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PermacultureDesign Project[address redacted]Christina Thorbourne
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne2Vision: Mission StatementOur goal is to design, plant and grow an sustainableurb...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne3Vision: Goals1. Restore the use of the abandonedlot at [address redacted] andrei...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne4Assessment: Watershed & BioregionBoth properties are located in Kings County, Ne...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Assessment: Climatic ProfileFirst and Last Average Frost DateOctober 20...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne6Assessment: Aerial & Front View
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne7Assessment: Base Map1105 62789341: Residence2: Front Yard / Rose Mallow3: Street...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne8Assessment: Sector AnalysisPrevailingWestern WindsSummer Sun PathFoot TrafficStr...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne9Assessment: Elevation View40 ft
[address redacted] • Christina ThorbourneAssessment: Zones of Use1 104Entry WayEntry WayGate Entry WaySidewalk
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne11Assessment: Water Flow AnalysisOpen downspoutcoming from overhangdraining onto[...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne12Assessment: Rain Fall AnalysisStormwater runoff is a serious contributor to wat...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne13Assessment: Soil SurveyAccording to theNYC Reconnaissance Soil Survey:Soil Profi...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne14Assessment: Soil Test5% clay30% silt65% sandDesign site resultsindicate sandy c...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne15Assessment: Resources for CompostingGreens BrownsGarden trimmings fromyardLeave...
[address redacted] • Christina ThorbournePlanning: Plant Guild ListCommonNectaryPlantShelterPlantGroundCoverFertilizerNitr...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Plant Guild Map17Quince TreeRed CurrantSundial LupineGerman ...
Common YarrowGroundcoverDwarf ComfreyHerbaceous LayerRed CurrantShrub Layer[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Microclimate Design193211: Quince Tree2: Rain Harvesting Sys...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Microclimate Design Description201: A south-facing quince tr...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: The Master Plan2112456738910111243133
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Master Plan Legend221 Street tree provided by MilliontreesNYC2...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Applied Permaculture Principles23Integrate Rather than Segrega...
[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Phases of Implementation24Phases of implementation allow for fi...
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Permaculture Final Design Project for Certification

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Permaculture Final Design Project for Certification

  1. 1. PermacultureDesign Project[address redacted]Christina Thorbourne
  2. 2. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne2Vision: Mission StatementOur goal is to design, plant and grow an sustainableurban permaculture site by the means of ediblelandscaping, water catchment and compostingsystems and energy efficient planting. The purpose ofthis site is to help rehabilitate our urban ecosystemwhile fostering environmental behavior and inspiringtogetherness among our residents and localcommunity.
  3. 3. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne3Vision: Goals1. Restore the use of the abandonedlot at [address redacted] andreintegrate into community.2. Incorporate plant guild includingdiverse species with mutuallybeneficial relationships onto designsite.3. Implement energy savingmeasures based on microclimatedesign in 10ft perimeter around mainbuilding.4. Harvest abundant rainwaterresources for design site irrigationand storm water runoff reduction.5. Create separate space on rooftopfor farming with the intention toboost food security for design siteresidents.6. Establish functioning compostingsystem for design site using on-premises waste along with localresources in the neighborhood.
  4. 4. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne4Assessment: Watershed & BioregionBoth properties are located in Kings County, New York, an area nestled between New Jersey to theWest, Manhattan and Queens counties to the North, Long Island to the East and bordered by theAtlantic Ocean to the South. Kings County, or better known as Brooklyn, lies within the southernpart of the Atlantic Ocean/Long Island Sound Watershed. Major water quality concerns in this cityare storm water runoff and water pollution, which can be addressed on a local level throughpermaculture strategies.The New York City bioregion covers parts of New York, New Jersey,Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. In October 2012 thisexpansive area interwoven by economic, social andenvironmental ties was hit the costliest hurricaneever for the region, with the estimated costs around$42 billion. Main issues impacting Brooklyn werestorm surge flooding, power outages, and downedtrees. Permaculture practices such as ediblelandscapes, rainwater catchment systems andalternative energy offer ways to addresssustainable disaster preparedness throughself-reliance.
  5. 5. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Assessment: Climatic ProfileFirst and Last Average Frost DateOctober 20 through April 18Record 24 hour rainfall 4.49” Record low temperature -15°F in February of 1934Record high temperature 106°F in July of 1936.5TempHigh °FTempLow °FRainfallInchesJanuary 38 27 3.88February 42 29 2.96March 50 35 4.04April 61 45 3.93May 71 54 4.43June 79 64 3.51July 84 69 4.53August 83 68 4.13September 75 61 3.98October 64 50 3.39November 54 42 3.8December 43 32 3.6
  6. 6. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne6Assessment: Aerial & Front View
  7. 7. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne7Assessment: Base Map1105 62789341: Residence2: Front Yard / Rose Mallow3: Street Tree Planter4: Sidewalk5: Abandoned Property / Thicket6: American Elm7: Raised Bed with Stairs8: Raised Beds9: Flagstones10: Concrete Slab
  8. 8. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne8Assessment: Sector AnalysisPrevailingWestern WindsSummer Sun PathFoot TrafficStreet NoiseWinter Sun PathUnobstructedSunshineSouth-FacingWind BlockHigh Fence &Enclosed by TallBuildingsUrban WildlifeBirds, Squirrels,Raccoons, FeralCatsNorth-FacingShadows fromBuilding, DarkShade
  9. 9. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne9Assessment: Elevation View40 ft
  10. 10. [address redacted] • Christina ThorbourneAssessment: Zones of Use1 104Entry WayEntry WayGate Entry WaySidewalk
  11. 11. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne11Assessment: Water Flow AnalysisOpen downspoutcoming from overhangdraining onto[address redacted]Downspouts for rooftopand overhang coveringbay window anddoorway into groundWater FlowDownspoutImpermeable Surface
  12. 12. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne12Assessment: Rain Fall AnalysisStormwater runoff is a serious contributor to waterpollution in New York City as a result of urban areashaving a greater percentage of impervious surfaceswhich causes rainwater and snowmelt to be sweptaway directly into the surrounding rivers and estuariesinstead of seeping into the ground. The design site’simpermeable surfaces include the front yard, sansplanting area, the rooftop and overhangs, as well asthe concrete slab in the back yard. Brooklyn, NY hasan annual precipitation of 47 inches or 3.9 ft. Theseareas produce 31,452 gallons of runoff per year,which can be harvested through rain catchmentsystems in order to use towards irrigating bothproperties and to combat stormwater runoff pollution.
  13. 13. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne13Assessment: Soil SurveyAccording to theNYC Reconnaissance Soil Survey:Soil Profile #2: Pavement & buildings,till substratum, 0 to 5 percent slopes;nearly level to gently sloping, highlyurbanized areas with more than 80percent of the surface covered byimpervious pavement and buildings,over glacial till; generally located inurbancenters.Design SiteSoil Profile #2
  14. 14. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne14Assessment: Soil Test5% clay30% silt65% sandDesign site resultsindicate sandy clay loamsoil texture at design site
  15. 15. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne15Assessment: Resources for CompostingGreens BrownsGarden trimmings fromyardLeaves and twigs fromelm treeFruit and veggie scrapsfrom kitchenPotting soil from indoorplantsCoffee grounds and teabags from home andcoffee shopsBread, egg shells, papertowels, and newspaperfrom home
  16. 16. [address redacted] • Christina ThorbournePlanning: Plant Guild ListCommonNectaryPlantShelterPlantGroundCoverFertilizerNitrogenFixerDynamicAccumulatorPestConfuserEdiblePartsLayer HeightQuince Tree xFruitMedicinalSub-Canopy 10 - 20 ftRed Currant x x Fruit Shrub 3 - 5 ftSundialLupinex x x x x Poisonous Herbaceous 1 - 2 ftGermanChamomilex x x xTeaMedicinalHerbaceousDwarfComfreyx x x x x Medicinal Herbaceous 8 - 12 inSkirret x x Root Rhizosphere 3 ftCommonYarrowx x x x x Groundcover 2 - 3 ftHardyKiwifruitFruitMedicinalVertical 20 – 100 in16
  17. 17. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Plant Guild Map17Quince TreeRed CurrantSundial LupineGerman ChamomileDwarf ComfreySkirretCommon YarrowHardy Kiwifruit
  18. 18. Common YarrowGroundcoverDwarf ComfreyHerbaceous LayerRed CurrantShrub Layer[address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Plant Guild Photos18Sundial LupineHerbaceous LayerHardy KiwiVertical LayerSkirretRhizosphereQuinceSub-CanopyGerman ChamomileHerbaceous Layer
  19. 19. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Microclimate Design193211: Quince Tree2: Rain Harvesting System3: English Ivy4: Rooftop Garden242
  20. 20. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Planning: Microclimate Design Description201: A south-facing quince tree provides shade which will cast over the front ofthe house during summer; however, because the tree is deciduous it will notblock sun rays from passively heating the building through during winter.2: Rainwater harvesting systems decrease water usage for irrigation and helpcombat rain water runoff pollution by slowing runoff down, spreading it outthrough irrigation and allowing the water to soak into the ground.4: A roof top garden provides natural insulation and temperature control for thebuilding, which can reduce heating and cooling expenses. It also helps mitigatethe urban heat island effect and combats rain water runoff pollution.3: English ivy along the south-eastern facing facade creates a green wall,providing a barrier between weather and exposure to solar radiation, whichhelps reduce cooling requirements. It also dampens noise pollution and isaesthetically and visually pleasing to the eye.
  21. 21. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: The Master Plan2112456738910111243133
  22. 22. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Master Plan Legend221 Street tree provided by MilliontreesNYC2 Plant guild (see earlier slide)3 Rain harvesting system4 Compost station5 Keyhole beds (shade tolerant vegetables)6 English ivy7 Tool shed8 Mulberry bush9 Bird bath10 Benches11 Vegetable garden12 Herb garden13 Rooftop garden (container gardening)
  23. 23. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Applied Permaculture Principles23Integrate Rather than Segregate Usage of dilapidated building structureProduce No Waste On-site/neighborhood composting resourcesCatch and Store Energy Rainwater harvesting for irrigationObtain a Yield Rooftop garden and community garden for foodUse and Value Diversity Diverse plant guild with various purposes
  24. 24. [address redacted] • Christina Thorbourne March 2013Design: Phases of Implementation24Phases of implementation allow for financial resources to be spread over a longer period oftime. Because of the limited budget, we came up with a plan as follows:Now 1 - 2 yrs 3 - 6 yrs[addressredacted]Request street tree for planter boxPlant herb and vegetable garden inbackyardSetup composting stationImplement rainwater harvestingsystemSetup and expand container garden onrooftop[addressredacted]Submit proposal to property ownerand block association and requestaccessConduct soil testsRemove weeds from propertyApply for beautification grants offeredby NYCConduct soil remediation, if necessaryEstablish plant guild in front yardSetup rainwater harvesting system andcomposting stationSolicit volunteers for project throughblock association, NYC Cares, etc.Implement changes to rest of property

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