1 RELAXED TECHNOLOGYTest any technology you intend to use ahead of time! http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/funny-pictures-cats-try-to-restart-computer.jpg
    19. 19. 5. RAPPORT Build community between instructor and students and between students Bring students into the learning communityStudents dowant social Make workinteraction collaborative
    20. 20. 5.1 RAPPORT TECHNOLOGY Establish acceptable communication practices with instructor Appropriate email language/usage UR Courses“can i hand in my assignment l8 emailbcuz i slept in lol? Facebook uregina.ca emailkthnx bai” Communication channels UR Courses Twitter instant messages Cell phone Telephone
    21. 21. 5.2 RAPPORT TECHNOLOGY Social BookmarkingBookmark and share anything on the web
    22. 22. 5.3 RAPPORT TECHNOLOGY Social NetworkingFacebook Twitter - #edchat
    23. 23. 5.4 RAPPORT TECHNOLOGYCollaborative Peer Review workGoogle Wiki Blog Turnitin Blog Wiki Forum Docs
    24. 24. THANK YOU Questions?For more teaching tips, contact Cara Bradley – cara.bradley@uregina.caFor more tech tips, contact Kirsten Hansen – kirsten.hansen@uregina.ca

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