Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
ARCHEOLOGY: A METHOD 
OF STUDYING HISTORY
INTRODUCTION 
• Archeology: the study of human history and prehistory 
through excavation and the analysis of artifacts an...
DIG TEAM 
• Members of an archeological dig can include: 
• Field Director: trained and licensed archeologist 
• Superviso...
TYPES OF ARTIFACTS 
• Inorganic remains – remains like stone tools or pottery 
that have been created 
• Marks on tools ca...
CONCLUSIONS FROM FINDINGS 
• Wood – was it from the environment or used by 
humans? Used in buildings or as a tool? 
• Hum...
HOMEWORK 
• Bring in one random item from home. 
• Imagine it is the year 4000 CE and you are an 
archaeologist examining ...
Introduction to Archeology
Introduction to Archeology
Introduction to Archeology
Introduction to Archeology
Introduction to Archeology
Introduction to Archeology
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Introduction to Archeology

1,624 views

Published on

A brief overview of how archaeology contributes to the studying of history.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Introduction to Archeology

  1. 1. ARCHEOLOGY: A METHOD OF STUDYING HISTORY
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION • Archeology: the study of human history and prehistory through excavation and the analysis of artifacts and other remains. • Artifacts found are a primary resource for anthropologists, ethnologists, paleontologists, biologists, and historians. • Archeology is essentially destruction: once a site has been excavated, it can never be reworked. • Accurate and meticulous notes are essential. • A grid is made of the site with all notes painfully recorded in detail.
  3. 3. DIG TEAM • Members of an archeological dig can include: • Field Director: trained and licensed archeologist • Supervisors and crew • Photographers and surveyors • Analyzers: historians, zoologists, botanists, geographers, pathologists (medical)
  4. 4. TYPES OF ARTIFACTS • Inorganic remains – remains like stone tools or pottery that have been created • Marks on tools can give information on what it is used for • Stones used for specified tasks and their quarries • Pottery is the most common of all archeological finds • Style, clay, name of the potter all provide clues • Organic remains – remains of living things (plants and animals) • Best preserved in dry/hot regions, freezing conditions, or in waterlogged areas (peat bogs preserve flesh but not bones because they are acidic)
  5. 5. CONCLUSIONS FROM FINDINGS • Wood – was it from the environment or used by humans? Used in buildings or as a tool? • Human Remains • Age - analyse the teeth for you, bone fusions for adults • Sex – bone structure (pelvis, density) • Disease – deformation of bones (arthritis, tuberculosis, syphilis) • Cause of death – wounds from weapons (swords, holes) • Archeologists are really just detectives or crime scene investigators but of ancient sites
  6. 6. HOMEWORK • Bring in one random item from home. • Imagine it is the year 4000 CE and you are an archaeologist examining these objects. • Hypothesize characteristics of the civilization that left these artifacts behind. • Be prepared to defend your hypotheses with proof to a partner or maybe the class.

×