Waste Assessment

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Waste Assessment

  1. 1. Waste Assessment Lowes Grove Middle School March 3, 2009
  2. 2. What is a waste assessment? • A tool to help identify and quantify the amount of waste generated
  3. 3. Why do a waste assessment? • Identify areas of where we can reduce waste • What are some benefits to waste reduction? – Protect environment – Save energy – Reduce greenhouse gas emissions – Decrease cost
  4. 4. North Carolina Recycling Facts • The trash we throw into the landfill each year is equivalent to the weight of 6.8 billion cars. • Last week, NC threw away enough newspapers to fill nearly 3 football fields 3 feet deep. • There is a state ban on throwing away aluminum cans. Despite this, only half are recycled. • From January to July, North Carolinians throw away enough trash to build a 3 x 3 foot wall around the earth.
  5. 5. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed
  6. 6. Types of Waste Assessments 1. Records Examination • Examining school’s waste generation and removal patterns • Purchasing invoices, sales logs, waste hauling and recycling records 2. Facility Walk-Through • Tour school and grounds, observing activities in each department, interviewing employees about waste producing activities and equipment 3. Waste Sort • Identify each component of school’s waste and calculating its percentage of school’s total waste generation
  7. 7. Records Examination Strengths Limitations • Provides weights or volumes • Might not provide quantitative of wastes generated data about specific waste • Tracks major potential waste components from the point of origin • Does not provide qualitative • Identifies the most expensive data on how or why wastes are or valuable components of generated waste • Might require substantial effort • Documents financial benefits to collect and analyze data of reuse and recycling including total revenues and avoided disposal costs • Requires less time and effort than other approaches
  8. 8. Facility Walk-Through Strengths Limitations • Requires less time and • Might not identify all effort than waste sorts wastes generated • Allows first-hand • Might not be examination of facility representative if only operations conducted once • Provides qualitative • Relies on estimates of information about major waste generation waste components and waste-generating processes • Reveals waste reduction opportunities
  9. 9. Waste Sort Strengths Limitations • Provides qualitative data • Requires more time and on total waste generation effort than other and specific waste approaches components • Might not be representative if only conducted once • Does not provide qualitative data on how or why wastes are generated
  10. 10. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed. 2. Map your Assessment
  11. 11. Mapping the Assessment • Where will you perform the assessment? • Will you evaluate the waste generation in every classroom or a few? • Will you include the kitchen and cafeteria in your assessment?
  12. 12. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed. 2. Map your Assessment 3. Set a date and announce the assessment
  13. 13. Announce the Assessment • Let faculty and administration know of the assessment • Ask faculty to put aside a full day’s trash so you can assess that trash
  14. 14. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed. 2. Map your Assessment 3. Set a date and announce the assessment 4. Gather necessary supplies
  15. 15. Gathering Supplies Facility Walk-Through Waste Sort • Clip board and • Clip board and assessment forms assessment forms • Gloves • Gloves • Litter pick-up stick • Scales (used to move waste • Plastic traps in containers) • Plastic bags • Buckets
  16. 16. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed. 2. Map your Assessment 3. Set a date and announce the assessment 4. Gather necessary supplies 5. Perform the assessment and record gathered data
  17. 17. Performing the Assessment 1. Records Examination • Collect relevant records such as purchasing invoices, sales logs, and waste hauling and recycling records • Compare purchasing information with waste and recycling removal information 2. Facility Walk-Through • Walk through the selected areas of the school, begin looking in waste receptacles • Estimate the volume and/or weight of materials collected. Record estimated values on assessment form 3. Waste Sort • Place tarps in area chosen for waste sort. Empty contents of the dry trash on one tarp, wet on another • Sort contents according to materials list on assessment form • Weigh dry and wet trash
  18. 18. Steps to Conducting a Waste Assessment 1. Decide on the type of assessment that will be performed. 2. Map your Assessment 3. Set a date and announce the assessment 4. Gather necessary supplies 5. Perform the assessment and record gathered data 6. Tally and share results
  19. 19. Sharing Results • Tally the results. The data will provide you with an overview of: – How much waste your school generates – The composition of the waste – Where specific materials accumulate in high volume • Share the results with faculty, staff, administration and students – Wow Presentation
  20. 20. What are your next steps? • Decide on what waste assessment to do • Plan how you are going to approach the assessment – Who, what, where, when • What results do you expect from the assessment? • What materials will we need to conduct the assessment? • Assign roles for students: Who will do what?

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