Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Evaluation

Evaluation

  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Evaluation

  1. 1. Evaluation of Composition, Framing and Movement Evaluation Notes: Shot One -Handheld shot, pans to follow the character mimicking his movement well. - Well framed mid shot, featuring the balloon. - Silhouette of character gives a defined outline. -Line in edge of steps, slight diagonal. Shot Two -Good low angle, long shot to convey his unknown ‘power’ (referencing how he scared Ollie). - Line imagery of steps (horizontal). - Good lead room, however towards the end; the panning of the shot could have sped up to keep him in the same part of frame. - Head room is good, as his head is not get cut off, nor does it have too much of a gap. Shot three - Mid shot of Ollie. The foreground depicts vertical line of the metal fence and he is positioned using the ‘rule of thirds’ on the left hand side. This shows the background building and the vertical and horizontal line work on it. - Shot should have been more stable (however this was part of a shot when I was setting up the camera and I was unaware it was filming) I accidently switched the camera off, when I wanted to film my action; therefore no accurate footage was recorded. Shot four - Close-up shot of the mobile phone shows a continuous line around the edge of the phone. -Shot is framed well. - Shot should have been longer and more stabilised however, the same technical problem, as per shot three, occurred. Shot Five -Long two shot - Shows line -Rule of thirds -Good head room - Smooth movement Shot Six - Close-up shot of balloon before being popped -line value in the background Shot seven -180 degree rule, done well with good head room - lines in background -lower angle Shot eight Same as shot seven
  2. 2. Holding a Shot Steady: Shots one, two, five, six, seven and eight are reasonably well controlled. However, shots three and four should have been more stable. Unfortunately there was a technical error, as I filmed the practice action while setting up the camera and not the actual intended action. This error was basically down to me rushing and not fully concentrating on the task at hand, due to the time limitations. With the exception of shots three and four, the other handheld footage successfully communicates the key intended emotion. Shot two effectively captures the motion of my moving subject, but towards the end of the shot, the panning movement of the camera was not in sync and this did not keep my subject‘s body rhythms central to the frame. Anticipatory framing was in general adequate to visually communicate the short narrative appropriately. Framing a Shot Appropriately: Framing in all the shots is adequate. Success can be associated with the head and nose rooms. However some attention is needed to fully achieve an excellent lead room, which was evident in shot two. The panning movement towards the end of this shot needed a little more speed to keep the lead room appropriately established. The composition elements are quite imaginative. However, on the other hand I should have considered more inventive aspects. I tried to pay attention to the artistic value of line, by including continuous, vertical, horizontal and diagonals, to express meaning. For example, the horizontal position of line relating to the steps Jack is walking down, accentuates the width, but depicts a calming atmosphere. However, in contrast to this, the small vertical lines detailed to the step brickwork, operate as portraying energy. This will help to communicate a calming, but energetic tone to the narrative. Furthermore, it also foreshadows the event to come.
  3. 3. Positive and negative space plays an essential role in successfully communicating the required composition. I tried to implement these aspects effectively, within each frame and I tried to visually make use of the foreground, background and mid ground in the majority of the shots, to avoid confusion and lack of substance. Colour, tone, texture and pattern are also present in the sequence. A Varity of Shot:

×