Cereals System Initiative for South Asia             M.Srinivas Rao   Collaborative Discussions with MoA Senior Team      ...
Over the Next 90 minutes…First Half:• The Context - About CSISA• The Approach –Scale and Scope• About Delivery , and Roll ...
The Big Challenges• Food security• Rural and urban poverty & malnutrition• Natural resources: land and water• Farm sizes a...
“Cereals System Initiative for South Asia”   • Donors :     – Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation     – USAID     – World Ba...
“Cereals System Initiative for South Asia”: Key Objectives • Reverse the decline in annual cereal yield   growth • Reduce ...
Geographic Spread of CSISA     Pakistan, India ,Nepal and BangladeshPhase 1: 2009-2011Phase 2: 2012-2019BMGF:USAID:WB, RWC...
Focus AreasIntensive cereal-based systems in South Asia thatprovide the bulk of cereals for human consumptionand other use...
Scope• Integrated solutions for ecological intensification and  diversification at high levels of productivity: new produc...
The Key Themes of CSISAThe 8 Objectives:1. Delivery of new technologies through public-private   partnerships2. Future cer...
Theme 1: Delivery of production andPost Harvest technologies 1. Local synthesis of target zones and cereal    farming know...
CSISA – Hubs across South AsiaYear 1-3:8-12 hubs+$300/yr for 60,000farm households in1500 villages–India - 5Nepal- 1B’desh...
Customized Management Solutions• Seeds• Laser land leveling to save water and facilitate direct  sowing• Zero till crops a...
Objective 2: Management practices for    future cereal-based systems•     Participatory adaptation of new crop and resourc...
Objective 3: Rice breeding for future    cereal and crop-livestock systems•   Next generation of elite rice lines with inc...
Objective 4: Wheat breeding for future    cereal and crop-livestock systems•    Improved bread wheat varieties for the Eas...
Objective 5: Maize breeding for futurecereal and crop-livestock systems • Resistance to downy mildew (DM) and banded   lea...
Objective 6: Technology targeting andimproved policies•   Public-private partnerships for maximizing    development and ad...
Objective 7: New generation of scientistsand professional agronomists•   New generation of agricultural scientists for Sou...
Objective 8:Project Management Unit•   Project Management•   Donors Relations•   Communications•   Impact Analysis•   Gend...
Long-term:                                                                                      Improved varieties (3, 4, ...
Thank You !
INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS OF DELIVERY HUBS                                             Bihar   Nepal NW    CE BDHub #       ...
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13 Aug, 2010 Karnal CSISA Presentation

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Collaborative Discussions with MoA Senior Team
CSSRI Campus , Karnal

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13 Aug, 2010 Karnal CSISA Presentation

  1. 1. Cereals System Initiative for South Asia M.Srinivas Rao Collaborative Discussions with MoA Senior Team CSSRI Campus , Karnal Aug 13th, 2010
  2. 2. Over the Next 90 minutes…First Half:• The Context - About CSISA• The Approach –Scale and Scope• About Delivery , and Roll Out• About Building Partnerships• About Research Platforms• About Capacity BuildingSecond Half:• Q@A , Clarifications• Way Forward , Collaborations – NFSM (?)• Contact points
  3. 3. The Big Challenges• Food security• Rural and urban poverty & malnutrition• Natural resources: land and water• Farm sizes and labor• Energy• Climate extremes and climate change• Financial crisis
  4. 4. “Cereals System Initiative for South Asia” • Donors : – Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation – USAID – World Bank • Scientific R&D – IRRI , Philippines – CIMMYT , Mexico – IPFRI , USA – ILRI , Kenya
  5. 5. “Cereals System Initiative for South Asia”: Key Objectives • Reverse the decline in annual cereal yield growth • Reduce hunger and malnutrition • Increase Food and Income Security
  6. 6. Geographic Spread of CSISA Pakistan, India ,Nepal and BangladeshPhase 1: 2009-2011Phase 2: 2012-2019BMGF:USAID:WB, RWC:CGIAR:IRRI, CIMMYT, IFPRI, ILRINARESPrivate sectorNGOsARIUniversitiesSocieties (ASA)
  7. 7. Focus AreasIntensive cereal-based systems in South Asia thatprovide the bulk of cereals for human consumptionand other uses • Irrigated or partially irrigated systems, particularly R-R, R- W, R-R-R, R-R-legumes, and others • Emerging multiple/relay cropping systems involving R, W or M, particularly R-M, M-W, • Favorable rainfed R areas with potential for intensification/diversification
  8. 8. Scope• Integrated solutions for ecological intensification and diversification at high levels of productivity: new production systems• Strategic germplasm improvement for selected traits• Public-private sector partnerships for development and delivery• Policy analyses• Business Models
  9. 9. The Key Themes of CSISAThe 8 Objectives:1. Delivery of new technologies through public-private partnerships2. Future cereal-based systems3. Rice breeding for current and future systems4. Wheat breeding for current and future systems5. Maize breeding for current and future systems6. Technology targeting and improved policies7. Capacity building: scientists and professional agronomists8. Project management, communication and impact assessment
  10. 10. Theme 1: Delivery of production andPost Harvest technologies 1. Local synthesis of target zones and cereal farming knowledge for greater impact 2. Design and implement schemes for improved delivery of seeds and modern technologies in 9 hubs in South Asia 3. Design delivery systems and outscaling strategies for large scale roll-out of technologies through public and private sector channels
  11. 11. CSISA – Hubs across South AsiaYear 1-3:8-12 hubs+$300/yr for 60,000farm households in1500 villages–India - 5Nepal- 1B’desh - 2Pakistan -1Year 4-10:Upscaling throughproject-relatedinvestments to +400hubs+$350/yr for 6 millionfarm households in90,000 villages
  12. 12. Customized Management Solutions• Seeds• Laser land leveling to save water and facilitate direct sowing• Zero till crops after rice• Raised bed systems• Direct-seeded rice (wet or dry)• Alternate wetting and drying in rice cultivation• Site-specific nutrient management (R, W, M)• Integrated weed and pest management in cropping systems• Postharvest solutions (drying, storage, ….)• Information systems (hub communication platform)• Business Models and Market Linkages
  13. 13. Objective 2: Management practices for future cereal-based systems• Participatory adaptation of new crop and resource management technologies for CA systems• Experimental platforms: new generation of resource-efficient, high-yielding cereal systems• Operating in Objective 1 hubs and selected other areas• Interactions with breeding programs
  14. 14. Objective 3: Rice breeding for future cereal and crop-livestock systems• Next generation of elite rice lines with increased yield potential• New plant type for mechanized dry-seeding and water-saving irrigation• Rice tolerant to heat during flowering• Key biotic stresses that are threatening intensive cereal systems: sheath blight & planthoppers• Rice straw traits for fodder quality• Abiotic stress tolerant bioengineered rice
  15. 15. Objective 4: Wheat breeding for future cereal and crop-livestock systems• Improved bread wheat varieties for the Eastern and Western Indo-Gangetic Plains, Central India and West Pakistan• Germplasm and molecular markers for wheat resistance to spot blotch• Improved heat and drought tolerance in wheat• Wheat straw traits for fodder quality• Abiotic stress tolerant bioengineered wheat
  16. 16. Objective 5: Maize breeding for futurecereal and crop-livestock systems • Resistance to downy mildew (DM) and banded leaf and sheath blight (BLSB) • Heat tolerance during flowering and early-mid grain filling • Maize stover traits for fodder quality
  17. 17. Objective 6: Technology targeting andimproved policies• Public-private partnerships for maximizing development and adoption of improved seeds• Understand micro-level constraints to rapid productivity growth and adoption of resource conserving technologies• Assess policies and institutional issues at national level• Interactions with Objectives 1-5
  18. 18. Objective 7: New generation of scientistsand professional agronomists• New generation of agricultural scientists for South Asia: – Training courses for young scientists – Global Cereal Science Scholarships ( PhD) – Field internships for college students• Certified Crop Advisor (CCA) program for professional agronomists (with ASA)
  19. 19. Objective 8:Project Management Unit• Project Management• Donors Relations• Communications• Impact Analysis• Gender Strategy• Advocacy• Scale up
  20. 20. Long-term: Improved varieties (3, 4, 5): - yield potential (R, W) - biotech (drought, NUE, salinity) Improved cropping systems (2) Science capacity (7)Rice and wheat yield growth in Medium-term: Improved varieties (3, 4, 5): Targeting and Policies (6) - drought & heat tolerant >1.5%/yr - resistant to key biotic stresses - adapted to new systems South Asia Improved cropping systems (2) Science capacity (7) 1.2-1.5%/yr Short-term: Delivery (1) 1%/yr - Seeds - Agronomy - Postharvest <1%/yr Ext.capacity (7) 2010 2015 2020
  21. 21. Thank You !
  22. 22. INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS OF DELIVERY HUBS Bihar Nepal NW CE BDHub # Pak 1 Pb 2 Har 3 EUP 5 TN 14 6 8 BD 10 12Public Instt. 3 4 5 9 3 7 4 3 1SAUs - 2 3 - 1 2 1 1 1Input 1 2 5 2 2 2 2 -suppliersSeed 3 4 3 3 3 10 6 3 1companiesChem. Cos - 2 3 - 3 - 4 2 1NGOs 1 5 3 - 2 3 4 2 3Pvt. Ltd co. - 5 2 - - - 3 1 -Corporate MOUs being developed with BCS, ACI, Syngenta, Monsanto,ITC etcsectorSP and 2 7 5 - 8 31 3 - 2Coop.providers Total 11 33 29 14 22 55 28 12 9

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