Get started with easy
             home conservation!
             Identifying energy vampires, installing Energy Star app...
6 Set your computer to power save mode and 8 Avoid overheating or overcooling the home.
    turn off the computer when not...
Do you have phantom loads in your home?
Don’t get spooked by your energy bill
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, ...
Additional home conservation resources

                            EnergyStar appliances
                            ENER...
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United Streaming Information Teacher Passcode: XXXX-XXXX Please ...

  1. 1. Get started with easy home conservation! Identifying energy vampires, installing Energy Star appliances and taking other simple steps will lower your carbon footprint and save money. 10 steps to getting started 1 Find the energy vampires (or phantom loads). Look into how much energy your appliances waste while in standby mode. One way to do this is to use a Kill A Watt meter, which helps you identify what appliances are using the most electricity and which appliances should be replaced. You can borrow a Kill A Watt meter from the CEC. 2 Plug appliances into a “Smart” Power Strip. Turn off your most wasteful appliances by plugging them into a power strip. The “Smart” Power Strip has one master plug (which stays on all the time) and five special plugs (which go off when the master device is not in use.) This device is great for computer and home entertainment systems, as it senses when your TV or computer have been turned off and automatically cuts power to your peripheral devices (speakers, printer, monitor, and VCR) to eliminate their phantom loads. 3 Conduct a home energy audit. Flex Your Power offers a do-it-yourself home energy audit to help you prioritize energy efficiency upgrades. www.fypower.org/res/energyaudit/diy.html 4 Only purchase new electronics that use little energy. For efficiency recommendations, visit the U.S. Department of Energy website. www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/ 5 Purchase Energy Star appliances. If looking for new household products, look for ones that have earned the ENERGY STAR rating, which meet strict energy efficiency guidelines set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy. When making larger improvements to your home, ENERGY STAR offers tools and resources, including advice on insulation, heating and cooling, common home problems and appliance replacement recommendations. www.energystar.gov. (More on back page.) Community Environmental Council • 26 W. Anapamu, SB, CA, 93101 • (805) 963-0583 www.FossilFreeBy33.org • www.CECSB.org • www.GetEnergized.org
  2. 2. 6 Set your computer to power save mode and 8 Avoid overheating or overcooling the home. turn off the computer when not in use. Set the furnace thermostat down 3 to 5° F and the air conditioner thermostat up 5° F. Lowering the Power save mode will make your screen go dark temperature 3 to 5° F can save you up to 20% on if you have not touched it in a while. Your computer heating costs, and raising the temperature 5° F can is still ready to use with just a click of the mouse. save you save up to 10% on air conditioning costs. • Windows Vista/XP: Control heat and cooling losses by closing doors and Go to the Control Panel under the Start Menu windows when the air conditioner or heater is running. and select Performance and Maintenance> Power Options. Set the “Turn off Monitor” to how long you would like your monitor to idle before power-save mode. • Mac: Click on the Apple icon at the top of your screen and select System Preferences. Click the Energy Saver icon. Using the slider, select how long you would like your monitor to remain idle before power-save mode. 7 Replace incandescent light bulbs with CFLs. Compact fluorescent light bulbs use 75% less energy and last 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. Find out more at CEC’s fact sheet: Getting Started with 9 Run dishwasher & clothes washer when full Better Lighting at www.FossilFreeBy33.org. & during off-peak hours. Fewer loads reduce water and energy use. Turn off the “heat dry” setting on the dishwasher, and wash your clothes in cold water (About 90% of the energy use in Computer Energy Savings a clothes washer goes to water heating.) Running appliances during off-peak hours also reduces Should you turn your computer off or just let it statewide peak energy demand. “hibernate”? You may hear conflicting information; however the U.S. Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy recommends turning off the monitor if you are not going to use your computer for more than 20 minutes and turning off the entire system if you are not going to use your computer for two hours. The Microsoft Small Business Center says that with new “hibernate” and “sleep” features, it doesn’t matter whether you turn your computer off or not. However, everyone agrees that it is important to set your computer to power-save mode. ENERGY STAR computers in power-save mode use 15 watts, which is about 70 percent less electricity than a computer without power management features. Install low flow toilets, shower heads and The U.S. EPA estimates that over 11 billion kilowatt faucet aerators. hours (kWh) could be saved through computer As much as 19% of California electricity is used to monitor power management. That’s enough energy pump, transport and treat water. Ultra-low-flush toilets to power over one million households for a year, use approximately 20,000 gallons less water annually and carbon dioxide reductions equivalent to than older models. Low-flow shower heads and faucet preventing the emissions from 1.5 million cars or aerators can reduce home water consumption and planting 2.5 million acres of trees. water heating costs by as much as 50%.
  3. 3. Do you have phantom loads in your home? Don’t get spooked by your energy bill According to the U.S. Department of Energy, 75 percent of the electricity used to power home electronic equipment is consumed while the products are turned off. Receivers for televisions and VCRs, for example, use almost as much electricity when they are switched off as when they are on, and any small appliance with a timer, clock, memory or remote on/off switch uses energy just by being plugged into an outlet. The average American household constantly leaks about 50 watts of electricity — four percent of the home’s total electricity use. It may not sound like much, but it becomes significant when you add up all the audio systems, garage-door openers, clock radios, phone/ answering machines, microwave ovens, DVD players, computers, coffee machines and televisions just standing by, waiting to be used. In fact, the amount of energy wasted by these “phantom loads” in the U.S. is equivalent to seven large electrical generating plants. Examples of some of the appliances most commonly associated with “phantom loads,” which cost U.S. consumers about $3 billion a year.
  4. 4. Additional home conservation resources EnergyStar appliances ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy to help save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient practices. Energy-efficient choices can save families about a third of their energy bill without sacrificing features, style or comfort. ENERGY STAR appliances range from refrigerators and electronics to home heating and cooling equipment. Over its lifetime, ENERGY STAR-qualified equipment in a single home office (e.g., computer, monitor, printer, and fax) can save enough electricity to light an entire home for more than four years. Learn more at www.EnergyStar.gov CEC’s Get Started series CEC has a collection of easy to read, informational brochures to help you learn more about energy conservation at home. Vist our website at www.FossilFreeBy33.org to also download: Get started with solar; Get started with water heating; and Get started with better lighting. You can also request a hard copy by calling us at (805) 963-0583. CEC’s Get Energized! pledge Take CEC’s personal action pledge to reduce your carbon footprint. The pledge will calculate how many pounds of CO2 (and dollars from your budget) that you will save by taking energy-saving actions. Get Energized also offers monthly campaigns on new ways to save energy, as well as profiles of Santa Barbara residents sharing their personal stories and tips for living green. Visit www.GetEnergized.org to take the pledge, sign up for monthly e-newsletters, and to find information on energy conservation, renewable energy, relocalization and more. CEC’s online Amazon store CEC has setup an online store thru Amazon.com (astore.amazon.com/getener-20) filled with resources mentioned in our Get Started series of brochures. Order a “Smart” Power Strip or Kill A Watt through our store and a portion of your purchase is donated to CEC! Community Environmental Council CEC is one of the oldest environmental organizations in southern California, having been founded in 1970 as a result of the oil spill off Santa Barbara’s shores. Over the last three decades, CEC has pioneered real-life solutions for the community in the areas of pesticide reduction, organic agriculture, green building, hazardous waste collection and recycling. Today CEC is focused on eliminating the use of fossil fuels in our region within the next generation. Promoting energy conservation is one of several strategies that CEC has outlined to reach this aggressive goal in our report A New Energy Direction: A Blueprint for Santa Barbara County. For information on the campaign or to get involved, visit www.FossilFreeBy33.org Community Environmental Council • 26 W. Anapamu, SB, CA, 93101 • (805) 963-0583 www.FossilFreeBy33.org • www.CECSB.org • www.GetEnergized.org

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