Small Town Rules by @BeckyMcCray

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  • “Everything gigantic in American life is about to get smaller or die.” That’s a pretty dramatic claim by James Kunstler, writing in Business Insider. He says we’re on the brink of scale implosion. While it may be tough to believe that while Oklahoma is experiencing a substantial boom, we’ve learned something from our previous booms. We know that every resource has limits, and that anything that seems like a “sure thing” is sure not to last. We know that every boom is followed by…. a bust. So when Kunstler points to rising fuel costs, global currency conflicts, and tighter limits on revolving corporate credit as strangling the big growth model in retail, I can see what he’s talking about. 4 years after the official end of Great Recession, we’re realizing that the game has changed. The pursuit of “economy of scale” at all costs has proven self-destructive to our society. Efficiency and growth are no longer the paramount values to us. The new game looks a lot more like a small town.
  • It’s not just business. This is an underlying trend in society. The Guardian news in the UK spotted the art and design trend in November, and called it The New Ruralism: how the pastoral idyll is taking over our cities“Everywhere you look, the countryside has crept into cities and towns – the way we shop, eat, read, dress, decorate our homes, spend our time.” Shopping at farmer’s markets. Planting gardens, keeping chickens and bees and ducks. Canning and preserving food. Decorating with more wood and natural materials. More plants and growing vines. Building rustic playgrounds with wooden toys. Converting open grass lots into “meadows” with wildflowers, shrubs and trees.“We can't get enough nature in our lives.”http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/nov/18/new-ruralism-takes-over-cities?CMP=twt_gu
  • Small Town Rules by @BeckyMcCray

    1. 1. Becky McCray
    2. 2. Everything GIGANTIC is about to get smaller or die(CC) by Cote
    3. 3. Community-oriented retail
    4. 4. Brands are catching on
    5. 5. A new ruralism istaking over our cities
    6. 6. It’s just like a small town
    7. 7. I. The New Economy
    8. 8. @BeckyMcCrayRule 1: Plan for Zero
    9. 9. 5 years of ups and downs
    10. 10. Plan ahead for fuel costs
    11. 11. @BeckyMcCrayRule 2: Spend Brainpower Before Dollars
    12. 12. Be creatively frugal
    13. 13. Use creative financing
    14. 14. @BeckyMcCrayRule 3: Multiply Your Lines of Income
    15. 15. (PD) USDA-NRCS Plant multiple crops
    16. 16. It’s not just farms…
    17. 17. #SmallTownRules1. Plan for Zero2. Spend Brainpower Before Dollars3. Multiply Lines of Income4.5.6.7.
    18. 18. (CC) Citrix OnlineII. The New Technology
    19. 19. @BeckyMcCrayRule 4: Work Anywhere, Anywhen
    20. 20. (CC) by mezzoblue
    21. 21. @BeckyMcCrayRule 5: Learn customer- driven communication
    22. 22. Customers drivecommunications
    23. 23. #SmallTownRules1.2.3.4. Work Anywhere, Anywhen5. Learn Customer Driven Communication6.7.
    24. 24. III. The New Society
    25. 25. @BeckyMcCrayRule 6: Be Proud of Being Small
    26. 26. Stay small while building big(CC) By GORE-TEX
    27. 27. @BeckyMcCrayRule 7: Be Local
    28. 28. Shiner is small town
    29. 29. Atlanta’s hometown airline
    30. 30. National brand, local ties
    31. 31. #SmallTownRules1.2.3.4.5.6. Be Proud of Being Small7. Be Local
    32. 32. (CC) JimmyWayne
    33. 33. #SmallTownRules1. Plan for Zero2. Spend Brainpower Before Dollars3. Multiply Lines of Income4. Work Anywhere, Anywhen5. Learn Customer Driven Communication6. Be Proud of Being Small7. Be Local
    34. 34. Micropolitan: A Local, Living Economy
    35. 35. Locally-owned small businesses are our future
    36. 36. www.BeckyMcCray.com/connect

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