Flavor and Fragrance Innovation: Regional Inspirations

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Flavor and Fragrance Innovation: Regional Inspirations

  1. 1. © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission Page 1 Flavor and Fragrance Innovation: Regional Inspirations How cross-regional flavor transfer is helping to create new and enticing products Reference Code: CM00234-024 Publication Date: 25 September 2013 © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission The information in this document has been extracted from published Datamonitor research by a registered user of Datamonitor’s Knowledge Centers. Datamonitor holds no responsibility for the loss of original context and for any changes made to information following its extraction. All information was current at the time of extraction although the original content may have been subsequently updated. Please refer back to the website to view the most recent content and the original source of the information. About the author Executive Summary New and emerging flavors and fragrances Regional sources of innovation Latin American influences Creating the products of the future
  2. 2. © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission Page 2 ABOUT THE AUTHOR Carol Raithatha is the director of Carol Raithatha Limited (www.carolraithatha.co.uk), a UK-based consultancy specializing in advice, training, and project work within the areas of consumer goods research and sensory testing. She has worked with a range of consumer goods manufacturers, including Associated British Foods, Cadbury, and Unilever, among others. The role of flavors and fragrances in producing optimum products, defining category boundaries, and creating unique brand messages is one of the areas in which Carol has a particular interest. Carol has a bachelor's degree in food science from the University of California, a master's degree in applied biological sciences from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an MBA from the Open University. She is a fellow of the Institute of Food Science and Technology and the secretary of its Professional Food Sensory Group, a member of the Society of Chemical Industry, and a full member of the Market Research Society. Carol has over 20 years of experience of working in the food and drink industry and has recently also been involved in projects within the personal care sector. Disclaimer Copyright © 2013 Datamonitor This report is published by Datamonitor (the Publisher). This report contains information from reputable sources and although reasonable efforts have been made to publish accurate information, you assume sole responsibility for the selection, suitability and use of this report and acknowledge that the Publisher makes no warranties (either express or implied) as to, nor accepts liability for, the accuracy or fitness for a particular purpose of the information or advice contained herein. The Publisher wishes to make it clear that any views or opinions expressed in this report by individual authors or contributors are their personal views and opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views/opinions of the Publisher. Disclaimer Copyright © 2013 Datamonitor This report is published by Datamonitor (the Publisher). This report contains information from reputable sources and although reasonable efforts have been made to publish accurate information, you assume sole responsibility for the selection, suitability and use of this report and acknowledge that the Publisher makes no warranties (either express or implied) as to, nor accepts liability for, the accuracy or fitness for a particular purpose of the information or advice contained herein. The Publisher wishes to make it clear that any views or opinions expressed in this report by individual authors or contributors are their personal views and opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views/opinions of the Publisher.
  3. 3. © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission Page 3 NEW AND EMERGING FLAVORS AND FRAGRANCES This section looks at the top, fastest-growing, and new flavors and fragrances, in product launches by region, for important categories within three main sectors (food, drink, and personal care). The categories for which data are shown are savory snacks, soft drinks, and haircare and personal hygiene. The emphasis is on identifying common trends and evidence of regional migration, and explaining how and why changes are occurring. Case studies within each category are shown to help to understand how cross-regional flavor migration happens and how the concepts might be applied to other categories. Soft drinks Figure 1 shows the top, fastest-growing, and new flavors in soft drinks product launches. Fig 1: Top, fastest-growing, and new flavors in new soft drinks Source: Product Launch Analytics © Datamonitor The top soft drink flavors are quite consistent across regions, although there are some variations. Orange, lemon, mango, and peach are in the top 10 soft drink flavors in all regions as well as globally. Grape is a top flavor globally and in four of the five regions. Top flavors that are unique to specific regions are milk and honey in APAC, chocolate in Latin America, guava and tropical in MEA, and vanilla and berry in North America.
  4. 4. © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission Page 4 REGIONAL SOURCES OF INNOVATION Fig 10: New food launches featuring quinoa Source: Company information © Datamonitor
  5. 5. © Datamonitor This report is a licensed product and is not to be reproduced without prior permission Page 5 CREATING THE PRODUCTS OF THE FUTURE Reverse innovation Reverse innovation is becoming a popular concept and can be broadly defined as the uptake and spread of a technology or product created in developing or emerging economies to developed economies and markets. Because they may have been developed in low resource contexts, these technologies or products are often cost-effective and/or sustainable. The topic has been discussed in the bestselling book by Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble: Reverse Innovation: Create Far From Home, Win Everywhere. Applying the concept of reverse innovation to flavors and fragrances highlights some likely future trends and creates a possible route for exotic, affordable, and sustainable innovations. One example of reverse innovation in food and drink flavors and ingredients is the use of insects as food. Insects are a cheap and plentiful source of protein in some regions where other sources of protein are scarce and/or too expensive for a large proportion of the population. There is considerable interest in the possibilities of insects as a global food source and the subject is the source of research funding. In 2013 the Food and Agriculture Organization published a report titled Edible insects: Future prospects for food and feed security. For example, according to the Nordic Food Lab, a wide variety of ant species are eaten around the world, and they can be flavorful supplements and are sometimes given as symbolic gifts (Nordic Food Lab, 2013). The Nordic Food Lab has received DKK3.6m ($650,000) from the Velux Foundation for "analysis of cultural and taste barriers for entomophagy (the eating of insects) and development of taste experiences to erode these barriers in the Western society". Insects could be introduced in the context of increasingly popularity of ethnic street food. In March 2013, Wahaca (a Mexican street food restaurant chain) launched an experimental dish made with grasshoppers at its Southbank restaurant in London. According to the Wahaca blog, chapulines (a type of grasshoppers) are considered a much sought-after delicacy in Mexico. The dish was called chapulines fundidos and the preparation of it described as such: "We take fried chapulines and cook them with softened shallots, garlic and smoky chipotle chillies to create a delicious salsa, which is served with queso fundido, a mixture of gratinated mozzarella and cheddar cheese, perfect for scooping up with corn tortillas." (Wahaca, 2013) Reverse innovation is an accepted strategy within the personal care sector, and is therefore a potential source of new fragrance and ingredient ideas. For example, according to the Times of India, when Jacques Challes moved from the role of managing director of L'Oreal India to chief innovation officer for the L'Oreal Group in 2012, he said that in his new role he would be encouraging reverse innovations from India (Times of India, 2012).
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