Bb world2010

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Bb world2010

  1. 1. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 
 Advantages
and
Disadvantages
of
Group
Work
 
 My
thoughts
 Advantages
 Disadvantages
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 What
others
say
 Advantages
 Disadvantages
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  2. 2. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 Informal
Group
Activities
 
 Think­Pair­Share

 Description:

 Think Pair Share helps students clarify, reinforce, and/or apply the content of the lesson. Useful
for:
 • Learning check - Break up a lecture after about 15-20 minutes (or after a major concept)
 Instructions:

 1. Ask a question of the class requiring critical thinking, application, synthesis or evaluation. 2. Think! (Individual activity) - Encourage students to think about the question and their answer for 2-3 minutes. Ask students to make notes of the question and their thoughts. 3. Pair! - Ask students to work with one classmate (can be students next to each other or in front or behind each other) to discuss the question and answers. You move among students to assess student responses and learning. Give students plenty of time to discuss the question in detail. 4. Share! - Ask volunteers to share their discussion with the class. Involve the entire class in a summarizing discussion. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Roundrobins
 Description:

 The purpose of Roundrobin is to engage every student in the discussion by following a systematic structure for sharing.
 Useful
for:
 • systematic group discussions of key ideas from class • developing listening skills and patience
 Instructions:

 1. Break students into group of 4-5. Assign one student to be the “recorder”. 2. Provide a question that asks student to think critically and to reflect. 3. Each student systematically take a turn around the circle while the recorder writes down key words or phrases from each student as he/she shares points of view. 4. Students may offer new ideas or follow up on a previous stated idea. Or, students may “pass” if they have nothing new to add at the time of their turn. Students may “pass” during one round and then offer an idea on the next. Passing does not eliminate students from the discussion. Passing simply indicates that a student has nothing new to add during this turn. 5. Continue the turn taking until the group exhausts all ideas and all students “pass” on their turn. 6. Conduct an open discussion after the Roundrobin. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  3. 3. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 Buzz
Groups
 Description:

 Buzz Groups engage students with each other and the content of the course. Buzz Groups provide a less structured discussion. Useful
for:
 • processing key ideas
 Instructions:

 1. Break students into groups of 4-5. 2. Ask students to discuss a text, an issue, clinical or technical concepts. The assignment can be broad or specific. 3. Students discuss freely. They can argue, defend, explain, etc. their point of view. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Bookends
 Useful
for:
 • Assessing learning during a lesson
 Instructions:

 1. Individual activity - At the beginning a class lesson or unit of instruction, ask students to take 4-5 minutes to write down all the questions they have about the lesson. Give them enough time to think, write, and reflect. 2. Paired activity - ask students to share their questions, concerns, and issues with a partner. You walk among students to assess the kinds of questions students are sharing. 3. Ask student volunteers to share their questions, concerns, and issues with the class. 4. The instructor should record the questions on the board or flip chart so everyone can see. DO NOT ANSWER the questions at this point. 5. Conduct the lesson. 6. At the end of the instruction, ask students to review the questions with their partner or in larger groups of 4-5. Encourage them to find the answers in the lesson just conducted. 7. Bring back to the entire class and discuss any questions remaining unanswered or needing clarification. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  4. 4. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 Three
Before
Me
 Useful
for:
 • peer review of written assignments 
 • improving editing/proof-reading skills, knowledge of content, and ability to provide feedback to others
 • encouraging positive interdependence among team members
 Instructions:

 1. Break students into groups of 4. Ask students to “trade” written assignments with a team member. 2. One - Each group member does a peer assessment of the written assignment and returns the assignment to the original author. 3. Using the feedback provided by group members, students edit/rewrite their assignments to incorporate the peer assessment. 4. Two - After the first set of edits/rewrites, students trade papers with a second member of their group. Again, this group member assesses the assignment and provides feedback to the original author. The author edits and rewrites. 5. Three - group members trade written assignments with the remaining member of their four- member group. This group member does a final check of the assignment for the original author. Edits/rewrites are completed as needed. 6. Students submit their written work for instructor assessment. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  5. 5. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 Formal
Group
Activities
 
 Jigsaw
 Description:

 This strategy is designed on the philosophy that we learn something best by teaching it. Jigsaw requires students to become experts on a sub-set of the content and then to teach the content to classmates. In this way each member of the learning team becomes an important Jigsaw puzzle piece for the team’s understanding of all the content of the lesson. Useful
for: • encouraging students to take responsibility for their learning • complex topics that can be divided Instructions:

 1. Assign students to groups of 4 - 5. Divide the lesson into 4 or 5 key modules. Individual students in the group each become an expert on one of the key modules of the lesson. 2. Students first group together with their assigned group. Students identify the module for which they will be responsible. 3. Ask students to number off. All the number 1’s from the groups gather together to study Module 1. All the students with the number 2’s gather to study Module 2, etc. Now the original group is divided around the classroom with like-numbered students from other groups. Each student becomes an expert on the module to which he/she is assigned. 4. Carefully monitor students as they work through the modules. Take care to clarify content and check comprehension as students work to master learning. 5. When students believe they have mastered the content or skill of the lesson, ask them to develop a plan for teaching it to their teammates. Ask students to prepare a visual aid as a part of their teaching strategy. 6. Each student now returns to his/her original group. Students take turns teaching the content or skill of their Jigsaw module to the students in their group. 7. Again, the instructor should students as they teach to ensure correctness of content and skill. Provide ample time for questions and answers as groups move through the modules. 8. Optional activity - have students take a group quiz. Ideas
for
implementing:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  6. 6. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 Online
Group
Activity
­
Plan
 
 Instructor
Planning
 Course:

 
 Topic(s)
(broad
topic
specific
topics
to
be
addressed
by
the
activity)
 
 
 Activity
Goal
(what
do
you
want
students
to
get
out
of
this
activity?
This
is
your
 reflection
and
plan)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Activity
Type
(project,
discussion,
case,
jigsaw,
etc.)
 
 
 
 Activity
Description
(what
do
you
want
them
to
do
‐
be
specific)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Group
Description
(how
many
members
per
group,
will
you
require
roles,
will
 students
be
assigned)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  7. 7. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 Assessment
(product,
process,
both?
Grading
scheme,
rubric
(will
you
provide
 ahead?),
etc.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Tool(s)
(what
tool
in
your
CMS
will
you
use?
Why?
How?,
etc)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Additional
thoughts?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Information
for
Students
(formal
statements
to
give
to
students)
 Learning
Outcomes
(should
derive
from
your
goal(s)
and
be
stated
in
formal
terms)
 
 
 
 
 
 Instructions
/
Activity
Description
(describe
clearly
the
activity,
including
readings,
 required
assignments,
etc)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando

  8. 8. Can
I
Really
Do
That
Online?

Effective
Student
Interaction
with
Groups
 Rhonda
D.
Blackburn
and
Christine
Salmon,
University
of
Texas
at
Dallas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Group
Design
and
Process
(tell
students
why
and
how
to
work
together,
what
to
do
 if
group
isn’t
working,
etc.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Activity
Submission
(tell
students
where
and
how
to
submit
their
activity;
include
 any
specific
requirements
about
names,
file
titles,
sizes,
etc)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Grading
(provide
the
grading
scheme,
rubric,
etc.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Other
(anything
else
you
need
to
tell
students
that
doesn’t
fit
above)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BbWorld
2010,
Orlando


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