it all adds             +       up toMFL
Framework for School Inspection              Ofsted, Dec 2012
Maths &           MFLLiteracy  EYFS     KS2  KS1      KS3  KS2      KS4
money     coin      note      penny     pencepound     price     cost       buy     bought sell      sold     spend     sp...
days of the                 how long       quarter               century                                    GMT  week     ...
http://tinyurl.com/maths-vocab
Number recognition,   sequencing and place value
Number cards
Games & activities
Dice
Sticky numbers
Dominoes
Maths equipment
Tennis
Random    Number   Generator(1 or 2 numbers)
100 squares
siete    cuatro doce      sietecuatro     doceveinte    catorcecatorce   veinte
Random     Number    Generator(3, 4, 5 numbers)
neuf  dix-huit vingt-sept  trente-six____________
< ou > ?quarante > quatorze quinze < dix-neuf
Ladder Game
huitquatre un sept trois dix         1 - 10
cinquante-cinq  vingt-trois soixante-septquarante-et-un  trente-huitsoixante-quatre                  20-69
Addition & SubtractionMultiplication & Division
Adding squares
Odd one out
€29,99          €1         € 19, 90€1, 40                    €1                                €1,50          www.bonbonsg...
Distributeur Pez “MonsieurCostaud”                       J’en voudrais                        cinq. C’est                 ...
Coquillages Roudoudou                    J’en voudrais                     neuf. C’est                      combien?      ...
Carambar caramel, l’original                       J’en voudrais                         un. C’est                        ...
Fractions
Katy a pris un                  quart de la pizza.                  Simone a pris trois                  huitièmes de la  ...
Post-it grids
1/2    la moitié1/3    le tiers1/4    le quart1/5    le cinquième1/6    le sixième1/7    le septième1/8    le huitième1/9 ...
Percentages
Encuesta: Nuestros animales preferidos  gato       6 / 30      20%  perro      9 / 30         30%  conejo     3 / 30      ...
Les résultats de nos examens Théo:                Sarah: Français 37/50       Français 43/60 Maths     28/65      Maths   ...
www.king-jouet.com
Shapes
En mi cuadro hay un triángulo rojo,un triángulo azul, un círculo verde,un círculo rosa, un cuadrado amarillo,cuatro rectán...
Measures
Avec $1 je peux acheter…..une grande glace                  au Costa Ricaun litre de lait                  en Colombietroi...
Sunderland   Madrid   Santiago de                         Chile
Time
Tarsia puzzles
mardi       premier   marsmercredi         8      avrilvendredi le     12       juin samedi         24     octobredimanche...
Data handling
Reading from tables
Reading from tables
It all-adds-up-to-mfl
It all-adds-up-to-mfl
It all-adds-up-to-mfl
It all-adds-up-to-mfl
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  • It&apos;s undeniable that learning another language contributes to and improves students&apos; literacy skills. But are you aware of how much maths you include in your MFL lessons on a day to day basis? This is the main reason why we need to be aware of numeracy and what we do: Ofsted framework - “Achievement of pupils at the school” So whether we like it or not, the school will be judged on how maths is applied across the curriculum. It’s in our best interest to make sure we are aware of what mathematical content lies within our schemes of work, and that when we refer to “technical” maths vocabulary we are using it correctly. It’s not necessarily going to require us to extra work, but to be more aware of what we already do and to make the most of opportunities to promote numeracy and mathematical skills within our lessons.
  • Then we get articles like this from the Guardian in May 2011 about CBI criticising the poor literacy and numeracy skills of school leavers. It’s something that universities have commented on as well. It’s clear that we all need to share the responsibility of preparing students for the big wide world.
  • KS2 MFL reinforces the maths done in EYFS and KS1 – number recognition, number bonds, simple arithmetic, 2D and 3D shapes, money and so on. It also has potential to use aspects of KS2 numeracy such as data handling, percentages and fractions. These are further revisited in KS3 and 4. These are the basics which it can do no harm to reinforce. There was a thread on the TES recently said that the inclusion of maths in MFL is “a crackpot scheme thought up by a jackass”, and as worthwhile as maths teachers having to include literacy in their lessons. However closer investigation and comparisons of programmes of study reveals that whether we like it or not, maths is embedded in our schemes of work (as are most other subjects, we must admit). In my school the maths co-ordinator often suggests to me things that he would like me to reinforce if possible, particularly with Y5 and Y6. This gives me more ideas for classroom activities, enables the children to reinforce their maths and also gives MFL more relevance by building those bridges across subjects. As I see it, it’s a win-win. Here are just some of the ways in which you teach maths:
  • Solving problems – Money – Y6 vocabulary – in other words what they have to know by the end of KS2. How much of this can MFL help with?
  • Measures, shape and space – Time – Y6 vocabulary Before I started researching this, I knew that MFL teachers did a fair bit towards Maths, but I wasn’t aware exactly how much we did. It’s only looking at the key vocabulary for KS2 Maths that makes this clear: this is the “Time” vocabulary. See how many of your topic areas it touches on. Do your maths department know that you do all this?
  • Can download vocabulary booklet from here. Lets you know what they will have covered when and also enables you to detail the numeracy covered in schemes of work and lesson plans. Also lets you know what language you need to use, such as the word “calculations” not “sums”
  • There are 10 main areas to the KS2 Maths curriculum, so let’s look at some activities from each. Not saying you have to do these activities, but hopefully will be “sowing the seed” and triggering some ideas. starting with number sequencing. Children need to be able to count forwards and backwards in units, tens and hundreds from any 2 or 3 digit number. Forwards not too challenging, backwards bit more tricky!
  • Toys and things I use for practising numbers: Flashcards – for introducing, playing which card etc, telephone numbers, washing lines, can give sets of small cards to children to hold up, to help each other to practise and so on
  • These are telephone number cards, where the student “dials” the number at the bottom of the card having “received” the one at the top. The idea is to make a chain where all chn participate and have to listen very carefully. Fun to do it against the clock. Can also use it to “phone” individual chn. Also cards with digits and words on, to make 2 or even 3 figure numbers and use the words to write them. Challenge is to use all the cards.
  • Can be used for simple number recognition, addition. These are silent dice – recommended!
  • Good for small groups, such as nursery, Reception, KS1, SEN etc. The foam numbers have velcro hook pads on the back to stick onto the fluffy board. From craftpacks.co.uk
  • Promotes co-operative working and can be adapted to lots of different areas of language. Can be made using Tarsia or there are other online makers out there. Could even do a template in powerpoint. These particular ones were to introduce chn to numbers 16-31. They were using what they already knew to find out and match up the new numbers.
  • Classrooms (and maths departments!) have number lines and number fans. Get children using them in the language. With the number fans can show a colour for each number for example, they show the right number. Constantly reinforcing numbers.
  • For practising sequences and for active involvement Numbers in sequence, then one up, one down etc
  • Use for single numbers, adding etc Press F9 to change the number
  • 100 squares are very commonly used in the primary maths classroom and so something that children will be familiar with. Give them a 100 square each and a counter, and all count together. Physical act of sliding the counter along helps it to go in better If the square is laminated, give them a whiteboard marker. They take it in turns to circle 5 numbers and say them to their partner, who has to circle the same numbers on their square. They can then compare squares to check the answers.
  • Put written numbers in the right order
  • Can be used for big numbers and place value but also for putting them in the right order
  • Accessing higher order skills when doing something as apparently mundane as numbers Other things: complete a number sequence, where the numbers are given in written form or spoken again to increase the challenge Of course you can make these as simple as you like or as complex. Easy to knock up and make appropriate for the class you have. It makes them think!!
  • Use the symbols &lt;, &gt; and = &lt; is “est inférieur à…” and &gt; is “est supérieur à”
  • For sequencing Give each student or pair of students one of the ladders. Call out seven numbers. They have to write them down and then arrange them in ascending order on the ladder.
  • Give some numbers in random order. Chn work in pairs or groups to put them in order. They have to sing a song when they have done it, but only win if they can read the numbers out in the correct order. Sing Sur le pont d’Avignon Answer: Un Trois Quatre Sept Huit dix
  • Let’s make it a bit more taxing This activity could also work with verb forms, months, words in a sentence, times and so on Answer: Vingt-trois Trente-huit Quarante-et-un Cinquante-cinq Soixante-quatre Soixante-sept
  • Can use a lot of the same ideas for both. Listed as two separate parts of the maths curriculum though
  • This would also work for verb forms – person on one axis, infinitive on the other
  • Good for maths skills and also for higher order thinking. Think about how many different areas of language you could use this for. Idea is that chn say which is the odd one out and, most importantly, why it is the odd one out.
  • Set them off on a TL shopping website with a (pretend) budget of Euros. They have to present the prices of what they buy in Euros in words as well as work out the change in words too. C’est combien un Roll’up cola, et deux lots de Mini poppis? €3,80 Good intercultural link too – different currency, terminology for online shopping, comma where we put a decimal point etc.
  • Children at KS2 have to understand unit fractions (1/3, 1/8 etc) as well as several parts of one whole such as 2/3 and 5/8. In the language it involves different vocabulary such as tiers, quart, cinquième etc which overlap with time and with ordinal numbers
  • Students will have to work out which is bigger, ¼ or 3/8 and then complete the sentence. Way of introducing the comparative.
  • Calculating fractions but also showing this particular resources idea which is very adaptable.
  • To help out
  • Follows on from fractions The word “per cent” itself leads to some cognate and linguistic work – cent meaning 100 and links with other languages. Percentages can be used for comparisons and therefore for work using the comparative and superlative and the negative.
  • For example the results of a class survey. Calculate the percentages. This makes it easier to compare the results with other similar surveys and facilitates making graphs or piecharts. Find the percentages and the total and percentage for mouse. Can then makes sentences to talk about the results using the comparative and superlative.
  • Find the percentages. Will involve more complex mental maths or perhaps use of calculators (crack out the smartphones!) To be able to comment on their aptitude for one subject compared to another, students will have to find the percentages (lowest common denominator again) Can then compare their own ability across subjects as well as make comparisons between pupils Theo: 74%, 43%, 57% Sarah: 72%, 54%, 40%
  • Shopping is another topic where percentages pop up. Again, give them a budget, some items, their prices and discounts, and they have to work out what they are going to buy. Tense work can also come into play here.
  • By the end of Y6 children will have covered (under the new draft maths curriculum) 2D and 3D shapes, along with the notion of symmetry, angles, perimeter and area. 2D shapes can help you with pictures, patterns and therefore colours and plurals. 3D shapes (such as children’s bricks) are useful for preposition work.
  • This is an image made by one of my Y2s using autoshapes in ppt. Only allowed to use circles, squares and triangles. Count the different shapes and say the plurals. Hay seis círculos. Hay seis cuadrados. Hay tres triángulos.
  • Then can use the actions and vocabulary to describe what is on the picture. Lots of scope for individual creativity
  • By measures we mean knowing metric units, how they compare in size, the difference between metric and imperial, how to interpret and read scales as well as record measurements using decimal notation. “Shopping lists” is an obvious choice for this one, as well as recipes. http://www.lonelyplanet.com/asia/travel-tips-and-articles/76028 What you can buy for a dollar
  • Something a little different perhaps, with an intercultural flavour ($1 = 63p) Students have to express opinions about which country they think each one is (when they’ve worked out what’s on the list and how much a dollar is worth) Scope here for using webquest to compare prices across the world/Europe etc and compare currencies.
  • Reading scales – temperatures, reading from a thermometer. Here are the temperatures from Saturday 2 nd Feb. Cultural element here too, i.e. use of Centigrade, where are the places mentioned, can the children add to the list and make thermometers for their friends to read Combien de degrès à ….? Again some comparative work. Stimulus for work about climate, describing general weather – good for coursework holiday abroad!
  • Time is so much more than just clocks. Saw the key vocabulary earlier. There’s also calendars, timetables…
  • Here’s a Cluedo game that I played with my Y4/5 classes last week. Idea is to listen carefully to everyone else and thinking logically while still saying lots of dates. Can be played teacher vs class but also of course in pairs. Can be adapted to lots of topic areas, e.g. hobbies and frequency, jobs in the house, school subjects…
  • What is data handling? Tables, pictograms, bar charts, pie charts, use of mean median and mode, surveys. Questionnaires, databases, Venn diagrams, Carroll diagrams
  • Maths and intercultural understanding all in one go
  • Maths and intercultural understanding all in one go
  • It all-adds-up-to-mfl

    1. 1. it all adds + up toMFL
    2. 2. Framework for School Inspection Ofsted, Dec 2012
    3. 3. Maths & MFLLiteracy EYFS KS2 KS1 KS3 KS2 KS4
    4. 4. money coin note penny pencepound price cost buy bought sell sold spend spent pay costs more mostchange dear expensive expensive more costs less leastcheap cheaper expensive expensive less how how total amount valuemuch? many?worth discount profit loss currency
    5. 5. days of the how long quarter century GMT week ago? pastmonths of how long will millennium clock BSTthe year it be until…? International seasons weekend arrive watch Date Line day birthday depart hands how often? week holiday hour digital always fortnight calendar minute analogue never old/older/ month second timer often oldest new/newer/ 24 hour year o’clock sometimes newest clock 12 hourleap year timetable half past usually clock
    6. 6. http://tinyurl.com/maths-vocab
    7. 7. Number recognition, sequencing and place value
    8. 8. Number cards
    9. 9. Games & activities
    10. 10. Dice
    11. 11. Sticky numbers
    12. 12. Dominoes
    13. 13. Maths equipment
    14. 14. Tennis
    15. 15. Random Number Generator(1 or 2 numbers)
    16. 16. 100 squares
    17. 17. siete cuatro doce sietecuatro doceveinte catorcecatorce veinte
    18. 18. Random Number Generator(3, 4, 5 numbers)
    19. 19. neuf dix-huit vingt-sept trente-six____________
    20. 20. < ou > ?quarante > quatorze quinze < dix-neuf
    21. 21. Ladder Game
    22. 22. huitquatre un sept trois dix 1 - 10
    23. 23. cinquante-cinq vingt-trois soixante-septquarante-et-un trente-huitsoixante-quatre 20-69
    24. 24. Addition & SubtractionMultiplication & Division
    25. 25. Adding squares
    26. 26. Odd one out
    27. 27. €29,99 €1 € 19, 90€1, 40 €1 €1,50 www.bonbonsgourmands.fr
    28. 28. Distributeur Pez “MonsieurCostaud” J’en voudrais cinq. C’est combien? dix-sept Euros cinquante, s’il vous plaît.
    29. 29. Coquillages Roudoudou J’en voudrais neuf. C’est combien? Vingt-deux Euros cinquante, s’il vous plaît.
    30. 30. Carambar caramel, l’original J’en voudrais un. C’est combien? quatorze centimes, s’il vous plaît.
    31. 31. Fractions
    32. 32. Katy a pris un quart de la pizza. Simone a pris trois huitièmes de la pizza.Complète la phrase: Simone Katy_________ a pris plus que __________.
    33. 33. Post-it grids
    34. 34. 1/2 la moitié1/3 le tiers1/4 le quart1/5 le cinquième1/6 le sixième1/7 le septième1/8 le huitième1/9 le neuvième1/10 le dixième1/12 le douzième
    35. 35. Percentages
    36. 36. Encuesta: Nuestros animales preferidos gato 6 / 30 20% perro 9 / 30 30% conejo 3 / 30 10% hámster 3 / 30 10% ratón 9 / 30 30%El perro es más popular que el gato.
    37. 37. Les résultats de nos examens Théo: Sarah: Français 37/50 Français 43/60 Maths 28/65 Maths 38/70 Anglais 34/60 Anglais 22/55Théo est plus fort en anglais que Sarah. Théo est plus fort en français qu’en maths.
    38. 38. www.king-jouet.com
    39. 39. Shapes
    40. 40. En mi cuadro hay un triángulo rojo,un triángulo azul, un círculo verde,un círculo rosa, un cuadrado amarillo,cuatro rectángulos rosas, un rectánguloverde y un rectángulo marrón.
    41. 41. Measures
    42. 42. Avec $1 je peux acheter…..une grande glace au Costa Ricaun litre de lait en Colombietrois paires de tongs en Croatieune tasse de café et au Danemarkdeux biscuits au Vietnamun ananas , www.lonelyplanet.com/asia/travel-tips-and-articles/76028
    43. 43. Sunderland Madrid Santiago de Chile
    44. 44. Time
    45. 45. Tarsia puzzles
    46. 46. mardi premier marsmercredi 8 avrilvendredi le 12 juin samedi 24 octobredimanche 31 décembre
    47. 47. Data handling
    48. 48. Reading from tables
    49. 49. Reading from tables

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