Learning module 4

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Learning module 4

  1. 1. Module 4
  2. 2. Overview:  Reminder: Post Rough Drafts of Literacy Narratives to the Writer’s Workshop Thread by February 3rd  Literacy Narrative Writing Activity to Support the Creation of Your Literacy Narrative  “Advice”  Chapter Two in Creating Literacy-Rich Schools for Adolescents  Abdurashid’s Story, pages 23-27  Seven Defensible Strategies Chapter Four in Mosaic of Thought Supplemental Readings  “Close Reading as an Intervention for Struggling Middle School Readers”  “’Spacecraft Reveals Recent Geological Activity on the Moon’: Exploring the Features of NASA Twitter Posts and Their Potential to Engage Adolescents”
  3. 3. “Advice” Writing Activity for the Literacy Narrative Imagine you have a younger brother or sister who is just starting college this fall. He/she has neglected his/her reading and writing but suddenly wants to get serious. Make a list of your ten best tips for becoming a better college reader and a better college writer. Select one tip to write more in depth about.What experiences in college have taught you these lessons? Write your advice and anecdotes in an engaging way with enough detail to be really helpful to this person whose success you care about.
  4. 4. Chapter Two in Creating Literacy Rich Schools for Adolescents: Essential Question for All Content Area Classes Essential Question: “Do all courses throughout a student’s day capitalize on the student’s literacy and language as a way to learn new information?” (p. 23). As you think about this question, consider how you could capitalize on your student’s literacy practices to learn new information.
  5. 5. Abdurashid’s Story Revisit Abdurashid’s Story on page 23. (I have also linked it in the module.) Revisit the essential question for this chapter: “Do all courses throughout a student’s day capitalize on the student’s literacy and language as a way to learn new information?” (p. 23).
  6. 6. Herbert Hoover High School and San Diego State University Participatory Action Research Project • “Content area classrooms should be organized around themes, big ideas, or essential questions” (p. 24). • “Students are expected to read and write in every class” • The general focus was on strategies for helping students read and write increasingly complex text. • Use better, readable texts to motivate students to read – “Using one grade-level textbook often ensures that students who struggle will have to rely on just listening to learn the required information” (p. 52). • Seven Defensible Strategies for Reading and Writing in All Content Areas – Transportable Literacy Strategies: • “Students use the strategies they learn in one class to comprehend in another” (p. 22). – Transparent Literacy Strategies: • “Strategies become part of the students’ thinking and students automatically apply the strategies ‘on the run’” (p. 22).
  7. 7. Seven Defensible Strategies for Reading and Writing in Content Area Classrooms (1) Anticipatory Activities (Activating Prior Knowledge) Anticipation Guides Quick Writes KWL Discussion (2) Read Alouds (Shared Reading where students see the text too) Teachers advised to read aloud for five minutes every day in every class. The purpose is to build background knowledge, develop vocabulary, foster a love of reading, and teach text structure. (3) Graphic Organizers (concept maps, flow diagrams, tree diagrams, matrices) (4) Vocabulary Instruction (5) Writing to Learn (6) Structured Note Taking (7) Reciprocal Teaching (Predicting, Questioning, Clarifying, Summarizing)
  8. 8. Example of a Graphic Organizer: KWL Charts Know Want to Know Learned Still Want to Learn Affective Domain
  9. 9. Structured Note Taking: Cornell Notes Divide your paper into two columns. 2. Leave the Left column blank. 3. Take notes over a lecture, reading, film, discussion etc. in the Right column. 4. Within an hour or two of completing notes, fill in the Left column with “recall” notes over the main idea, important details, questions you want to revisit etc. 1.
  10. 10. Sample Cornell Notes Definition of Personality Trait Personality trait = durable disposition to behave in a particular way in a variety of situations. Freud’s Theories Components of personality from Freud’s theories include mid-primitive, instinctive, ego-decision-making, levels of self awareness. Theories about the unconscious mind Unconscious thoughts , memories and desires are below the surface of conscious thoughts but have great influence on behavior. How does the unconscious mind communicate to the conscious mind? Jung developed a theory about a collective unconscious that contained shared archetypes across cultures and ancient civilizations, and contemporary society.
  11. 11. Reciprocal Teaching Activity Please refer to the policy brief titled “Literacies of Disciplines” and complete the following steps in the reciprocal teaching method. Begin with considering the title of this policy brief. Take a few minutes and think through writing about the title, “Literacies of Disciplines.” • What do these words make you think about? • What does this title make you think the policy brief is going to assert? • Convert the title into a question.
  12. 12. Reciprocal Teaching cont. Read the first paragraph. As you read, underline words you do not know. Summarize the main points of this paragraph. What questions does this paragraph raise for you? What do you need clarified in this passage? What does not make sense to you? What is the author going to discuss or assert next? (Predict)
  13. 13. Reciprocal Teaching Activity continued Read the next three paragraphs. Underline the words you do not know as you read. Summarize the main ideas of the paragraphs. What questions do these paragraphs raise for you? What do you need clarified in this passage? What does not make sense to you? What is the author going to discuss or assert next (predict)?
  14. 14. Reciprocal Teaching continued Read the remainder of the policy brief. Continue to underline words you do not know. Predict what the author will say in each paragraph as you read. In writing, summarize the main ideas of this policy brief. Jot down questions this policy brief raises for you. Look at the words you’ve underlined. Note the words you still feel uncertain about as well as concepts that are confusing to you and you would need to clarify. Discuss your reactions to the brief.
  15. 15. Pause and Reflect: What is reciprocal teaching? What are the steps that must be in place with this reading method? What are different ways a teacher could enact these steps (e.g., small groups, whole class, in a virtual setting)? When should a classroom teacher use this method? Why do you think this method has a proven research base of improving students’ reading comprehension in K-12 settings in every content area? What did you learn about reciprocal teaching from going through these steps?
  16. 16. Key Ideas about Reading Comprehension from Chapter Four in Mosaic of Thought Using Relevant Background Knowledge or Schema Activating prior knowledge at a conceptual level  Activating prior knowledge should be taught explicitly using a variety of texts over a long period of time  Six Types of Schema (page 100-101)  Gradual Release of Responsibility Model of Teaching for Teaching Comprehension Strategies Planning Phase  Early Phase  Middle Phase  Late Phase 
  17. 17. Writer’s Workshop Remember to respond to at least three rough drafts of literacy narratives posted to the writer’s workshop thread
  18. 18. Supplemental Readings Please take some time to read the following articles to add to the chapters assigned for this week. “Close Reading as an Intervention for Struggling Middle School Readers” “’Spacecraft Reveals Recent Geological Activity on the Moon’: Exploring the Features of NASA Twitter Posts and Their Potential to Engage Adolescents”

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