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The End of Privacy as We Know It?: The Ethics of Privacy on Online Social Networks

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This presentation explores a thesis on the ethics of privacy on online social networks. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the ethical responsibilities of online social networks to protect privacy. Although the social norms of online privacy are in flux, online social networks must employ fair information practices by notifying users when private information is shared. They must give users the opportunity to refuse consent to share information and only use information for its intended purpose. Online social networks have slowly eliminated user control without receiving meaningful user consent to do so, therefore violating the user-service provider relationship. Online social networks have also used choice architecture and design against users to push them in the direction of sharing more information than they would otherwise. By eliminating user control, online social networks have slowly destroyed privacy through unethical means.

*** 2010 Winner of Stanford University's Lyle and Olive Cook Prize for the best Ethics in Society honors thesis ***

To find out more, go to www.cristinajcordova.com or contact Cristina Cordova at www.twitter.com/cristinacordova

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The End of Privacy as We Know It?: The Ethics of Privacy on Online Social Networks

  1. 1. The End of Privacy as We Know It?: The Ethics of Privacy on Online Social Networks<br />Cristina Cordova<br />Ethics in Society Honors Program<br />May 2010<br />
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  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5. Privacy In The News<br />
  6. 6. Why?<br />
  7. 7. Why?<br />
  8. 8. What?<br />I aimed to determine the ethical responsibilities of online social networks to protect privacy. <br />
  9. 9. What?<br />I aimed to determine the ethical responsibilities of online social networks to protect privacy. <br />
  10. 10. What?<br />I aimed to determine the ethical responsibilities of online social networks to protect privacy. <br />
  11. 11. Why Should You Care?<br />It’s your personal information<br />Your information may be shared with third parties (including personally identifiable information)<br />Third parties can keep your information for as long as they want<br />Many users joined when Facebook was private, assuming that Facebook would remain a private network<br />What will be made public next?<br />
  12. 12. Privacy as Control<br />Westin’s definition of “the claim of individuals, groups or institutions to determine for themselves when, how and to what extent information about them is communicated to others”<br />Autonomy<br />Release from Publicity<br />Self-Evaluation and Individual Decision-making<br />Limited and Protected Communication<br />What is privacy exactly?<br />
  13. 13. Privacy as Control<br />What is privacy exactly?<br />
  14. 14. How is privacy on social networks different?<br />Privacy on Email and E-Commerce<br /><ul><li>Perceived Privacy
  15. 15. Trust
  16. 16. User Interface Design
  17. 17. Consequences</li></li></ul><li>Facebook makes it hard for you to understand its policies<br />
  18. 18. Facebook’s Privacy Policy<br /><ul><li> Updated every few months
  19. 19. Read by very few users
  20. 20. Longer than the United States Constitution</li></li></ul><li>Facebook’s Privacy Policy<br />
  21. 21. Facebook opts users in to sharing information in ways they may not want<br />
  22. 22. Default: Opted In<br />October 2009<br />January 2010<br />
  23. 23. Default: Opted In<br />Beacon<br />Instant Personalization<br />
  24. 24. What was Private is now Public<br />
  25. 25. Choice Architecture<br />
  26. 26. Choice Architecture<br />
  27. 27. What does this mean?<br />
  28. 28. Facebook’s privacy settings are too complicated for users<br />
  29. 29. Navigating Privacy Settings<br />
  30. 30. Difficult to Privatize<br />?<br />
  31. 31. Easy to Share<br />
  32. 32. Barriers to User Control<br />
  33. 33. Why?<br />
  34. 34. Why?<br />
  35. 35. Ethical Information Privacy Practices<br />
  36. 36. Ethical Information Privacy Practices<br />
  37. 37. Abuse of Notification and Use<br />Notification<br />Use<br />
  38. 38. Abuse of Choice and Security<br />Choice<br />Security<br />
  39. 39. What Now?<br />
  40. 40. Read my thesis online here: http://scr.bi/fbthesis<br />

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