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Session 5, Rademacher

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CSR as Strategy?

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Session 5, Rademacher

  1. 1. Lars Rademacher, Nadine Remus Dept. M e dia Management, MHMK Munich CSR between leadership, communication strategy and management fashion. A (strictly) relational approach
  2. 2. <ul><li>I Introduction and problem </li></ul><ul><li>II Institutionalization of CSR in (or by) CSR research and practice </li></ul><ul><li>III Management Styles and CSR initiative </li></ul><ul><li>IV Role of management trainers within a management fashion cycle </li></ul><ul><li>V Project frame and methodology </li></ul><ul><li>VI Findings </li></ul><ul><li>VII Discussion and conclusions </li></ul>Agenda
  3. 3. <ul><li>CSR has become of interest for national and international institutions (such as UN, EU or national governments like the German …) and NGOs in recent years </li></ul><ul><li>CSR interpreted as a step on the way towards sustainable business (Van Marrewijk 2003) and reframed since the ongoing economic instabilities </li></ul><ul><li>No coherent theory – more a ‘CSR movement’ (Curbach 2009) with references to a loosely coupled bundle of ideas; gathered in more narrow (tripple-bottom line) or wider (pyramid of responsibilities) approaches – CSR as ‘umbrella term’ (Matten&Moon ‘05) </li></ul><ul><li>R a upp et al. (2011) see a the CSR discourse at the wake of a ‘communicative turn’ </li></ul><ul><li>But a lot of applied research centers the question how to communicate (e.g. to gain credibility or to avoid accusations of green washing) </li></ul><ul><li>Instead: focus on type of organization in relation to the CSR approach(es) chosen </li></ul><ul><li>How to communicate CSR is related to the type, the environment, and the style of an organisation in relation to its chosen CSR activities and its CSR conceptualization </li></ul>I Introduction and problem
  4. 4. <ul><li>Two basic concepts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the conceptualization of CSR as a business case is seen as easiest way to spread CSR acting in a company </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On the other hand: CSR as a business case does not necessarily guarantee more moral behaviour or an ethical approach to business (value-based) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The institutional demand for more CSR initiative questions the characteristics of current CSR concepts such implicit and explicit CSR: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>While implicit CSR is viewed as closely related to a strong normative context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explicit CSR is perceived strategically and mostly voluntarily implemented as a result of deliberate decisions by the organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Institutions’ definition put an emphasis on the voluntary aspect of imposing CSR and thus qualifies it as a mainly strategic behaviour </li></ul></ul>II Institutionalization of CSR in (or by) CSR research and practice
  5. 5. II Institutionalization of CSR: Drivers of institutionalization (Angus-Leppan et al. 2010)
  6. 6. II Institutionalization of CSR: Drivers of institutionalization (extended scheme from Angus-Leppan et al. 2010)
  7. 7. II Institutionalization of CSR: Drivers of institutionalization (extended scheme from Angus-Leppan et al. 2010)
  8. 8. <ul><li>Although top managers are obviously in the best position to influence CSR ‘researchers failed to examine the effect of leader values, ethics and style in regards to CSR’ (Angus-Leppan et al. 2010, 193) </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Management styles in relation to CSR initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Autocratic Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Au thentic Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethical Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergent Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transformative Leadership </li></ul></ul>III Management styles and CSR initiative
  9. 9. <ul><li>Although top managers are obviously in the best position to influence CSR ‘researchers failed to examine the effect of leader values, ethics and style in regards to CSR’ (Angus-Leppan 2010, 193) </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Management styles in relation to CSR initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Autocratic Leadership (-> link to explicit CSR) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Au thentic Leadership (-> link to implicit CSR) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ethical Leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergent Leadership (-> link to implicit CSR) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transformative Leadership (-> could be necessary to help implement complex CSR concepts in organizations that are both: authentic and expressive) </li></ul></ul>III Management styles and CSR initiative
  10. 10. IV Role of management trainers in a management fashion cycle Source: Abrahamson 1996
  11. 11. IV Role of management trainers in a management fashion cycle Source: Abrahamson 1996
  12. 12. <ul><li>Sub-project in the context of a project on ‘organizational behaviour and design’, especially employer branding, organizational identity </li></ul><ul><li>Current project: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 st step: Online survey (22 questions; August/September 2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 nd step: 10-15 in-depth interviews to deepen the questionnaire’s findings (2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 rd step: survey among German and Swiss business schools (2012) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-c hosen sample of 130 German and Swiss executive coaches & management trainers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>60 persons filled out at least one question, 35 participants finished the questionnaire completely </li></ul><ul><li>24 German, 11 Swiss; 23 male, 11 female; 24 university degree; 5 PhD </li></ul><ul><li>19 percent work for major corporations, 25 for SME, 12 for family businesses </li></ul>V Project frame and methodology
  13. 13. <ul><li>Sub-project in the context of a project on ‘organizational behaviour and design’, especially employer branding, organizational identity </li></ul><ul><li>Current project: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 st step: Online survey (22 questions; August/September 2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 nd step: 10-15 in-depth interviews to deepen the questionnaire’s findings (2011) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 rd step: survey among German and Swiss business schools (2012) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-c hosen sample of 130 German and Swiss executive coaches & management trainers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>60 persons filled out at least one question, 35 participants finished the questionnaire completely </li></ul><ul><li>24 German, 11 Swiss; 23 male, 11 female; 24 university degree; 5 PhD </li></ul><ul><li>19 percent work for major corporations, 25 for SME, 12 for family businesses </li></ul>V Project frame and methodology
  14. 14. VI Findings
  15. 16. V Findings
  16. 19. <ul><li>We suggested a complex set of drivers for institutionalization of CSR – especially the connection between leadership style and CSR activities </li></ul><ul><li>Angus-Leppan et al. (2010) found that explicit and implicit CSR co-exist in the same organization; this relation is usually full of conflict that organizations – with the help of transformative leaders – can use for innovation </li></ul><ul><li>While CSR as a business case makes it easier to institutionalize, staff support is needed to secure internal credibility of CSR initiative; otherwise the psychological contract between employer and employee might be violated -> decreasing loyalty </li></ul><ul><li>Management trainers reflect the current status of CSR as being mainly a task on the managements’ agenda; they execute a quite conservative and implicit CSR approach; we interpret this as a indirect reference to transformational leadership </li></ul><ul><li>CSR still plays a minor role in executive trainings these days </li></ul><ul><li>Trainers believe only a minority of enterprises in GER and CH fully support CSR </li></ul>VII Discussion and conclusions
  17. 20. [email_address] www.mhmk.de CSR between leadership, communication strategy and management fashion. A (strictly) relational approach

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