The power of colors 2013

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The power of colors 2013

  1. 1. Color Matters Color affects you physically Color impacts marketing Color increases brand recognition Color boosts memory Color engages participation Color attracts attention
  2. 2. The Power of Colors Baker Miller pink- a color that's close to the bubble gum pink background color of this web page ( R:255, G:145, B:175) . Also known as: drunk tank pink," this color is used to calm violent prisoners in jails. Dr. Alexander Schauss, Ph.D., director of the American Institute for Biosocial Research in Tacoma Washington, was the first to report the suppression of angry, antagonistic, and anxiety ridden behavior among prisoners: "Even if a person tries to be angry or aggressive in the presence of pink, he can't. The heart muscles can’t race fast enough. It’s a tranquilizing color that saps your energy. Even the color-blind are tranquilized by pink rooms." (1) In spite of these powerful effects, there is substantial evidence that these reactions are short term. Once the body returns to a state of equilibrium, a prisoner may regress to an even more agitated state. 1. Morton Walker, The Power of Color, (New York, Avery Publishing Group, 1991), pp. 50-52
  3. 3. This room at the US Naval Correctional Facility in Seattle, Washington, was the first to be painted Baker-Miller pink (a.k.a. Schauss pink). Full spectrum fluorescent lights ensured that the color was not distorted. Courtesy Alexander Schauss.
  4. 4. Pink for peace? For one juvenile detention facility in Florida, it's worth a shot. According to a research paper published in 1981, Baker-Miller pink, a shade which is "kind of like Pepto- Bismol, only deeper," was found to lower heart rate, pulse, and respiration.
  5. 5. The status of pink football locker rooms today: University of Hawaii associate head coach saw visitor locker rooms at Iowa and Colorado State painted pink in the belief that the color made players passive. Now the WAC has a rule that a visiting team's locker room can not be painted a different color than the home team's. In other words, it can be pink, black or any color of the rainbow, as long as both locker rooms are the same color. Source: Honolulu Star Bulletin 10/24/99
  6. 6. Color and Marketing Research conducted by the secretariat of the Seoul International Color Expo 2004 : 92.6 percent said that they put most importance on visual factors when purchasing products. Only 5.6 percent said that the physical feel via the sense of touch was most important. Hearing and smell each drew 0.9 percent. Research reveals people make a subconscious judgment about a person, environment, or product within 90 seconds of initial viewing and that between 62% and 90% of that assessment is based on color alone. Source: CCICOLOR - Institute for Color Research Research by the Henley Centre suggests 73% of purchasing decisions are now made in-store. Consequently, catching the shopper's eye and conveying information effectively are critical to successful sales.
  7. 7. Color and Marketing Research conducted by the secretariat of the Seoul International Color Expo 2004 : 92.6 percent said that they put most importance on visual factors when purchasing products. Only 5.6 percent said that the physical feel via the sense of touch was most important. Hearing and smell each drew 0.9 percent. Research reveals people make a subconscious judgment about a person, environment, or product within 90 seconds of initial viewing and that between 62% and 90% of that assessment is based on color alone. Source: CCICOLOR - Institute for Color Research Research by the Henley Centre suggests 73% of purchasing decisions are now made in-store. Consequently, catching the shopper's eye and conveying information effectively are critical to successful sales.
  8. 8. Color and Brand Identity 1. Color increases brand recognition by up to 80 percent University of Loyola, Maryland study 2. Heinz Color influences brand identity in a variety of ways. Consider Heinz Blastin' Green ketchup. More than 10 million bottles were sold in the first seven months following its introduction. The result: $23 million in sales attributable to Heinz green ketchup [the highest sales increase in the brand's history]. All because of a simple color change. 3. Apple Computer Apple brought color into a marketplace where color had not been seen before. By introducing the colorful iMacs, Apple was the first to say, "It doesn't have to be beige". The iMacs reinvigorated a brand that had suffered $1.8 billion of losses in two years. (And now we have the colorful iPods.)
  9. 9. Color Increases Memory Psychologists have documented that "living color" does more than appeal to the senses. It also boosts memory for scenes in the natural world. By hanging an extra "tag" of data on visual scenes, color helps us to process and store images more efficiently than colorless (black and white) scenes, and to remember them better, too. Source: The findings were reported in the May 2002 issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, published by the American Psychological Association (APA) "The Contributions of Color to Recognition Memory for Natural Scenes," Felix A. Wichmann, Max-Planck Institut für Biologische Kybernetik and Oxford University; Lindsay T. Sharpe, Universität Tübingen and University of Newcastle; and Karl R. Gegenfurtner, Max-Plank Institut für Biologische Kybernetik and Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen; Journal of Experimental Psychology – Learning, Memory and Cognition, Vol 28. No.3., 5-May-2002
  10. 10. Color Engages and Increases Participation Ads in color are read up to 42% more often than the same ads in black and white (as shown in study on phone directory ads). Source: White, Jan V., Color for Impact, Strathmoor Press, April, 1997
  11. 11. Color Attracts Attention A colored image holds the attention for more than twice as long as a black and white image. People cannot process every object within view at one time. Therefore, color can be used as a tool to emphasize or de-emphasize areas. A Midwestern company used color to highlight key information on their invoices. As a result, they began receiving customer payments an average of 14 days earlier.
  12. 12. Additional Research 92% Believe color presents an image of impressive quality 90% Feel color can assist in attracting new customers 90% Believe customers remember presentations and documents better when color is used 83% Believe color makes them appear more successful 81% Think color gives them a competitive edge Source: Conducted by Xerox Corporation and International Communications Research from February 19, 2003 to March 7, 2003, margin of error of +/- 3.1%.
  13. 13. Consider the color choices for: • Breakfast cereals • Cars • Clothing • Restaurants • Buildings’ exteriors and interiors • What else conveys status/feeling/concept with color?

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