System Center 2012 Data Center and Private Cloud Overview

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These are the slide to the webinar that covers the features in Systems Center 2012 that make it an excellent tool for managing your data center and private cloud. We will examine how Systems Center 2012 has evolved to meet the needs of the data center. We’ll see how demand is bringing cloud computing to every business sooner or later and how it will help business manage IT costs and complexity.

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  • Lesson 1: Microsoft Vision for Cloud Computing Lesson 2: Microsoft Private Cloud Architecture with System Center 2012Lesson 3: Moving to the Cloud: Preparations and DecisionsITSM for Private Cloud Lesson 4: Microsoft Programs and Incentives for the CloudMicrosoft Programs and Incentives for Private Cloud Virtualization / Cloud Sizing with MAP 6.0
  • Transition from previous slideBefore we go any further, let’s level set on what we mean by the cloudGoal of this slideCover the promise of the cloud and what makes up a cloudKey Messages to landCloud Computing is a model, it’s not about locationThe promises are not new, per se, but something that we’ve been striving to achieve over the past many years. That said, the cloud computing model offers a phenomenal opportunity to realize dramatic improvements in agility and cost at an accelerated pace. Talking PointsI'm talking about the cloud, I want you to think about, I'm talking about a compute model, not a location. So, when I talk about the cloud, I'm not talking about necessarily the public cloud or the private cloud, I'm talking about the model that underlies wherever the cloud may be running. Now, there are a certain set of attributes and characteristics that are just fundamental and core to cloud computing. Things like the ability to offer a self-service experience so that the application or service owners can do real-time deployment of the services. It runs on a shared infrastructure, and a part of our job is to make sure that we're taking the fullest advantage of that shared infrastructure. Cloud computing, you know, builds applications that are able to dynamically expand and contract as the business needs. And then, finally, it's usage-based, meaning that you can track what's being used in terms of storage, compute, network, bill back, if you want to, and at least at a minimum, show back so that the service owners, the business units understand what the cost is of what they're consuming. These are the core attributes of the cloud.  With that said – cloud computing is the on-demand delivery of applications as standardized IT services, and inherently has four key attributes: Pooled Resources: As I mentioned earlier, we often hear that cloud computing is just big virtualization. It’s not. Cloud Computing uses virtualization but it adds significantly to virtualization. It pools those resources together and allows you to dynamically provision and scale applications. Self Service: Once you pool your resource, Cloud Computing provides a self service way for the business to get at those resources or more specifically by providing self-service IT infrastructure to business units and departments with an SLA. This forces service-level discussion and removes the burden to procure, provision and manage infrastructure on a per application, ad-hoc basis Elastic – Scale up (or scale down) dynamically as resource needs change, enabling faster delivery of capacity.Usage Based – Paying for only what you use, when you need to use it I am sure just hearing the attributes the benefits are crystalizing for each of you but I do want to spend a few minutes talking about the biggest benefits from our perspective:Focus: This is about having more people able to focus on higher-level parts of the stack, managing those applications SLAs, rolling out new applications, not having to worry about the underlying infrastructure.Agility: This is not only about being able to deliver the applications more quickly to your users and to your customers, but also being able to respond to changes in demand. So, the next time the marketing department launches a campaign, doesn't tell anybody, your public website is underwater, it's very easy to scale that out quickly to meet that demand.Economics: Because you're running multiple workloads on the same overall infrastructure, you get better utilization across those applications. And because the Cloud pools together these resources, you can buy broader sets of resources at one time, lowering the overall cost. So, for agility and focus and economics, you have great motivation to move to the Cloud, and those benefits accrue to both public and to private Cloud Computing.
  • Transition from previous slideLet’s talk about the transformation that's actually happening within IT. Goal of this slideFrames the enterprise cloud computing conversation by highlighting the evolution from traditional to cloud computing models. Define industry taxonomy around IaaS and PaaS. Talking Points: If you're in the infrastructure as a service layer (IaaS), you're thinking about your datacenter as a set of pooled resources (including compute, network and storage), not in terms of individual hosts or VMs. When you're in the platform as a service layer (PaaS), you're talking about building applications which will then be delivered as a service – the platform providing all the required building blocks for your app. Think Windows Azure. A couple of data points from internal Microsoft research: 41% of our customers are using services across on premise and public clouds80% of our customers over next 3 to 5 years will use hybrid models
  • Talking points: We're in the midst of a massive transformation. This is the transformation from client-server to cloud computing. And our mission, simply put, is to lead this transformation by cloud-optimizing every business and really bring the benefits of this transformation to our customers. At this point, the benefits are well known. It's the ability of the customer to be able to focus on their core competency. It's their ability to innovate with agility and it's their ability to derive economic benefit that goes far beyond anything virtualization has achieved.
  • Talking points: So, for us to be able to deliver this transformation to cloud, the thing that we want to build is a broad and deep platform. And this broad and deep platform has to reflect the realities of the IT infrastructure of our customers. So, that means it has to span the private and the public cloud. So, when it comes to the private cloud, for example, we have to have a great operating system and the hypervisor layer, which we have with Windows Server Hyper-V. We need to have a great management infrastructure with System Center, and a database. So, that's what's really needed in the private cloud environment. On the public cloud side, we have Windows Azure, which has got both the core cloud operating system that you really can't fake your way into it, you've got to build it by running the data centers that run the public cloud service. And then on top of the cloud operating system, you also have to have the database capability that's been natively built for the cloud. But it's just not the fact that we have a broad and deep platform that spans the public and private, it's the commonalities that bring together this platform for our customers' hybrid IT environments. The commonalities are identity, virtualization, management, and the application development environment. So, it's that platform that’s really our strategy for really reflecting the realities of hybrid IT, which is going to be what our customers will demand from us as an ecosystem. We already have great momentum as we speak. If you look at where we are on the private cloud side, we have System Center and Windows Server. Windows Server is the most-used operating system, with 76 percent share. Our hypervisor share in the last 18 months has doubled, close to 23 percent. We're in the leaders' quadrant when it comes to virtualization capability. In the database side, we continue to lead in terms of usage, far outstripping Oracle and IBM with 48 percent, 47 percent share. We have a very secure database. We continue to lead the revolution when it comes to self-service BI and BI platform capabilities. And then with Windows Azure, we now have one year's worth of progress with tens of thousands of customers who are deploying solutions, ISVs who are deploying solutions, and hundreds being added every day. So, we have significant momentum, and it's all really thanks to the investments that this group of folks have made over the years. We're building on the core capabilities you already have across this broad product line, and the new capabilities you're adding. So, if you look at the private cloud capabilities over the last year, we've got many, many of you who have gotten the capabilities to deploy private clouds, the proof of concept, the design wins are rolling in; the pipeline for private clouds is very, very rich, even in the last six months. The SQL database is being incorporated by every ISV as part of their solution set. More important than that, we are now able to take those solutions that you've built on top of SQL Server and get design wins. We've had over 12,000 wins with SQL Server and your solutions over the last year. And with Windows Azure, we have a great start in terms of the number of people who have gotten now competencies to build cloud solutions using Azure, so we have over 30,000 of you who have gotten trained on Windows Azure capabilities. So, that's all fantastic momentum and we thank you very, very much for the commitment to the broad platform capabilities.
  • Slide Title / Description:Private Cloud Defined Key Points:How is the Private Cloud different?Cloud Attributes + Control and Customization Talk Track: The Private Cloud has all of the same benefits and attributes as we explained before – plus you also receive a high level of customization which provides you with the control enterprises need to address regulatory privacy and compliance requirements that wouldn’t be possible with Public Cloud services. These attributes aren’t necessarily due to proximity, the public / private distinction is not about location, we are only talking about computing models… but from globally shared resources with a public cloud to dedicated resources. A private cloud is a cloud, dedicated to you.
  • Talking points:The key design pillars for this next release of our System Center product is to make sure that it's all about the app, because that's what customers care about. When it comes to the applications, the things that we need to take into account from a management perspective is the ability to configure it, ability to monitor it, ability to update it, ability to move that application around. Those are the things that management software in concert with the application needs to deliver. Once you say that, things like cross-platform come naturally. So, of course we're going to be cross-platform at the hypervisor layer. We're going to be even cross-platform at the guest operating system layer because we recognize that customers are going to be heterogeneous. We want to make sure that we have the best performance for our workloads on top of our hypervisor, bar none. Today with SQL Server, with SharePoint, with Exchange, we have great performance data and we'll continue to push the envelope on it.We also will span public and private because hybrid IT is what customers are going to have. It's not as if they will only have private clouds or only have public clouds; both of these will be in parallel deployed in every customer's case.
  • Transition from previous slideSo what does this cloud transformation mean to you (i.e. the enterprise)?Goal of this slideFrame the cloud computing opportunity for the enterprise and Microsoft’s cloud and datacenter management vision to address that opportunity. Key Points to landSpotlight the players in the IT as a Service conversation within the enterprise (call out the “app leader” and the “ops leader” in the room)Talk about their motivations and how they’re typically non-compatibleIT as a Service is the mental model around which the app leader and the ops leader come together as consumer and provider respectivelyTalk about how the System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management vision uniquely addresses IT as a Service in the context of private and public cloud computing Talking Points (progressive builds) Cloud Computing is emerging as a major disruptive force in shaping the nature of business and IT conversations. Cloud Computing enables what we call “IT as a Service” which represents IT as being delivered to the business in a manner that’s agile & cost-effective while meeting the quality of service (QoS) parameters that the business has come to expect today. A cloud service demonstrates attributes like self-service, metered by use, elasticity and scalability. Now, any “as a Service” offering by definition has a “Service Provider” and “Service Consumer”. Simplistically speaking, service consumer is represented by business interests while service provider is represented by IT. These constituencies are incented around different KPIs – for e.g. a business/app owner would care about time to market, costs and ease of use, & simplicity whereas IT optimizes for security, compliance, process controls and availability. To align these interests, we need a mechanism to deliver the agility that the business needs while ensuring the operational efficiencies that IT cares about most. Enter IT as a Service. IT as a Service provides the framework for the service level based agreement between IT and the business stakeholders. Microsoft’s cloud and datacenter management vision is to deliver: Common Management experiences across private and public cloudsDeliverIT as a Service on your termswith flexible, management across your hybrid environmentsHow? With a set of integrated capabilities (see bottom row of the slide).
  • Transition from previous slideLet’s look at the history of System Center in the datacenter and connect the dots backward and forward, leading into the cloud era. Goal of this slideA look-back at System Center in the datacenter. Key Messages to landMicrosoft is not new to the Systems Management business. We’ve been around for 15+ years. So we understand your datacenter challenges and have the capability to solve them for you. Fastest growing STB business showing our customer’s trust on usSystem Center is a broad and deep portfolio of solutions that holistically covers your datacenter – from physical to virtual to cloud, from hardware to hypervisors to OS to applications.System Center is not only about Windows – we are committed to supporting your heterogeneous environments – be it hypervisors, management toolsets, cross-platform monitoring etc.Going forward, we’re increasingly investing for private and public cloud scenarios while carrying over our physical and virtual management goodness. Talking points17000 System Center Operations Manager enterprise customers (started as Microsoft Operations Manager or MOM)Significant usage of System Center Configuration Manager (or SMS as it was called earlier) for inventory, patching Recent acquisitions like Opalis & AVIcode further strengthen our portfolio
  • For context, our target audience through this conversation is the CIO, Operations leader (CIO -1) & Applications leader (CIO -1). We characterize the Operations leader as our “Service Provider” and the Applications leader as our “Service Consumer”. Goal of this slideRepresents core messaging that differentiates us from VMwareKey Messages to landLand the 3 differentiated pillars mentioned aboveDepending upon customer’s unique situation, leverage the narrative below for maximum impactTalking PointsCloud Computing is emerging as a major disruptive force in shaping the nature of business and IT conversations. Cloud Computing enables what we call “IT as a Service” which represents IT as being delivered to the business in a manner that’s agile & cost-effective while meeting the quality of service (QoS) parameters that the business has come to expect today. A cloud service demonstrates attributes like self-service, metered by use, elasticity and scalability. Now, any “as a Service” offering by definition has a “Service Provider” and “Service Consumer”. Simplistically speaking, service consumer is represented by business interests while service provider is represented by IT. These constituencies are incented around different KPIs – for e.g. a business/app owner would care about time to market, costs and ease of use, & simplicity whereas IT optimizes for security, compliance, process controls and availability. To align these interests, we need a mechanism to deliver the agility that the business needs while ensuring the operational efficiencies that IT cares about most.  Enter System Center 2012.  System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions empower you with a common management toolset for your private and public cloud applications and services. System Center helps you confidently deliver IT as a Service for your business.Productive Infrastructure System Center 2012 helps you deliver flexible and cost effective infrastructure with what you already know and own. You can simplify and standardize your (likely) fragmented/ heterogeneous datacenter environment using process automation. Using the System Center 2012 provisioning capability combined with the flexible delegation and control we offer, you can pool and abstract your datacenter resources and deliver self-service infrastructure to your business units in a private cloud computing model.  Heterogeneous supportTo help you carry forward your existing datacenter investments and skillsets, System Center 2012 offers integrated management for your heterogeneous datacenter environments. In effect, you can start your journey to the private cloud from where you are today. E.g. we offer multi hypervisor management (with System Center Virtual Machine Manager for VMware vSphere and Citrix XenServer), cross platform monitoring of Linux/Unix/Sun Solaris guests (with System Center Operations Manager), cross platform configuration management (Linux/Unix server with System Center Configuration Manager) & integrated automation across management toolsets from vendors like HP, CA, BMC, EMC and even VMWare (with System Center Orchestrator).  Process automation System Center 2012 helps you simplify and standardize your datacenter with a flexible process automation platform that helps your private cloud readiness while lowering costs and improving datacenter service reliability. With System Center Orchestrator 2012, you can integrate and extend your existing toolsets to build flexible workflows (or runbooks) that can span across multiple organizational silos and systems, which are then executed using orchestrated automation. System Center Service Manager 2012, offers industry standard service management capabilities (based on ITIL/MOF) which automates core organizational process workflows like incident management, problem management, change management, and release management. Self-service infrastructure With the provisioning capability of System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012, you can pool and abstract your datacenter resources (i.e. compute, network, and storage) into a private cloud infrastructure fabric. Following which, Operations Manager and Virtual Machine Manager combine to keep your fabric healthy and robust. Now that your infrastructure is well taken care of, you can allocate/delegate this pooled datacenter capacity to your business unit IT organizations in a flexible yet controlled manner using Virtual Machine Manager 2012 and the all-familiar identity and access services provided by Active Directory. Application owners can consume capacity (and even request additional capacity) in a self-service mode using the service catalog offered by Service Manager 2012. Predictable ApplicationsSystem Center 2012 enables you to holistically manage your application services, which is where your core business value resides. Deep application monitoring and diagnosisSystem Center Operations Manager 2012 offers deep application and transaction monitoring insight for .Net applications (and J2EE application server) to maximize their availability and performance. Operations Manager also integrates with Visual Studio through a connector to unlock seamless “dev-ops” collaboration, thereby helping you remediate application issues faster which results in predictable SLAs delivery. Easy to use reporting and dash-boarding allows you track and communicate your SLAs more effectively. Additionally, System Center Advisor enables you maximize workload/server performance and availability with proactive configuration assessments and best practice configuration recommendations. Comprehensive  application manageability Server Application Virtualization (SAV), which is part of System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012, optimizes your existing applications for private cloud deployments with sequenced state separation between the application and underlying infrastructure, acting as a bridge in your journey to the cloud.SAV dramatically simplifies application servicing (i.e. upgrades and/or maintenance) with image based configuration and management techniques that reduce administrative effort and expense. System Center Configuration Manager 2012 supports SAV, thereby extending the benefits of SAV to applications and workloads that may be deployed in physical/traditional environments. Through SAV support, Configuration Manager 2012 enables easier physical- to-virtual application mobility and in-place application servicing.Service centric approach[Here “Service” == Application + virtual infrastructure (storage, network, compute) + Knowledge (health, configuration, compliance etc.)]System Center 2012 offers a service centric approach to help you maximize business impact while also unlocking application mobility in a controlled manner between your cloud environments when it’s time. From provisioning services (visualization, design, composition, deployment & configuration) to operating them (monitoring, remediation, upgrades), we help you manage the full lifecycle.   Your Cloud System Center 2012 empowers you to deliver and consume private and public cloud computing on your terms, with common management experiences across your hybrid environments. Flexibility with delegation and controlConstruct and manage clouds across multiple customer datacenters, multiple infrastructures (e.g. Microsoft & VMware), and service providers (e.g. Windows Azure). Provide delegated authority and tools to enable self-service flexibility across your hybrid environments. Your IT Pro organization retains centralized control across your private and public cloud environments, which is important for enterprise security and compliance requirements while ensuring IT pros have a key role even as your organization adopts cloud computing models. Applications self-service across clouds System Center 2012 empowers your application and service owners with a common self-service experience across private cloud and public cloud computing models. With System Center App Controller 2012, we give you full visibility and control of your private and public cloud applications and services, so you can confidently adopt Windows Azure as your enterprise Platform as a Service (PaaS) choice.  Physical, virtual & cloud managementSystem Center has historically been known for physical and virtual management in the datacenter. You can also use your familiar on-premises System Center Operations Manager to monitor your Windows Azure applications (Windows Azure Application Monitoring Management Pack is in RC status now) – thus extending your common management experience to the cloud. With App Controller, we provide you with a single pane of glass with self-service flexibility and control for your application owners to manage their applications and services across private and public clouds (Windows Azure). We believe hybrid environments will be the norm over the next few years. A common management toolset with integrated Physical, Virtual, IaaS & PaaS management will help you optimize ROI.
  • Talking pointsTransition from previous slideLet’s see how System Center can help you make our vision real.  Goal of this slideFrame the requirements & capabilities needed to realize IT as a Service in hybrid environments and how System Center 2012 components deliver on those.  Key Points to landLand the connection with our vision from the previous slide – how our common management experiences help deliver IT as a Service across customers’ Hybrid environments System Center address all the capabilities required to deliver private and hybrid models of computing – self-service, service models, process automation, provisioning and configuration, monitoring & datacenter resource management Walk through an application service lifecycle end-to-end to make it come alive for the audience.  Talking Points (progressive builds)<click> Let’s trace back to the two personas we discussed earlier. What we’re going to first discuss are the capabilities required to deliver a private cloud as well as leverage hybrid computing models. <click> Firstly, you need a “simple” self-service experience to enable your application owners specify their service requirements. Let’s say the “consumer” trying to provision a SharePoint service with the following spec: 3 tier .NET architectureHas a set of configuration and deployment parameters to conform with (e.g. perf thresholds, scale out rules, update domains)Needs 99.95% availability SLAAdheres to compliance/security controls around SOX/HIPAA Need on-demand reporting on key availability metrics that track against SLA<click> Next, you need a way to understand the topology and architecture of the application service in question. An application deployed in cloud computing model is called a “service”. This would necessitate a “service model” that accurately binds the application’s architecture to the underlying resources where it will be hosted. The “service model” would be comprised of: Service definition information, deployed as “roles”. Roles are like DLLs, i.e. a collection of code with an entry point that runs in its own virtual machineFront end: e.g. load-balanced stateless web serversMiddle worker tier: e.g. order processing, encodingBackend storage: e.g. SQL tables or filesService Configuration informationUpdate domainsAvailability domains Scale out rules<click> You will need a set of process automation capabilities to break down this application provisioning request into the enterprise change requests that need to be implemented. This could include setting up the underlying infra and then a set of app configuration/release requests that need to be tracked (and ideally implemented with orchestrated automation)<click> Next you need a set of provisioning tools that actually configure and deploy the infra and application layers.<click> the underlying datacenter resources could be physical, virtual, IaaS or PaaS based, as per the requirements dictated by the application’s service model <click> once the application service is deployed, it would immediately need to be “discovered” and monitored for reporting and health (performance and availability) tracking<click> There you see how the System Center 2012 components offer these life cycle management capabilities in combination to help you deliver hybrid IT as a Service as per your organization’s requirements: App Controller would offer that self-service experience that allows your application owners manage their apps across private and public environments. Service Manager offers the standardized self-service catalog that defines “templates” for your applications and infrastructure. App Controller, Virtual Machine Manager, Service Manager and Operations Manager work together to maintain the service model through the application service life cycleOrchestrator and Service Manager offer orchestrated automation for the process workflows required to drive your provisioning and monitoring toolsVirtual Machine Manager and Configuration manager can provision physical, virtual and cloud environmentsOperations Manager (AVIcode capabilities will be built into Operations Manager 2012) monitors your application services end to end and offers deep app insight to help you deliver predictable SLAYour datacenter resources could be deployed anywhere from physical boxes to virtual to private to public with Windows Server/ Hyper-V and Windows Azure However, to get to this agile self-service end-state, you will have to start with abstracting your infrastructure and allocating it appropriately so that your business units can deploy and manage their applications on top. We will see how in the subsequent sections of this presentation.  
  • What’s new in App Controller as regards self-service? Common applications self-service console across cloudsSpan multiple VMM serversRegister and consume capacity from multiple Windows Azure subscriptionsEnable multiple users authenticated using enterprise AD to access single Windows Azure subscription Application deployment and configuration Deploy and manage Services and VMs on private clouds created with Virtual Machine Manager and Windows AzureCopy service templates (and resources) from one Virtual Machine Manager server to anotherCopy Windows Azure configuration, package files and VHDs between Windows Azure subscriptions What’s new in Service Manager as regards self-service? Service catalog Customizable request processRole based access Service request fulfillment 
  • What’s new in Virtual Machine Manager as regards Service Model?  Service templatesServer Application Virtualization (SAV) - SAV dramatically simplifies maintaining standardized application services in your private cloud. SAV optimizes your applications (including a subset of existing applications) for private cloud deployments with sequenced state separation between the application and underlying virtual infrastructure. Further, it dramatically simplifies upgrades and maintenance with image-based configuration and management techniques that reduce administrative effort and expense.  What’s new in Operations Manager as regards Service Model?Understanding of service dependencies with holistic monitoring of the serviceWhat’s new in Service Manager as regards Service Model?CMDB is still the place where all interdependencies and service relationships are maintained and updated.  What’s new in App Controller as regards Service Model?Visualize, configure and deploy application services in private (Virtual Machine Manager based) and public clouds (Windows Azure) 
  • What’s new in Orchestrator as regards process automation? Rich Integration and extensibility New integration packs for System Center 2012 componentsThird party integration pack refresh (with support for Windows Server 2008 R2)ODATA web services support for third party integrationExpanded PowerShell support  Automated orchestration for core private cloud scenarios such as provisioning & monitoring What’s new in Service Manager as regards process automation? IT service managementRelease management Reporting and dashboardsCentralized data warehouseEasy to use authoring  Integrated management (enabled by CMDB) Orchestrator run book connectorVMM service template connector
  • What’s new in Virtual Machine Manager as regards provisioning (for virtual environments)?Provision flexible and cost effective IaaSProvision bare metal to fabric in a few clicks: Pool and allocate datacenter resources (storage/ network/ compute cluster) Bare metal server deploymentFlexible delegation & role based access controlService centric approach Service templatesImage based managementServer App-Virtualization (SAV)Multi-hypervisor supportUnified management for Hyper-V, VMware vSphere 4.1 & Citrix XenServer virtualized environmentsOptimize service deliveryDynamic optimization based on workload demandsExpanded PowerShell supportOVF support SMI-S storage support What does Configuration manager continue to offer as regards provisioning physical servers? Traditional/Physical server & in-guest provisioningConfiguration Manager offers end to end bare metal OS provisioning for physical servers, including image capture, image delivery and rich task sequencing engine (with pre-created OS provisioning tasks). The Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) can help further optimize OS deployments in conjunction with Configuration Manager. Desired Configuration Management (DCM)To facilitate compliance and change control, Configuration manager provides the ability to define, monitor and remediate configuration drift for physical systems. This includes in-guest DCM & driving compliance by managing configuration drift InventoryConfiguration Manager offers hardware inventory (WMI based) and software inventory capabilities. Integrated with asset intelligence cloud service to enable meaningful business analysis of inventory data.  
  • What’s new in Data Protection Manager 2012? Centralized management consoleMonitoring, troubleshooting and remediation from single pane of glassRemotely manage DPM infrastructureRole based access Extensibility & data de-duplicationFull application protection Restore as filesIntegration with key de-duplication vendors Enhanced best-of-breed protection for Hyper-V, Exchange, SharePoint & SQLItem level recovery for Hyper-V and SharePointNear continuous host level backup Roadmap for Windows Azure VM role will be announced and updated later in H2 CY11 
  • What’s new in Operations Manager? Deep application monitoring & diagnostics; “dev-ops”End-to-end transaction monitoring Monitor .Net apps (AVIcode)Monitor Java application serversJava applications management pack framework for third parties Network MonitoringNetwork topology discoveryNetwork troubleshooting Easy to create, use and share SLA dashboards and reports Full integration of AVIcode capabilities into Operations Manager (With System Center 2012, AVIcode will no longer exist standalone)
  • Transition from previous slideDouble-click System Center 2012: Let’s now discuss pillar #1 in some more detail. Goal of this slideRepresents the infrastructure conversation – could be IaaS or integrated datacenter infrastructure management. Again, focus in on this pillar depending upon customer scenario. Key Messages to landLand our differentiation with System Center Orchestrator for broad/deep datacenter and cloud automation Land cross-platform and heterogeneous support with System Center Use physical management as appropriate, mostly for VMware differentiation {and “Big 4” (HP, BMC, CA and IBM) parity}It’s OK even if the customer is a VMware advocate, in which case, this pillar will neutralize the VMware advantage with pockets of differentiation (as per the above bullets)Talking PointsProductive Infrastructure System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions helps you deliver agile and cost effective Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) today with what you already know and own. We also offer best-of-breed management for your business critical Microsoft server workloads (e.g. optimize performance, scale and data protection for Sharepoint, Exchange, SQL). Finally, we support your heterogeneous datacenter investments. Heterogeneous supportTo help you optimally leverage your existing datacenter investments, System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions support heterogeneous datacenter management. For e.g. we offer multi hypervisor management (with System Center Virtual Machine Manager for VMware vSphere 4.1 and CirtixXenserver), cross platform monitoring of Linux/Unix guests (with System Center Operations Manager), cross platform configuration management (with System Center Configuration Manager) & integrated automation across management toolsets from traditional vendors (with System Center Orchestrator).Process automation System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions offer IT process automation with orchestrated workflows across systems and tasks (with System Center Orchestrator). This enables you lower costs and improve datacenter service reliability. With System Center Service Manager, We also offer industry standard service management capabilities (based on ITIL/MOF) which automates core datacenter processes like incident management, problem management, change management, and release Management. Self-service infrastructure With System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions, you can create a private cloud today thus optimizing usage of your datacenter investments. You can pool & dynamically allocate your datacenter resources (i.e. compute, network, and storage) enabling a service catalog based self-service experience for your business, with appropriate role based identity and access (as enabled by Active Directory and the Virtual Machine Manager administrator console). Presenting the slide buildsClick 1: Shows fragmented and heterogeneous datacenters – including storage, network, compute and a bunch of tools/people. The purpose of this build is to land the message that we’re meeting our customers where they are currently. We’re also acknowledging that the customer likely has some investments in VMware too. Paint the picture of customers’ existing datacenter infrastructure, management toolsets, processes and organization. Make this a broad conversation. Spend a lot of time here to understand the customer’s current state of affairs by asking probing questions. Click 2: Shows the current infrastructure abstracted into a private cloud fabric (we’ve used the “blanket” metaphor to demonstrate that “magic”). Now, you might not want to position this as pure magic, depending upon what you got from the conversation in the previous click. Be realistic that this is not an easy process and it has to be a holistic combination of change involving processes, people and systems/tools. That said, we absolutely provide the capability to help you achieve this level of abstracted standardization with System Center 2012. How? With VMM can help you provision your fabric across multiple underlying hypervisors. As part of provisioning, Orchestrator provides process automation allowing for data transfer between System Center and other management toolsets your customer might have invested in (including from VMware). Click 3: Shows an infrastructure issue being discovered and remediated by optimizing the fabric. We don’t stop with just provisioning your private cloud fabric. We also help you keep it healthy and robust thereby helping you deliver reliable datacenter services. How? Operations Manager 2012 provides robust monitoring across your complete private cloud environment – across compute, networks and storage and across Microsoft and other platforms like Unix/Linux/Sun Solaris/…. – thus leaving you with no blind spots in keeping on top of your entire datacenter infrastructure. What makes System Center compelling though is integrated management – you could imagine Operations Manager proactively discovering any issues in your private cloud infrastructure, Virtual Machine Manager 2012 performing dynamic optimization to match your infrastructure to what your applications and workloads need; underneath all this being Orchestrator and Service Manager that drive automated process workflows across all such tools and systems to resolve the issue. Click 4: Shows the fabric being broken up for your line-of-business organization’s use. Think of these being “mini-clouds” based on each of those organization’s requirements. While this specific example shows them being broken out by LOBs, you could just as well think of these as being “dev” “test” and “production” mini-clouds (or even geography based mini-clouds) depending upon the organizational unit that your customer needs. Virtual Machine Manager allows this flexible delegation of clouds with the right level of control between the service provider and service consumer. Click 5: The marketing business unit needs more capacity during it’s peak time of year. Business units can flexibly submit requests for additional cloud capacity in a self-service model, with the right level of control to ensure enterprise change management procedures are followed.
  • Transition from previous slideDouble-click System Center 2012: Let’s now discuss pillar #2 in some more detail. Goal of this slideThis pillar represents our “service centric” private cloud differentiation versus VMware. You should spend a lot of time on this vignette of the customer conversation. Key Messages to land“It’s all about your applications and services, not servers or VMs” – applications are what your business really cares about. Microsoft is way ahead of VMware in understanding and managing your applications and services. Core business value lies in your applications and we provide you deep application insight. We don’t stop at just managing infrastructure or virtual machines, which is where VMware is at. Through System Center, we’re bringing our learning from building & operating public cloud services to your private cloudTalking Points: Predictable ApplicationsSystem Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions help you holistically manage your application and services, which is where core business value resides. Service centric approach<Here Service = Application + Infrastructure (e.g. virtual storage, network, compute) + Knowledge (health, configuration, compliance etc.)>System Center cloud and datacenter management solutions offer a service centric approach to help you maximize business impact while also unlocking application mobility in a controlled manner between your cloud environments when it’s time. From provisioning services (visualization, design, composition, deployment & configuration) to operating them (monitoring, remediation, upgrades), we help you manage the full lifecycle.   Comprehensive  application manageability Server Application Virtualization (SAV), which is part of System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012, optimizes your existing applications for private cloud deployments with sequenced state separation between the application and underlying infrastructure, acting as a bridge in your journey to the cloud.SAV simplifies application servicing with image based configuration and management techniques that reduce administrative effort and expense.  Deep application monitoring and diagnosisSystem Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions (with System Center Operations Manager 2012 and AVIcode) offer e2e transaction monitoring for .Net/J2EE applications to maximize availability and performance. This also unlocks seamless & agile “dev-ops” collaboration scenarios, thereby improving performance against your SLAs commitments to the business. Easy to use reporting and dash-boarding allows you track and communicate your SLAs more effectively. Additionally, System Center Advisor enables you maximize workload/server performance and availability with proactive configuration assessments and best practice configuration recommendations.  Presenting the slide buildsClick 1: All about your applications and services. You can see the familiar IIS/Web, business/app tier and data/SQL tiers? Microsoft has a deep understanding of application and cloud service models. Microsoft builds the world’s most popular .Net application development framework which is very likely being used to build LOB apps in your organization. Click 2 & 3: Shows service model requirements being specified by the application administrator – for e.g. application topology/architecture, scale out rules, health thresholds etc., similar to how a developer would specify for a Windows Azure app. Except in this case, we are talking about a service that will be deployed to your private cloud. Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) 2012 service designer interface you see here. VMM thus allows the application administrator to work with the fabric administrator and provision the service to the private cloud fabric. Click 4: Shows configuration parameters being supplied followed by service deployment. The compelling visualization depicts an application owner making modifications to a service through System Center codename “Concero” (provisioned earlier with VMM). Click 5: Shows one component of the service having some health issues and being remediated using deep application diagnostics. You could imagine the issue being proactively discovered by the application support staff (“ops”), who’d then send all the detailed application trace to the concerned development team (“dev”) for inspection and issue resolution. Imagine the amount of time/effort this streamlined approach would save, ultimately resulting in faster responsiveness to your business SLA. Click 6: Shows the level of deep line-of-code level application insight that System Center offers through AVIcode, which will be integrated into Operations Manager 2012. Click 7: Service restored back to original state. End with reinforcing our ‘service centric” message.
  • Transition from previous slideDouble-click System Center 2012: Let’s now discuss pillar #3 in some more detail. Goal of this slideThis pillar represents our differentiated “common” private and public cloud management message, relative to VMware. You should spend a lot of time on this vignette of the customer conversation. Key Messages to landMicrosoft is committed to be with you on your journey to the cloud - on your terms. Microsoft recognizes your “hybrid” reality – we understand you will likely want to invest in physical, virtual, private and public cloud computing models. With System Center, Microsoft offers one common management toolset, which spans across all of the above computing models. We offer you tremendous value with one integrated cloud and datacenter management offer. Talking Points: Your Cloud System Center 2012 cloud and datacenter management solutions empower you to deliver and consume private and public cloud computing on your terms, with common management experiences across your hybrid environments. Flexibility with delegation and controlConstruct and manage clouds across multiple customer datacenters, multiple infrastructures (e.g. Microsoft & VMware), and service providers (e.g. Windows Azure). Provide delegated authority and tools to enable self-service flexibility.  Common console across clouds System Center cloud and datacenter management solutions empower your application and service owners with a common self-service experience across private cloud and public cloud computing models. With System Center codename “Concero”, we give you full visibility and control of your private and public cloud applications and services, so you can confidently adopt Windows Azure as your Platform as a Service (PaaS) choice.  Physical, virtual & cloud managementSystem Center has historically been known for physical and virtual management in the datacenter. You can also use your familiar on-premises System Center Operations Manager to monitor your Windows Azure applications (Windows Azure Application Monitoring Management Pack is in RC status now) – thus extending your common management experience to the cloud. With “Concero”, we provide you with a single pane of glass with self-service flexibility and control for your application owners to manage their applications and services across private and public clouds (Windows Azure). We believe “hybrid” environments will be the norm over the next few years. A common management toolset with integrated Physical, Virtual, IaaS & PaaS management will help you optimize ROI.Presenting the slide buildsClick 1 & 2: Shows that cloud computing as a journey. We want to land an evolutionary message. We don’t want to use words like “transition to the cloud” – we should instead, talk about how customers can build on what they have to consume the power of cloud computing on their own terms without losing control. Our audience comprises enterprise IT decisions makers, who by nature aren’t fans of revolutionary change. Click 3: Shows how the mix of computing models will change over the next few years. To be clear, we only want to land the increasing trend around cloud computing adoption (versus getting into debate about the data behind the distribution model mix). Click 4: Shows System Center codename “Concero” as a strong proof point to help you consumer the full power of cloud computing “on your terms”. Click 5: Following up on the above click, we show complete empowerment for the app owner, which is enabled by the controlled delegation we offer to your IT Pro. Click 6/7/8: Shows how the app owner gets full visibility and control to their apps – be they virtual, private or public (Windows Azure). Click 9: Reinforce our “single pane of glass” message across private and public.
  • TR13 sessions on ITSM for Private Cloud-MODCT317-VIR310On the left, you see the traditional datacenter, and as you move to the right, that is the full software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering, such as Office 365 or Windows Intune. As you move to the right, you’re giving up control, as you move to the right, your trust in someone else (vendors) increases. When we talk about private cloud, we’re taking some of those components and moving them into the shared private cloud infrastructure.  In the private cloud model, within the organization, business units are effectively giving up certain amount of control and placing their trust in IT to effectively manage this infrastructure in hopes of realizing all the compelling benefits of private cloud we discussed earlier – agility, economy, etc.
  • What is IT service management? It’s a discipline for the overall management of an IT service environment. With ITSM we’re moving available from managing technology to managing technology-enabled services. The idea is to move IT providers away from that technology-centered focus to really being business / customer focused.  In the end, customers don’t by technology for the features, but for the fulfillment of a need. When someone buys a drill bit, it's not the drill bit the customer wants, it's the hole. People buy to satisfy a need. No one is willing to pay for a product or service that doesn’t deliver the promised results. For a private cloud solution to deliver the required benefits requires more than just the technology. It requires a holistic approach bringing together technology and people together with processes for managing how these components work together….it’s a service chain. With Microsoft private cloud, to quote the drill analogy, we are selling capability to meet that need, the quarter inch hole. The drill that a change, we will change out Service Manager 2010 for Service Manager 2012, VMM 2008 for VMM 2012. But in the end, the customer is buying the same thing; all the promised benefits of a properly implemented Private Cloud - agility, economy, scalability, etc.
  • The private cloud the need for ITSM doesn't go away, but there are some key principles that drive new thinking in the customer. Perception of infinite capacityPerception of continuous availabilityPredictability: remove as much variation as possible Service provider’s approach to delivering infrastructure: infrastructure on demand. It’s important for IT to realize that they are delivering service and the customer can go get it somewhere else. Nobody wants to pay for the service that doesn't deliver the promised benefits.Resiliency over redundancy - will talk more about this in a minuteMinimize human involvement - Automating the right processes in the right areas. We all understand not everything can be automated. They're still decision points where qualified people need to determine the direction.Optimize resource usage - we don't want an abundance of excess capacity, and we have to strike a balance with that perception of infinite capacity. We have to have idle capacity for the ebbs and flows in demand, but not too much… an optimal amountIncentivize desired resource consumption behavior - Basically this means how we can implement the model in a way that influences consumption.
  • See: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/private-cloud-planning-guide-for-operations.aspx The drive for resiliency requires a different approach to troubleshooting incidents. Extensive troubleshooting of incidents in production negatively impacts resiliency. Therefore, if an incident cannot be quickly resolved, the service can be rolled back to the previous version, as described under Release and Deployment. Further troubleshooting can be done in a test environment without impacting the production environment. Troubleshooting in the production environment may be limited to moving the service to different hosts (ruling out infrastructure as the cause) and rebooting the VMs. If these steps do not resolve the issue, the rollback scenario could be initiated. Redundancy: Where a system has been designed to eliminate single points of failure, redundant Configuration Items (CIs) are those which can fail without affecting delivery of the service.Resilience: The capability of a set of Configuration Items (CIs) to continue to provide a required function, if not immediately then very quickly, when some CIs in the set have suffered a failure.Maintainability: A measure of how quickly and effectively a Configuration Item or IT Service can be restored to normal working after a Failure. Maintainability is an important concept to consider. Think about a pickup truck. In the Midwestern US, the pickup truck is very easy to maintain as compared to say, a Mercedes. A Mercedes may be more reliable, but it's not more maintainable in that situation. Move that scenario to New York City or Los Angeles and the reality is much different. 
  • Traditionally high availability needed expensive hardware redundancy. However, in a modern data center virtualization gives us the ability to move workloads from one server to another. If we manage that process well enough, with the right set of tools, the perception of that event is that the outage is so short the end-user doesn't notice. That's resiliency. In the event of failure, restoration to another location is so timely that the shortness of the failure event may be perceived as continuous availability.  It is the evolution of superior maintainability to a point where it unavailability is not perceived.
  • As you look at the terms on the slide, you'll notice that I don't processes in here and some MOF terminology mixed in. In a private cloud environment, there's a lot of overlap is processes. When you're working with a customer helping them with Private Cloud adoption, you want to make sure they understand which processes are going to be important for the success.  This doesn't mean we need to take a customer from ground zero to total process maturity overnight, but we do have to help them the basics needed to support the private cloud. In a Private Cloud solution, there's a high degree of automation and we need to know when to trigger those automated processes. Without a service catalog and service offerings, we can't automate provisioning. We have to capture the request somewhere. Without incident and problem management, we can't automate remediation. Without monitoring and management we can't identify the impact or outage that is the source of our incident in the first place.
  • This concept of people process and technology has been around for a long time. Never has it been more important than it is for private cloud. Technology evolves quickly, but the people and the processes don't change all that much. ITSM has matured over time, but methodologies and best practices for IT service management a pretty well-defined and well known. Whether you choose MOF or ITIL, what you need to do to be successful is not a secret. In an environment leveraging traditional virtualization, you can get away with a certain degree of process immaturity. The firefighting mentality can persist and sometimes may even be good enough to go unnoticed. But this all changes when we move into a Private Cloud infrastructure. With high levels of automation, very fast response (to incidents, service requests, etc), enforces an organization to advance it process management capabilities pretty quickly.
  • Managing a service is not a trivial process. It requires a combination of capable people with the right mindset and processes that can drive a predictable result. So we have to define the areas of responsibility and we have to determine who is responsible for each area. MOF defines seven areas of responsibility, as well as role types within each of these areas of responsibility, ultimately defining all of the important areas of process responsibility and accountability within an IT organization.  An ideal organization would have the seven areas of responsibility in place and roles and responsibilities properly assigned. In the real world very few organizations have all of this in place. People within an IT organization are often confused about what processes are important, and even when they know getting someone assigned as responsible for a given process to achieve a predictable outcome is not necessarily an easy task. When an organization moves from traditional virtualization for private cloud environment, they need to take some time to consider how this affects roles and responsibilities and how they are assigned today.
  • Let's talk about some of the issues that are typically seeing another affected by moving to a cloud-based environment. I'll talk about service dependencies through an example - a nice meal at a restaurant.  If the meal is the service, and you go to a very nice restaurant to have a meal been waiting for, for a very long time, you have a certain set of expectations about what that meal is going to look like and taste like when it comes out. But the services required for that meal to live up to your expectations as a whole set of service dependencies and requirements.  First, you have to a waiter capable of taking your order in understanding your specific requirements, customizations and preferences, which can be difficult.Next, your order has to be well communicated to the chef is going to prepare it.Someone has to supply the chef of the ingredients required to make that dinner, and those ingredients have to be a certain quality.All the equipment the chef requires to prepare a meal after the working order (stove, mixer, blender, etc).Someone also has to ensure there are clean plates the server that meal on. And the same goes for IT service. There all sorts of dependencies that has to be understood and well described and known to the right people in order for that service to be delivered successfully. Typically in traditional environments, this is often lacking and these elements are vaguely defined, not documented, not linked to processes. Changes to these components are often not controlled to a process that properly evaluates the impact of how change of one component affects the service as a whole.
  • Microsoft adds a services offering, the Proactive Operations Program (POP) across a number of disciplines, such as service management, change and configuration management, incident management, etc. to help customers assess where they are today, their desired future state and plan for how to reach their goal.
  • Managing an IT Operations environment is very complex, regardless of the skill level or work experience of the service managers and administrators. Quite often a high rate of staff turnover exists, day-to-day work is very reactive in nature, and knowledge sharing is very difficult with under-utilized or non-existent documentation.  As the business continues to rely increasingly upon IT Operations to support critical functions, the need for improved service availability also increases. Typically, IT looks to increased capability provided by hardware and software solutions to support this need. Not surprisingly, Operations staff is more heavily relied upon to ensure consistent levels of service without the benefit of increasing headcount or improving skills to support these new technologies. This drives a reactive atmosphere that, in turn, leads to frustration, to important tasks not being completed, and to a higher staff turnover rate. The Microsoft Services Proactive Operations Program(POP) provides an accelerated implementation of Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF) and IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) core principles of Change and Configuration Management. Specifically, the Change and Configuration Management Proactive Operations Program helps IT groups: Create an environment where proactive focus drives daily, weekly, and monthly changes Ensure that the tasks being performed to operate IT services have been identified and documented Improve communication between teams using or managing the service Develop and maintain a method consistent documentation and communication for changes occurring within the environment
  • The Microsoft Proactive Operations Program for Incident Management provides your IT staff with specific recommendations and guidance to improve your Incident Management process. This solution is designed to help your IT team:  Improve the state of IT operations Decrease incident mean time to resolution Efficiently handle high impact incidents  Customer service is the key entry point from all areas of the business into IT. It is crucial that a sound incident management process be in place to drive satisfaction of IT throughout the business. The goal of this process is to provide a positive experience for users by meeting their IT needs and addressing complaints and issues that arise during the normal course of using an IT service.  During the delivery of the Proactive Operations Program, your IT operations will learn the methods and get the deliverables necessary to provide this experience to your business in an efficient, cost effective manner.
  • The roles and knowledge management version of the proactive operations program helps customers assess their situation around the roles and responsibilities we look at earlier.
  • It’s easiest to think of MAP in these terms: Agent-less Inventory and DiscoveryIt’s a Windows Forms application that sits on top of a SQL Server database. You don’t have to install anything beyond one machine to use it. As long as you have connectivity and credentials, it will find everything in your environment, as long as you have credentials with the permissions to see it. It retrieves a very rich set of hardware and software data without the need for an agent. It will discover not only Windows systems, but LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) as well. Multi-product Migration PlanningOnce you’ve discovered the data, MAP gives you different lenses through which to analyze the data. You can look at this through the different filters based on what you’re interested in. If Windows 7 migration is your target, there is a filter for that, if you’re interested in SQL migration, there’s a filter for that. Virtualization/Cloud SizingFor virtualization and cloud sizing, there is a second step you go through to collect performance data, and MAP Toolkit with present virtualization candidates and do a placement analysis. In addition to virtualization analysis, MAP also does cloud sizing now. If you have a customer buying reference hardware as part of the Hyper-V Cloud Fast Track program, you can analyze their infrastructure with that in mind – there’s a filter for that. It will also give your footprint on Azure if you’re moving an application for the public cloud (PaaS). Usage PlanningIf you need to assess licensing to see what your customers need, this is also possible with MAP. Core AudienceMAP was developed with two core audiences in mind – IT Pros and MS Partners. The bottom line is MAP can really accelerate the discovery and analysis processes not only for cloud, but for many different scenarios, so share this with your customers and partners to help them take advantage of this.
  • There is nothing unusual about how MAP collects data – it uses the same technologies as System Center, but’s it’s just inventorying rather than managing. WMI is the primary protocol, but it also uses Active Directory, windows networking a VMware server account to provide an inventory of VMware assets (think V2V to Hyper-V ), SSH (for the LAMP stack) and SQL Server credentials.
  • The reports provide extensive discovery data, but also a lot of guidance and accompanying text to put this into context. It’s a ready-made deliverable for your analysis, but also for presentation to others.  Interested in some sample reports, do a BING search for “MAP Toolkit Sample Reports download”.
  • These are not only reusable hardware profiles, but OEMs like those in the Hyper-V Cloud Fast Track program can provide a template to pre-populate their hardware profile.
  • Articulate the Microsoft vision of cloud computingDescribe the logical architecture of a private cloud infrastructure built on System Center 2012 technologiesExplain ITSM concepts applicable to provisioning, managing and maintaining a Microsoft Private cloud infrastructureDiscuss the business cases and benefits of System Center solutions for the DatacenterDescribe Microsoft customer and partner programs and incentives for Microsoft private cloud
  • System Center 2012 Data Center and Private Cloud Overview

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    7. 7. Web App Data
    8. 8. Service Mapping • do I need to notify about an upcoming outage?Who… • do I contact when a service I depend on goes down? • are my customers? • types of hardware are required?What… • versions of software are running in my service? • Other services could cause an outage in my service?Which… • Other services are affected if my service goes down?
    9. 9. Change and Configuration Management • Change Manager – manages activities of the processWho • Configuration Manager – ensures a known state at all times • Flexible process flowWhat • Common Taxonomy • Defined Roles and Responsibilities • Changes inherently bring riskWhy • Formal Change Mgmt must balance between benefit and cost
    10. 10. Customer Service & Incident Management • Incident Coordinator – owns quality control,Who oversees all incident requests • Escalations – defined routing of incidents • Structured, repeatable incident process flowWhat • Predictable escalation methodology • Defined Roles and Responsibilities • Escalation triggers are loosely definedWhy • SLAs need to adapt with outsourced infrastructure • Increased knowledge needed in level 1 responders
    11. 11. Roles and Knowledge Management • Technology Area Manager– ensures workWho instructions are carried out as intended • Ops staff assigned to roles for effective execution •Tasks and Work Instructions supplied by MicrosoftWhat •Cloud based tool to manage identified work •Defined Roles and Responsibilities • What proactive work to perform is unknownWhy • Staff turnover in administrator roles hard to manage • Customers need to streamline operations staff
    12. 12. Windows Server 2008 & Oracle R2 SyBase Hyper-V MySQL IE WindowsMigration 7 2010 Usage MicrosoftTracking Office Azure Linux and Migration VMWare SQL Server 2008 R2
    13. 13. MAP Tool User Customer Network
    14. 14. Proposal Detailed Report

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