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Tac Presentation October 72014- Raspberry PI

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Topic: Low cost computing using the Raspberry PI and other single board computing platforms. Overview of the growing low cost computing environment and demo of basic configuration of the Raspberry PI and Arduino for home and business projects.

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Tac Presentation October 72014- Raspberry PI

  1. 1. Low cost computing using the Raspberry PI and other single board computing platforms.
  2. 2. The Technology and Automation Committee (TAC) performs numerous functions in the chapter. TAC hosts some of the following activities: o Host regular technical and professional workshops for BDPA members. o Hands on training with emerging technologies. o Technical networking between members to help solve your personal and professional projects. o Applying technical knowledge in the community by donating IT services to schools and non-profit organizations to facilitate technical concerns such as: o Design and construction of LAN networks. o Troubleshooting and construction of computer labs. o Network administration. o Designing software and troubleshooting software systems. o Hosting community technical expos. o Technical speakers for schools and events.
  3. 3. 1. Types of computing platforms 2. Overview of Raspberry PI and Arduino 3. Setting up Raspberry PI 4. Setting up the Arduino 5. What can you do with these devices
  4. 4.  Raspberry PI  Banana PI  Beagle Bone Black  Intel  Arduino http://edn.com/design/diy/4419990/11/The-biggest- little-revolution--10-single-board-computers- for-under--100  Most are Open Source hardware using ARM processors (RISC based)
  5. 5. The Raspberry Pi Model B is based on the Broadcom BCM2835 SoC, equipped with an ARM11767JZF-S 700 MHz processor. As an upgrade to the original design, the Model B has 512 MB RAM with two USB ports and an Ethernet port. The VideoCore IV GPU enables high-definition video playback; I2C interface allows for device expansion; and an SD card slot is provided for booting and long-term memory storage. Raspberry Pi supports. Debian Linux and its derivative Raspbian OS being the most popular. The rest of the supported OS platforms being Android (2.3 & 4.0), Haiku, Firefox OS, Gentoo Linux, Google Chromium OS, Open web OS, Arch Linux ARM, Fedora, Plan 9, Slackware Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, and the RISC OS. The RISC OS only supported by later versions of the Raspberry Pi (v 5.17 and beyond).
  6. 6. Banana Pi is a single-board computer. Banana Pi targets to be a cheap, small and flexible enough computer for daily life. Built with ARM Cortex-A7 Dual-core CPU and Mali400MP2 GPU, and open source software http://www.bananapi.org/p/product.html
  7. 7. The BeagleBone Black, a Texas Instruments-powered SBC, is a member of the BeagleBoard family of development boards. By featuring TI's low-cost Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex- A8 microprocessor, the BeagleBone Black intends to offer developers a cost-effective solution for builds requiring a plethora of expansion options such as add-on boards. The BBB supports most Linux distributions and comes with the Angstrom distribution pre-installed. The BeagleBone Black, a Texas Instruments-powered SBC, is a member of the BeagleBoard family of development boards. By featuring TI's low-cost Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex-A8 microprocessor, the BeagleBone Black intends to offer developers a cost-effective solution for builds requiring a plethora of expansion options such as add-on boards. As most development boards of its kind, the BBB supports most Linux distributions and comes with the Angstrom distribution pre-installed
  8. 8. Uses a 22nm Intel® SoC that includes a dual core, dual threaded Intel® Atom™ CPU at 500MHz and a 32-bit Intel® Quark™ microcontroller at 100 MHz. It supports 40 GPIOs and includes 1GB LPDDR3, 4 GB EMMC, and dual-band WiFi and BTLE on a module slighter larger than a postage stamp. The Intel Edison module will initially support development with Arduino* and C/C++, followed by Node.JS, Python, RTOS, and Visual Programming support in the near future. The Intel Edison module includes a device-to-device and device-to-cloud connectivity framework to enable cross-device communication and a cloud-based, multi-tenant, time-series analytics service.
  9. 9. http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Products The Arduino Uno is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 (datasheet). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz ceramic resonator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Uno differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it features the Atmega16U2 (Atmega8U2 up to version R2) programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.
  10. 10.  Cheap!!! Only $35 at Microcenter  Same power consumption as a cell phone (about $0.62 per month)  Can be run with or without a keyboard, mouse and monitor (headless)  Low space footprint  No moving parts to break  Can be sticky-taped to your router
  11. 11. ● 700MHz ARM Processor ● Broadcom VideoCore IV ● 512MB RAM ● 2x USB Ports ● HDMI, RCA ports ● Integrated Audio (3.5mm jack) ● 10/100 Fast Ethernet port ● Micro USB Power port ● SD/MMC Card Support
  12. 12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw2nTpLFof8
  13. 13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F054MNB1QI
  14. 14. Download OS from www.RaspberryPi.org/downloads/
  15. 15. If you download an image file
  16. 16. Download from http://www.raspberrypi.org/help/noobs-setup/  Using a computer with an SD card reader, visit the Downloads page.  Click on the Download ZIP button under ‘NOOBS (offline and network install)’, and select a folder to save it to.  Extract the files from the zip. Format your SD card  It is best to format your SD card before copying the NOOBS files onto it. To do this:  Visit the SD Association’s website and download SD Formatter 4.0 for either Windows or Mac.  Follow the instructions to install the software.  Insert your SD card into the computer or laptop’s SD card reader and make a note of the drive letter allocated to it, e.g. G:/  In SD Formatter, select the drive letter for your SD card and format it.
  17. 17. Drag and drop NOOBS files  Once your SD card has been formatted, drag all the files in the extracted NOOBS folder and drop them onto the SD card drive.  The necessary files will then be transferred to your SD card.  When this process has finished, safely remove the SD card and insert it into your Raspberry Pi. First boot  Plug in your keyboard, mouse and monitor cables.  Now plug in the USB power cable to your Pi.  Your Raspberry Pi will boot, and a window will appear with a list of different operating systems that you can install. We recommend that you use Raspbian – tick the box next to Raspbian and click on Install.  Raspbian will then run through its installation process. Note this can take a while.  When the install process has completed, the Raspberry Pi configuration menu (raspi-config) will load. Here you are able to set the time and date for your region and enable a Raspberry Pi camera board, or even create users. You can exit this menu by using Tab on your keyboard to move to Finish.
  18. 18.  You’ll need to download the Arduino Software package for your operating system from the Arduino download page.  When you’ve downloaded and opened the application you should see something like this:
  19. 19.  We need to setup the environment to Tools menu and select Board.  Then select the type of Arduino you want to program, in our case it’s the Arduino Uno. http://forefront.io/a/beginners-guide-to-arduino
  20. 20.  Arduino GPS-synchronized clock  Raspberry Pi Stratum 1 NTP server  Raspberry Pi wall-mounted calendar  Asterisk VoIP for Raspberry Pi http://www.raspberry-asterisk.org/faq/  Raspberry Pi Network Monitoring Node  Raspberry Pi surveillance camera  Really cheap laser engraver  TOR Router http://www.networkworld.com/article/2452760/smartphones/158674-Hero-hacks- 14-Raspberry-Pi-projects-primed-for- IT.html?source=NWWNLE_nlt_daily_am_2014-07-10#tk.rss_wireless
  21. 21.  Raspberry Pi server  Joomla or WordPress web server  Minecraft webserver  VPN  Penetration Testing https://www.pwnieexpress.com/raspberry-pwn- pentesting-release-raspberry-pi/  Wearable computing  Robotics  http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=13 19094&image_number=1
  22. 22.  http://beagleboard.org/Products/BeagleBone+Bl ack  http://makerzone.mathworks.com/raspberry-pi/  http://www.raspberrypi.org/  http://www.arduino.cc/  http://www.instructables.com/  http://www.makeuseof.com/  https://www.youtube.com/user/RaspberryPiBegi nners
  23. 23.  Raspberry Pi Wiki  Adafruit's Raspberry Pi Projects Page  Element 14's Raspberry Pi Resource Page  The Raspberry Pi Education Manual (PDF)  The Pi Store (Here's how to get it built-in to Raspbian)  The University of Cambridge Raspberry Pi Tutorials  Unofficial Raspberry Pi Forums  http://www.element14.com/community/welcome  https://www.youtube.com/user/arduinoteam  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK9u-dWeK3PLsReP13EP- Sg BeagleBoard Channel

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