Welcome to The 2011POWER OF TEN Regional Summit<br />
2011 Summit Co-Hosts<br />
2011 Summit Sponsors<br />
2011 Summit Partners<br />
Welcome to The 2011POWER OF TEN Regional Summit<br />
Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastr...
2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
2011 Summit Co-Hosts<br />
2011 Summit Sponsors<br />
2011 Summit Partners<br />
Head Table<br />Jo Ann Graves<br />John Schroer<br />Karl Dean<br />Gary Scott<br />Bridget Jones<br />Carol Pedigo<br />P...
Honored Guests<br />The Honorable Bill Haslam<br />The Honorable John Hickenlooper<br />Alan Matheson<br />John Frece<br /...
Special Guest<br />Bill Haslam<br />Governor of Tennessee<br />
National Keynote Speaker<br />John Hickenlooper<br />Governor of Colorado<br />
Regional Keynote Speaker<br />Alan Matheson<br />Executive Director of Envision Utah<br />
Bringing the Vision to Life:The Envision Utah Experience<br />“The future is not some place we’re going to, but a place we...
Great Things are Happening in Utah!<br />#1 Best State for Business and Careers, 2010 – Forbes<br />1st in the Nation for ...
The “Utah Model”National Recognition of Utah Collaboration<br />“As a practicing professional planner, I’ve found it refre...
Regional Visioning<br />A revolution in “scale appropriate” problem solving<br />Empowers regions to enhance quality of li...
History of Planning in Utah<br />
Utah Faced Serious Challenges in 1997 <br />A million new residents by 2020<br />Air quality at risk<br />Doubling urban l...
Formed in 1997 to evaluate and address growth issues<br />Nonprofit, nonpartisan, voluntary<br />Partnership of business, ...
Greater Wasatch Area<br /><ul><li>10 Counties
  90 Cities and Towns
  157 Special Service Districts</li></ul>Over 500 City 	Council Members<br />Over 500 Planning Commissioners<br />30 Count...
Broad Scope of Community<br />Business Leaders<br />Developers<br />Utility Companies<br />Local and State Government<br /...
The Premise of Envision Utah<br />The “public” has the right to choose its future—public officials should serve that visio...
Improved Process<br />VALUES  (What do people want?)<br />          VISION (How will our Region provide it?)<br />			   ST...
Regional Visioning Starts with Regional Values<br />Values are stable and enduring; life’s “tides” as opposed to the “wave...
Public Workshops<br />Hundreds ofmeetings with thousandsof participants<br />
Life in Utah<br />Peace                       of Mind<br />PERSONAL VALUES<br />Self Esteem<br />Personal    Enjoyment<br ...
To be sustainable, a region must satisfy the values, hopes, and dreams of present and future residents<br />
Values for Creating Great Communities<br />
Personal Growth and WELL-BEING<br />Service Opportunities<br />Access to Nature<br />Introspection & Pondering<br />Spirit...
education<br />Neighborhood Schools<br />Lifelong Learning<br />Higher Education<br />
Community<br />Community Identity & Activities<br />Community Interactions<br />Neighborliness<br />
NATURE<br />Environmental Preservation<br />Access to Nature<br />Contemplative Settings<br />
FAMILY<br />Time Together<br />Family Interaction<br />Quality Recreational Activities<br />
security<br />Eyes on the Street<br />Peace of Mind<br />Fewer Accidents<br />
Use Scenarios to Evaluate and Present Choices<br />
Scenario Approach:Contrasts today’s choices by showing long-term consequences<br />
Our Region’s Future<br />Regional Choices and Outcomes<br />			 Environment<br />Transportation<br />Land Use<br />Energy ...
Scenario ANew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> Continuation of Recent Trends
 Larger lot sizes
 More auto-oriented development will occur.</li></li></ul><li>Scenario BNew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> Baselin...
 Dispersed development pattern common in last 20-30 years</li></li></ul><li>Scenario CNew and Existing Development<br /><u...
 Growth on new land focused into walkable, transit-oriented communities</li></li></ul><li>Scenario DNew and Existing Devel...
 Extensive infill and redevelopment
 Extensive transit system</li></li></ul><li>Land Consumption<br />Analysis<br />
Vehicle Miles of Travel Per Day<br />
Total EmissionsTons Per Day<br />
Housing Mix: Current and 2020<br />
Total Infrastructure Costs<br />
Choosing a Scenario(Weighted vs. Unweighted Results)<br />Unweighted results (as represented by the black dashed line) are...
QUALITY GROWTH STRATEGYSix Goals, 42 Strategies<br />Enhance Air Quality<br />Increase Transportation Choices<br />Preserv...
Envision Utah Toolbox  & Training Sessions<br />Trained over 3000 key stakeholders  (realtors, elected officials, planning...
PUBLIC AWARENESS EFFORTS<br />Television, Radio and Newspaper<br />
Quality Growth Demonstration Projects<br /><ul><li> Requests for Town or Site Specific Community Design Workshop
 Design Standards
 Specialized Ordinances
 Master Plans
 Inter-local Agreements</li></li></ul><li>Blueprint Jordan River<br />
Reaching Out to Rural Communities<br />
The Wasatch Choice for 2040<br />
Is it worth it?<br />
Growth Strategy Implemented<br />save $4.5 billion in future infrastructure costs over the next 20 years<br />conserve mor...
Mountain View Corridor – a multimodal parallel corridor to I-15<br />An Envision Utah process saved millions of dollars an...
Utah’s Public Transportation<br />Do you favor or oppose the EXPANSION of light rail, often referred to as TRAX, and other...
Preparing for Future Transit<br />$185 million acquisition <br /> Purchased 175    miles of  rail     right-of-way<br /> C...
Existing Rail System<br />TRAX light rail – 15-mile Sandy/Salt Lake Line, opened Dec. 1999<br />TRAX light rail – 2.5-mile...
FrontLines 2015<br /><ul><li>UTA’s project in its history
Building 70 miles of rail in seven years
One project that includes five lines
Mid-Jordan TRAX
West Valley TRAX
FrontRunner South
Draper TRAX
Airport TRAX</li></li></ul><li>HUD Livable and Sustainable Communities grant supports Utah’s efforts to implement the Wasa...
Implementing the Wasatch Choice for 2040:<br /><ul><li>Creating a framework for collaboration
Communicating the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)
Developing a Regional Housing Plan
Creating tools for decision-making
Testing the concepts
Sharing the knowledge-base</li></li></ul><li>The  framework  for collaboration: Partnerships to plan for growth and develo...
The  Regional Transportation  Plan: <br />Assumes implementation of WC2040<br /><ul><li>Regional approach: WFRC, MAG, MPO,...
Multi-modal
Capacity safety and preservation of existing roadway system
Comprehensive transit system: Bus Rapid Transit, streetcar and bus to complement rail system</li></li></ul><li>Utah’s  Fir...
Focus on housing choice</li></li></ul><li>Tools  for  decision-making:  <br />The Envision Tomorrow + Model (ET+)<br />Pre...
Testing  the Concepts:  Six demonstration sites where ET+ will be applied in a collaborative process<br />3900 South TRAX ...
Sharing the Knowledge –base: The WC 2040 Toolbox<br />Regional Visioning<br />Envision Tomorrow +<br />Transportation and ...
Changing Attitudes<br />
1997<br />
2004<br />
Bringing the Vision to Life:The Envision Utah Experience<br />“The future is not some place we’re going to, but a place we...
2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
15 Minute Break<br />
15 Minute Break<br />
2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastr...
Middle Tennessee Regional Leaders Panel<br />“Making it Happen through the POWER OF TEN”<br />
Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastr...
Transportation/Transit<br />Michael Skipper<br />Ed Cole<br />
Land Use – Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Marion Fowlkes<br />Rick Bernhardt<br />
Infrastructure Investment<br />Everett Cowan<br />Scott Potter<br />
Open Space Conservation<br />Darwin Newton<br />Julian Bibb<br />
Air and Water Quality and Quantity<br />Larry McElroy<br />Bob Martineau<br />
Economic Competitiveness<br />Bert Mathews<br />Susan Whitaker<br />
Michael Skipper<br />Executive Director of the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization <br />
Development Pattern, 1965-2035<br />2035<br />2,600,000<br />(In 2035, the Nashville region will be <br />about the size o...
Resiliency in Urban Congestion<br />2030 <br />w/ Short-Term Improvements<br />2030 <br />After Long-Term Improvements<br ...
New Guiding Principles<br />Livability - Work to enhance the quality of life in the region by supporting initiatives that ...
#1A Bold, New Vision for Mass Transit<br />#2Support for Active Transportation & Walkable Communities<br />#3Preservation ...
Ed Cole<br />Executive Director of the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee<br />
Marion Fowlkes<br />Principal of Centric Architecture and CRT Co-Chair<br />
Quality Growth Toolbox<br />
Rick Bernhardt<br />Executive Director of Nashville Metro Planning Department <br />
Regional Pilots…<br />
Quality Growth Toolbox<br />“All of the concepts, ideas, strategies, tools, and resources presented in the Toolbox greatly...
Quality Growth Toolbox<br />“Successful implementation of Quality Growth will require collaboration among all of us as nev...
Toolbox Lead Partners<br />
Everett Cowan<br />CEO of AE Guidance and CRT Director <br />
Infrastructure In 10 County RegionConceptual, Planning, Design, or Construction Phase (GNRC)<br />Water/ Waste Water		1.8 ...
Infrastructure Report Card by ASCE<br /><ul><li>Recreation			D+
Rail				C
Bridges			B-
Roads			B-
Schools			C+
Transit			D
Water/ Wastewater	C</li></li></ul><li>Scott Potter<br />Director of Metro Water Services<br />
Darwin Newton<br />Retired State Soil Scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and CRT Director<br />
Value of Agriculture Economy in Robertson County<br />
Value of Agriculture Economy in the Region<br />
ACCESS<br />GREENPRINT<br />MANUAL<br />
Layers<br /><ul><li>30 layers or data sets of information comprise current Greenprint
Data from wide variety of sources: USGS, TNGIS, NPS, TWRA, TDOT, ECD</li></li></ul><li>Uses for the Greenprint<br /><ul><l...
Projecting different data sets
Comparing scenarios
Setting Priorities
Balancing projects with conservation concerns</li></li></ul><li>Sumner County Open Space Comprehensive Plan Case Study<br />
Julian Bibb<br />Attorney for Stites and Harbison, PLLC and CRT Director <br />
Nashville’s Open Space Plan<br />NASHVILLE:<br />NATURALLY<br />
Four Corners, Nine Bends and a Heart of Green<br />NASHVILLE:<br />NATURALLY<br />A VISION FOR DAVIDSON COUNTY<br /><ul><l...
Protected land in each bend of the Cumberland River
A vibrantly green downtown</li></li></ul><li>22,000 additional acres protected by 2035<br />Four Corners:<br /><ul><li>Min...
Minimum 6,000 acres privately protected</li></ul>Nine Bends:<br /><ul><li>10,000 acres of floodplain and other sensitive area
1,500 acres of agricultural land </li></ul>Heart of Green:<br /><ul><li>Add small parks and landscaped gateways
Turn 110 acres of paved surface to natural or pervious</li></ul> Implementation Goals<br />NASHVILLE::<br />NATURALLY<br />
An open space system is essential to the viability of a region that markets itself on its ‘quality of life’ <br />.<br />T...
 Middle TN Regional Natural Resources<br />NASHVILLE::<br />NATURALLY<br />
Larry McElroy<br />General Manger of Consolidated Utility District of Rutherford County<br />
Water is our most precious natural resource. With only 3 percent of the world’s water existing as fresh water, nearly ever...
Housing Density - 1980<br />
Housing Density - 1990<br />
Housing Density - 2010<br />
Housing Density - 2020<br />
Housing Density - 2030<br />
Cumberland River Basin <br />Municipal and Industrial Water Supply Intakes<br />
Water Manufacturing Plants?<br />Water Treatment Plants<br />Wastewater Plants<br />
Bob Martineau<br />Commissioner of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation<br />
Air Quality: Challenges and Priorities<br />Bob Martineau, Commissioner<br />Tennessee Department of Environment and Conse...
The Big Picture<br />Air is cleaner in Tennessee than anytime in the last 40 years – since the passage of the Clean Air Ac...
How to Attain Stricter EPA Ozone Standard?<br />Reducing combustion emissions from: <br />Power Plants & Industry         ...
The Power of Ten Regional Summit <br />2008 TDEC emissions inventory data <br />
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  • So what have we been up to with the Toolbox… let’s take a look.
  • Click to access the system, or download the manual from the site as a .PDF file. The manual contains detailed instructions for using the system, and a comprehensive overview of the system’s capabilities.
  • The chief value of the system is the data. The data is collected in different data sets, which can be displayed as individual layers.
  • This presentation has shown a number of individual layers of data featured in the system. But the best use of the Greenprint Tools for Quality Growth is in analyzing data, looking at data sets together, and using the data to set priorities. The goal of this system, like greenprinting in general, is to guide growth management in the context of conservation concerns.
  • TN meets EPA’s current ground level ozone standard across the state.Middle Tennessee Attains The 1997 Ozone NAAQS of 84 ppbIn 2008, EPA announced that the Ozone NAAQS was being made more restrictive to a level of 75 ppb.. In 2010, EPA announced that it was deferring action on the 2008 standard and reconsidering it to be made even more restrictive to between 60 –70 ppb.Depending on the stringency EPA selects, much of Middle TN could be nonattainmentDecision from EPA on the Ground Level Ozone NAAQS expected end of July 2011. Tennessee will recommend attainment/nonattainment boundaries, but it is EPA that makes the final designation.The five county area of Davidson, Rutherford, Williamson, Wilson and Sumner Counties would likely be designated nonattainment. The counties of Cheatham, Dickson and Robertson would be under increased scrutiny to be excused from a federal designation of nonattainment.Will need to look at other counties and justify their exclusion from the recommendation
  • Combustion emissions and evaporative emissions of volatile organic compounds will need further controlTVA is adding air pollution control devices at its newer coal-fired power plants, re-powering to cleaner fuels &amp; technologies such as gas-fired combined cycle turbines and retiring its older plants.Vehicles and the fuels that propel them are being addressed at the federal level. As the fleet turns over with more newer vehicles, air quality should continue to improve.Ultra low sulfur diesel fuelEmission filtration systemsVehicle emissions testingIncreased mass transit options and usageEnergy efficiency: programs will need to be developed to use less fossil fuels – could be transportation or electric power use based programsEnergy efficiency can—Reduce current and future energy demandsIncrease reliability of energy supplyLower household and business costsIncrease industrial competitivenessReduce overall environmental impact
  • 2008 data
  • Poor air quality harms human health and the region’s economy. What can the region’s leaders do to improve air quality
  • 2011 summit powerpoint presentation

    1. 1. Welcome to The 2011POWER OF TEN Regional Summit<br />
    2. 2. 2011 Summit Co-Hosts<br />
    3. 3. 2011 Summit Sponsors<br />
    4. 4. 2011 Summit Partners<br />
    5. 5. Welcome to The 2011POWER OF TEN Regional Summit<br />
    6. 6. Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastructure<br />Open Space Conservation<br />Air and Water Quantity and Quality<br />Economic Competitiveness <br />
    7. 7. 2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
    8. 8. 2011 Summit Co-Hosts<br />
    9. 9. 2011 Summit Sponsors<br />
    10. 10. 2011 Summit Partners<br />
    11. 11. Head Table<br />Jo Ann Graves<br />John Schroer<br />Karl Dean<br />Gary Scott<br />Bridget Jones<br />Carol Pedigo<br />Paul Latture<br />Ralph Schulz<br />Jim Burton<br />Jeanie Nelson<br />Susan Taylor<br />John L Batey<br />Marion Fowlkes<br />
    12. 12. Honored Guests<br />The Honorable Bill Haslam<br />The Honorable John Hickenlooper<br />Alan Matheson<br />John Frece<br />Geoff Anderson<br />SalinGeevarghese<br />
    13. 13. Special Guest<br />Bill Haslam<br />Governor of Tennessee<br />
    14. 14. National Keynote Speaker<br />John Hickenlooper<br />Governor of Colorado<br />
    15. 15. Regional Keynote Speaker<br />Alan Matheson<br />Executive Director of Envision Utah<br />
    16. 16. Bringing the Vision to Life:The Envision Utah Experience<br />“The future is not some place we’re going to, but a place we are creating. The paths to it are not found, they are made.”<br /> Jane Garvey<br />
    17. 17. Great Things are Happening in Utah!<br />#1 Best State for Business and Careers, 2010 – Forbes<br />1st in the Nation for Economic Outlook, 2010 – ALEC-Laffer, Rich States Poor States<br />1st for Competitive Environment, 2010 – ALEC-Laffer, Rich States Poor States<br />1st for Best Quality of Life 2010 – Business Facilities<br />1st for Economic Dynamism, 2008 – Kauffman Foundation<br />1st for Technology Concentration and Dynamism, 2009 – Milken Institute<br />#1 Most Fiscally Fit State 2010 - Forbes<br />1st for Best Managed State in the Nation – The Pew Center<br />2nd Best Pro-Business State, 2010 – Pollina Report<br />2nd Best Education Climate, 2010 – Business Facilities<br />5th Best City for the Next Decade Salt Lake City 2010 - Kiplinger<br />
    18. 18. The “Utah Model”National Recognition of Utah Collaboration<br />“As a practicing professional planner, I’ve found it refreshing to visit a region that is so intently focused on moving forward with high value placed on the quality of civic engagement, and with leaders so committed to the value of place — and collaborative decision making.”<br /> -- David Boyd, Citiwire (August 2010)<br />“While much of the nation sputters along, Utah continues to reinvent itself in dramatic ways.”<br /> -- Allen Best, Planning Magazine (October 2010)<br />“The most cited success is Envision Utah.”<br /> -- The Washington Post (June 2006)<br />
    19. 19. Regional Visioning<br />A revolution in “scale appropriate” problem solving<br />Empowers regions to enhance quality of life and successfully compete in the new global paradigm<br />Regional Visioning is the <br />Natural Evolution of “Place Making”<br /> to a Larger Scale<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. History of Planning in Utah<br />
    22. 22. Utah Faced Serious Challenges in 1997 <br />A million new residents by 2020<br />Air quality at risk<br />Doubling urban land by 2020<br />New water sources needed by 2010<br />Crowding and congestion increasing<br />Business and personal costs rising<br />Infrastructure needs outstripping resources<br />
    23. 23. Formed in 1997 to evaluate and address growth issues<br />Nonprofit, nonpartisan, voluntary<br />Partnership of business, government, community<br />
    24. 24. Greater Wasatch Area<br /><ul><li>10 Counties
    25. 25. 90 Cities and Towns
    26. 26. 157 Special Service Districts</li></ul>Over 500 City Council Members<br />Over 500 Planning Commissioners<br />30 County Commissioners<br />90 Mayors<br />100’s of developers, realtors and other key stakeholders<br />
    27. 27. Broad Scope of Community<br />Business Leaders<br />Developers<br />Utility Companies<br />Local and State Government<br />Conservation and Citizen Groups<br />Religious Leaders<br />Education <br />Media<br />
    28. 28. The Premise of Envision Utah<br />The “public” has the right to choose its future—public officials should serve that vision<br />The “public” will make good choices if presented with real options <br />
    29. 29. Improved Process<br />VALUES (What do people want?)<br /> VISION (How will our Region provide it?)<br /> STRATEGY (How do we implement?)<br />PLAN<br /> FUND<br /> BUILD<br />
    30. 30. Regional Visioning Starts with Regional Values<br />Values are stable and enduring; life’s “tides” as opposed to the “waves.”<br />Values are widely shared and create consensus among diverse groups.<br />Satisfying ones’ values is the foundation of personal decision making.<br />
    31. 31. Public Workshops<br />Hundreds ofmeetings with thousandsof participants<br />
    32. 32. Life in Utah<br />Peace of Mind<br />PERSONAL VALUES<br />Self Esteem<br />Personal Enjoyment<br />Self Satisfaction<br />Personal Security<br />Self Esteem<br />Family Love<br />Accomplishment<br />Freedom<br />Makes Me Happy<br />PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES<br />Better Quality of Life<br />Get Along With Others<br />In Control<br />Feel Healthy<br />Do a Better Job<br />Less Worry<br />Less Stress<br />Spend Time With Family<br />Feel Good<br />Feel Safe<br />Do Other Things<br />Buy Other Things<br />Commonly Held Ideas<br />Become a Victim of Crime<br />FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES<br />Children Handle Life’s Problems<br />Save Time<br />Will (Not) Be Sick<br />More Crowds<br />More Car Accidents<br />Save Money<br />Children Learn More<br />Gain Knowledge<br />Have More Choices<br />Affordable Living<br />Crime<br />ATTRIBUTES<br />Climate<br />Educational System<br />LDS Church<br />Outdoor Recreation<br />Air Quality<br />High Income Level<br />Population Growth<br />Good Place for Family/Children<br />Traffic<br />Taxes<br />Scenic Beauty<br />Infrastructure<br />The People<br />
    33. 33. To be sustainable, a region must satisfy the values, hopes, and dreams of present and future residents<br />
    34. 34. Values for Creating Great Communities<br />
    35. 35. Personal Growth and WELL-BEING<br />Service Opportunities<br />Access to Nature<br />Introspection & Pondering<br />Spirituality<br />Physical Wellness<br />
    36. 36. education<br />Neighborhood Schools<br />Lifelong Learning<br />Higher Education<br />
    37. 37. Community<br />Community Identity & Activities<br />Community Interactions<br />Neighborliness<br />
    38. 38. NATURE<br />Environmental Preservation<br />Access to Nature<br />Contemplative Settings<br />
    39. 39. FAMILY<br />Time Together<br />Family Interaction<br />Quality Recreational Activities<br />
    40. 40. security<br />Eyes on the Street<br />Peace of Mind<br />Fewer Accidents<br />
    41. 41. Use Scenarios to Evaluate and Present Choices<br />
    42. 42. Scenario Approach:Contrasts today’s choices by showing long-term consequences<br />
    43. 43. Our Region’s Future<br />Regional Choices and Outcomes<br /> Environment<br />Transportation<br />Land Use<br />Energy Use<br />Housing<br />Opportunities<br />Job Creation<br />Ag Land Consumption<br />Open Space<br />Water Use<br />Air Quality<br />Traffic<br />Miles of Driving<br />
    44. 44. Scenario ANew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> Continuation of Recent Trends
    45. 45. Larger lot sizes
    46. 46. More auto-oriented development will occur.</li></li></ul><li>Scenario BNew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> Baseline - implement adopted plans
    47. 47. Dispersed development pattern common in last 20-30 years</li></li></ul><li>Scenario CNew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> More infill and redevelopment
    48. 48. Growth on new land focused into walkable, transit-oriented communities</li></li></ul><li>Scenario DNew and Existing Development<br /><ul><li> Significant increase in densities
    49. 49. Extensive infill and redevelopment
    50. 50. Extensive transit system</li></li></ul><li>Land Consumption<br />Analysis<br />
    51. 51.
    52. 52. Vehicle Miles of Travel Per Day<br />
    53. 53. Total EmissionsTons Per Day<br />
    54. 54. Housing Mix: Current and 2020<br />
    55. 55. Total Infrastructure Costs<br />
    56. 56. Choosing a Scenario(Weighted vs. Unweighted Results)<br />Unweighted results (as represented by the black dashed line) are nearly identical to weighted results<br />
    57. 57. QUALITY GROWTH STRATEGYSix Goals, 42 Strategies<br />Enhance Air Quality<br />Increase Transportation Choices<br />Preserve Critical Lands<br />Conserve Water Resources<br />Provide Housing Opportunities<br />Maximize Efficiency in Public Investments<br />
    58. 58. Envision Utah Toolbox & Training Sessions<br />Trained over 3000 key stakeholders (realtors, elected officials, planning commissioners, community councils, professional planners, developers and other interested citizens)<br />Urban Planning Tools for Quality Growth<br />
    59. 59. PUBLIC AWARENESS EFFORTS<br />Television, Radio and Newspaper<br />
    60. 60. Quality Growth Demonstration Projects<br /><ul><li> Requests for Town or Site Specific Community Design Workshop
    61. 61. Design Standards
    62. 62. Specialized Ordinances
    63. 63. Master Plans
    64. 64. Inter-local Agreements</li></li></ul><li>Blueprint Jordan River<br />
    65. 65.
    66. 66. Reaching Out to Rural Communities<br />
    67. 67. The Wasatch Choice for 2040<br />
    68. 68. Is it worth it?<br />
    69. 69. Growth Strategy Implemented<br />save $4.5 billion in future infrastructure costs over the next 20 years<br />conserve more land (171 square miles)<br />provide more housing choices<br />lower emissions resulting in less pollution<br />reduce water consumption<br />make our transportation system more efficient with less congestion on the roads<br />
    70. 70. Mountain View Corridor – a multimodal parallel corridor to I-15<br />An Envision Utah process saved millions of dollars and years of delay<br />
    71. 71. Utah’s Public Transportation<br />Do you favor or oppose the EXPANSION of light rail, often referred to as TRAX, and other public transportation systems?<br />Total<br />Favor<br /> 88%<br />Total<br />Oppose<br />10%<br />
    72. 72. Preparing for Future Transit<br />$185 million acquisition <br /> Purchased 175 miles of rail right-of-way<br /> Created nine future transit corridors<br />
    73. 73. Existing Rail System<br />TRAX light rail – 15-mile Sandy/Salt Lake Line, opened Dec. 1999<br />TRAX light rail – 2.5-mile University Line, opened Dec. 2001<br />TRAX light rail – 1.5-mile Medical Center Line, opened Sept. 2003 <br />TRAX light rail – 1-mile Intermodal Hub Extension, opened April 2008<br />FrontRunner – 44-mile commuter rail line from Ogden to Salt Lake City, opened April 2008<br />
    74. 74. FrontLines 2015<br /><ul><li>UTA’s project in its history
    75. 75. Building 70 miles of rail in seven years
    76. 76. One project that includes five lines
    77. 77. Mid-Jordan TRAX
    78. 78. West Valley TRAX
    79. 79. FrontRunner South
    80. 80. Draper TRAX
    81. 81. Airport TRAX</li></li></ul><li>HUD Livable and Sustainable Communities grant supports Utah’s efforts to implement the Wasatch Choice for 2040—our regional vision<br />
    82. 82. Implementing the Wasatch Choice for 2040:<br /><ul><li>Creating a framework for collaboration
    83. 83. Communicating the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)
    84. 84. Developing a Regional Housing Plan
    85. 85. Creating tools for decision-making
    86. 86. Testing the concepts
    87. 87. Sharing the knowledge-base</li></li></ul><li>The framework for collaboration: Partnerships to plan for growth and development<br />
    88. 88. The Regional Transportation Plan: <br />Assumes implementation of WC2040<br /><ul><li>Regional approach: WFRC, MAG, MPO, RTP
    89. 89. Multi-modal
    90. 90. Capacity safety and preservation of existing roadway system
    91. 91. Comprehensive transit system: Bus Rapid Transit, streetcar and bus to complement rail system</li></li></ul><li>Utah’s First Regional Housing Plan: Completed by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Utah<br /><ul><li>Market driven
    92. 92. Focus on housing choice</li></li></ul><li>Tools for decision-making: <br />The Envision Tomorrow + Model (ET+)<br />Predictive Growth Model<br />Building and Land Use Types<br />Building Energy Consumption<br />7D Transportation Effects<br />Return of Investment<br />H + T Costs<br />Air Quality and Climate Impacts<br />Fiscal Impact<br />Public Health<br />Employment Growth<br />Employment Resilience<br />Development Capital<br />Redevelopment Timing<br />Water Consumption<br />Transportation Safety<br />Workforce Housing<br />LEED-ND Application<br />Public Assets<br />World’s foremost land-use impacts model<br />
    93. 93. Testing the Concepts: Six demonstration sites where ET+ will be applied in a collaborative process<br />3900 South TRAX Station – South Salt Lake City / Millcreek Township<br />10000 South – Sandy City<br />Magna Town Center <br />Provo Intermodal Hub<br />Salt Lake City Central Station <br />Salt Lake City Streetcar<br />
    94. 94. Sharing the Knowledge –base: The WC 2040 Toolbox<br />Regional Visioning<br />Envision Tomorrow +<br />Transportation and HousingPlans<br />Demonstration Sites<br />Form-Based Code<br />Innovative Financial Tools<br />
    95. 95. Changing Attitudes<br />
    96. 96. 1997<br />
    97. 97. 2004<br />
    98. 98.
    99. 99. Bringing the Vision to Life:The Envision Utah Experience<br />“The future is not some place we’re going to, but a place we are creating. The paths to it are not found, they are made.”<br /> Jane Garvey<br />
    100. 100. 2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
    101. 101. 15 Minute Break<br />
    102. 102. 15 Minute Break<br />
    103. 103. 2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
    104. 104. Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastructure<br />Open Space Conservation<br />Air and Water Quantity and Quality<br />Economic Competitiveness <br />
    105. 105. Middle Tennessee Regional Leaders Panel<br />“Making it Happen through the POWER OF TEN”<br />
    106. 106. Six Key Regional Issues<br />Transportation/Transit<br />Land Use/Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Infrastructure<br />Open Space Conservation<br />Air and Water Quantity and Quality<br />Economic Competitiveness <br />
    107. 107. Transportation/Transit<br />Michael Skipper<br />Ed Cole<br />
    108. 108. Land Use – Quality Growth and Sustainable Development<br />Marion Fowlkes<br />Rick Bernhardt<br />
    109. 109. Infrastructure Investment<br />Everett Cowan<br />Scott Potter<br />
    110. 110. Open Space Conservation<br />Darwin Newton<br />Julian Bibb<br />
    111. 111. Air and Water Quality and Quantity<br />Larry McElroy<br />Bob Martineau<br />
    112. 112. Economic Competitiveness<br />Bert Mathews<br />Susan Whitaker<br />
    113. 113. Michael Skipper<br />Executive Director of the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization <br />
    114. 114. Development Pattern, 1965-2035<br />2035<br />2,600,000<br />(In 2035, the Nashville region will be <br />about the size of the Denver region today)<br />2000<br />1,450,000<br />1965<br />750,000<br />Population<br />Properties affected by development<br />
    115. 115. Resiliency in Urban Congestion<br />2030 <br />w/ Short-Term Improvements<br />2030 <br />After Long-Term Improvements<br />TODAY<br />Congestion in Urban Areas Cannot Be Treated with Roadway Capacity Alone.<br />Daily Recurring Congestion on Major Roadways.<br />
    116. 116. New Guiding Principles<br />Livability - Work to enhance the quality of life in the region by supporting initiatives that increase opportunities for affordable housing, education, jobs, recreation, and civic involvement without increasing the burden on citizens to enjoy their community.<br />Sustainability – Strive to support growth and prosperity without sacrificing the health, environment, natural and socio-cultural resources, or financial stability of this or future generations.<br />Prosperity – Contribute to the continued economic well-being of the greater Nashville area by investing in transportation solutions that increase access to education, jobs, and amenities, reduce the cost of living and doing business, and attract new investment to the region.<br />Diversity – Recognize the multitude of needs and the variety of perspectives and backgrounds of the people that live and work in the greater Nashville area by promoting a range of transportation choices that are designed with sensitivity to the desired context.<br />
    117. 117. #1A Bold, New Vision for Mass Transit<br />#2Support for Active Transportation & Walkable Communities<br />#3Preservation & Enhancement of Strategic Roadways<br />
    118. 118. Ed Cole<br />Executive Director of the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee<br />
    119. 119. Marion Fowlkes<br />Principal of Centric Architecture and CRT Co-Chair<br />
    120. 120. Quality Growth Toolbox<br />
    121. 121. Rick Bernhardt<br />Executive Director of Nashville Metro Planning Department <br />
    122. 122. Regional Pilots…<br />
    123. 123. Quality Growth Toolbox<br />“All of the concepts, ideas, strategies, tools, and resources presented in the Toolbox greatly improve our Ten Counties and the Cumberland Region as a whole and guide our imminent growth in a way that insures our continued livability and economic vitality.”<br />
    124. 124. Quality Growth Toolbox<br />“Successful implementation of Quality Growth will require collaboration among all of us as never before. Quality communities and regions don’t just occur by happenstance. Desired community and economic development requires thoughtful approaches.”<br />
    125. 125. Toolbox Lead Partners<br />
    126. 126. Everett Cowan<br />CEO of AE Guidance and CRT Director <br />
    127. 127. Infrastructure In 10 County RegionConceptual, Planning, Design, or Construction Phase (GNRC)<br />Water/ Waste Water 1.8 B (60% of Total)<br />Other Utilities 435 K<br />Telecommunications 40 M<br />Storm Water 27.5 M<br />Solid Waste 14.7 M<br />Recreation 410 M<br />Law Enforcement 285 M<br /> Total 3.02 Billion<br />
    128. 128. Infrastructure Report Card by ASCE<br /><ul><li>Recreation D+
    129. 129. Rail C
    130. 130. Bridges B-
    131. 131. Roads B-
    132. 132. Schools C+
    133. 133. Transit D
    134. 134. Water/ Wastewater C</li></li></ul><li>Scott Potter<br />Director of Metro Water Services<br />
    135. 135. Darwin Newton<br />Retired State Soil Scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and CRT Director<br />
    136. 136. Value of Agriculture Economy in Robertson County<br />
    137. 137. Value of Agriculture Economy in the Region<br />
    138. 138. ACCESS<br />GREENPRINT<br />MANUAL<br />
    139. 139. Layers<br /><ul><li>30 layers or data sets of information comprise current Greenprint
    140. 140. Data from wide variety of sources: USGS, TNGIS, NPS, TWRA, TDOT, ECD</li></li></ul><li>Uses for the Greenprint<br /><ul><li>Analyzing Data
    141. 141. Projecting different data sets
    142. 142. Comparing scenarios
    143. 143. Setting Priorities
    144. 144. Balancing projects with conservation concerns</li></li></ul><li>Sumner County Open Space Comprehensive Plan Case Study<br />
    145. 145. Julian Bibb<br />Attorney for Stites and Harbison, PLLC and CRT Director <br />
    146. 146. Nashville’s Open Space Plan<br />NASHVILLE:<br />NATURALLY<br />
    147. 147. Four Corners, Nine Bends and a Heart of Green<br />NASHVILLE:<br />NATURALLY<br />A VISION FOR DAVIDSON COUNTY<br /><ul><li>Four anchor reserves, one in each quadrant of the county
    148. 148. Protected land in each bend of the Cumberland River
    149. 149. A vibrantly green downtown</li></li></ul><li>22,000 additional acres protected by 2035<br />Four Corners:<br /><ul><li>Minimum 6,000 acres added to the park system
    150. 150. Minimum 6,000 acres privately protected</li></ul>Nine Bends:<br /><ul><li>10,000 acres of floodplain and other sensitive area
    151. 151. 1,500 acres of agricultural land </li></ul>Heart of Green:<br /><ul><li>Add small parks and landscaped gateways
    152. 152. Turn 110 acres of paved surface to natural or pervious</li></ul> Implementation Goals<br />NASHVILLE::<br />NATURALLY<br />
    153. 153. An open space system is essential to the viability of a region that markets itself on its ‘quality of life’ <br />.<br />The Economic Argument<br />NASHVILLE:<br />NATURALLY<br />
    154. 154. Middle TN Regional Natural Resources<br />NASHVILLE::<br />NATURALLY<br />
    155. 155. Larry McElroy<br />General Manger of Consolidated Utility District of Rutherford County<br />
    156. 156. Water is our most precious natural resource. With only 3 percent of the world’s water existing as fresh water, nearly every continent is feeling the affects of the global water crisis. For some, it’s the lack of clean drinking water. For farmers, it’s the inability to feed the thirst of valuable crops. Just as “easy oil” has dried up, fresh water has become more difficult to access and transport.<br />
    157. 157. Housing Density - 1980<br />
    158. 158. Housing Density - 1990<br />
    159. 159. Housing Density - 2010<br />
    160. 160. Housing Density - 2020<br />
    161. 161. Housing Density - 2030<br />
    162. 162.
    163. 163. Cumberland River Basin <br />Municipal and Industrial Water Supply Intakes<br />
    164. 164. Water Manufacturing Plants?<br />Water Treatment Plants<br />Wastewater Plants<br />
    165. 165.
    166. 166. Bob Martineau<br />Commissioner of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation<br />
    167. 167. Air Quality: Challenges and Priorities<br />Bob Martineau, Commissioner<br />Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation<br />Power of 10 Regional Summit <br />Nashville, Tennessee<br />May 25, 2011<br />
    168. 168. The Big Picture<br />Air is cleaner in Tennessee than anytime in the last 40 years – since the passage of the Clean Air Act.<br />Grown our economy at the same time air quality has improved.<br />>20% population increase last decade<br />42% increase in VMT 1990-2009<br />EPA plans to make national standards more stringent to protect human health.<br />
    169. 169.
    170. 170.
    171. 171. How to Attain Stricter EPA Ozone Standard?<br />Reducing combustion emissions from: <br />Power Plants & Industry stationary sources<br />Industrial sites employ low-NOx boilers<br />TVA investments in air pollution control devices and retiring older coal-fired plants<br />Vehicles & Transportation Fuels mobile sources (on-road and off-road)<br />Improved fleet and fuel economy<br />Changes in Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT)<br />EPA SmartWay Transportation Partnership<br />Achieving greater energy efficiency<br />
    172. 172. The Power of Ten Regional Summit <br />2008 TDEC emissions inventory data <br />
    173. 173.
    174. 174. Priority Considerations<br />Public awareness and education<br />Cleaner fuels and vehicles<br />Invest in mass transit options and increased public transportation usage<br />Continue reducing emissions from power generation and industrial sites<br />Achieve greater energy efficiency<br />
    175. 175. Questions <br />For more information contact:<br />Bob Martineau, Commissioner<br />Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation<br />401 Church Street<br />L&C Annex, 1st Floor<br />Nashville, TN 37243<br />615-532-0106<br />
    176. 176. Bert Mathews<br />President of The Mathews Company, Chair of Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, and CRT Director<br />
    177. 177. Attract and Retain <br />High-Skilled Talent<br />Alignment of <br />Talent Supply & Demand <br />Workforce Development <br />Business Community <br />Engagement<br />Community Support<br />Legislative Business Agenda / Advocacy<br />Mobility / Transit<br />Regionalism<br />Land-Use and Infrastructure <br />Economic Development Collaboration<br />Partnership 2020 Strategic Drivers<br />Talent Development<br />Economic Diversity<br />Place / Livability<br />Cluster Development <br />and Enhancement<br />Downtown Business Development<br />Sustainability / Environment<br />Corporate Relocation<br />Business Retention & Expansion<br />Asset Development<br />Tourism Support <br />Public Services<br />High Growth Entrepreneurship & Small Business Development<br />International Business<br />Innovation / R & D Capacity<br />
    178. 178. Target Cluster Overview<br />
    179. 179. Susan Whitaker<br />Commissioner of Tennessee Department of TouristDevelopment<br />
    180. 180.
    181. 181. What is Sustainable Tourism? <br />Sustaining theenvironment,culture and heritage of a region while at the same time sustaining the economic growththrough tourism. <br />Cades Cove - Great Smoky Mountains<br />
    182. 182. Why Should We care? <br />Economic Benefits<br /><ul><li>Townies
    183. 183. Tourists
    184. 184. Business </li></ul> Recruitment<br /><ul><li>It’s all inter-related!</li></ul>Tourism is an Economic Engine $14.4 Billion Industry in TN<br />
    185. 185. 2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
    186. 186. 15 Minute Break<br />
    187. 187. 15 Minute Break<br />
    188. 188. Partnership for Sustainable Communities Update<br />
    189. 189. John Schroer<br />Tennessee Department of Transportation Commissioner<br />
    190. 190. Partnership for Sustainable Communities Update<br />US Departments of HUD and EPA <br />Smart Growth America<br />
    191. 191. SalinGeevarghese<br />Geoff Anderson<br />John Frece<br />Director of the Smart Growth Program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency<br />Senior Advisor at HUD, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development<br />President and CEO, Smart Growth America<br />
    192. 192. Call to Action:<br />Middle Tennessee Visioning and the POWER OF TEN Coalition<br />
    193. 193. The Honorable<br />Karl Dean<br />Mayor of Nashville<br />
    194. 194. Awards<br />“Regional Thinking and Action”<br />
    195. 195. 2009 Award Winners<br />
    196. 196. 2010 Award Winners<br />
    197. 197. The Honorable<br />Karl Dean<br />Mayor of Nashville<br />
    198. 198. 2011 Award Winners<br />Jo Ann Graves<br />Chair, Middle Tennessee Mayors Caucus<br />
    199. 199. Jo Ann Graves<br />Elected Unanimously by her Peer Mayors in 2009 as Inaugural Chair of Middle Tennessee Mayors Caucus<br />Mayor Graves and her fellow City and County Mayor Peers have organized effective action on our region’s first key issue of Transportation/Transit<br />Mayor Graves and her Peer City and County Mayors have identified other key issues of regional importance and are organizing to focus attention to collaborative action that will advance our region<br />Mayor Graves is a key member of the Nashville Area MPO Executive Board and serves as the current Chair of the RTA Board of Directors<br />Mayor Graves has been an Leader among Middle Tennessee Mayors in creation, adoption and implementation of the Gallatin On The Move Comprehensive Land Use Plan and the Gallatin Downtown Plan, both models across Tennessee<br />
    200. 200. 2011 Award Winners<br />Susan Taylor<br />Executive Director,  Leadership Middle Tennessee<br />
    201. 201. Susan Taylor<br /> First Executive Director of Leadership Middle Tennessee, our region’s premier leadership program<br />Along with LMT Board, Susan has successfully graduated 300+ Alumni that hold important regional and local leadership  roles<br />Executive Director Taylor, along with LMT Board and Alumni have created a vast regional leadership network of leaders that are key to our region’s communication, collaboration and action leading to our collective success<br />Susan Taylor is loved across the region and in her home community of Rutherford County, her contributions are appreciated far and wide<br />
    202. 202. 2011 Regional Summit<br />“Our Region Grows Together through The POWER OF TEN”<br />
    203. 203. 2011 Summit Co-Hosts<br />
    204. 204. 2011 Summit Sponsors<br />
    205. 205. 2011 Summit Partners<br />

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