Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary
427 - 51 St SE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Tel (403) 270-7379
Carol Mason - AFCC Executive Director
Jim Mason - Certified Traditional Horse Culture Trainer
Kari Fulmek – Certified EAL ...
“Unless a child learns
about the forces which
shaped him;
The history of his
people, their values and
customs, their langu...
The Indian child who
learns about his
heritage will be proud
of it.

The lessons he learns
in school, his whole
school exp...


Who are we?



Program Summary



Brief History



In Practice



Hippotherapy



Elk-Dog Therapy



Costs



Ce...
Organizational Mandate:
The Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary (AFCC) is committed
to a holistic and traditional appr...
“Traditional Horse Culture Program” engages Aboriginal youth of
both genders between the ages of 10 to 18, as a means of
h...
What is Horse Therapy?
What is Horse Therapy?
 The goal is directed at intervention in which the horse is an

integral part of self-fulfillment....
What is Animal Therapy?
What is Animal Therapy?
• An animal, such as a dog or horse becomes a basic part of a person’s

day
• Having an animal aro...
What is the Traditional Horse Culture?

Photo curtsey International Traditional Games Society
What is the Traditional Horse Culture?
The efforts of the International Traditional Games Society over a twenty year
perio...
 The exercise is to promote the improvement in human

physical, social, emotional, psychological and/or cognitive behavio...
Aboriginal/European Historical Perspectives
 To explore and understand the traditional heritage of the Aboriginal peoples...
So….Why the Horse?
Why Equine Therapy?
Why Traditional Games?
WHY NOT?
The Elephant in the room
• Anyone have any ideas please?
Canada Suicide Rates
Youth suicide is an urgent issue for First Nations and
Inuit youth in Canada. While there is much var...
Government of Canada - http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/promotion/suicide/index-eng.php
Source: Suicide Prevention Resource Center
 As scientists have discovered, animals

have healing powers. “When you stroke
a cat or pet a dog, you experience a
surge...
• Wikipedia Research states this is a
relatively new field of study
• However - The human-animal
bond has existed for thou...
 Because they can make people

feel safe and loved when they
have been deprived of social
interaction or hurt by other
pe...
 A therapist who brings along

a pet is viewed as being less
dangerous by the patient.
 The previously

uncommunicative ...
 Is the use of horses in

therapy. Hippos is the
Greek word for horse
 Hippotherapy has also

been approved by the
Ameri...
 The concept of therapeutic horseback riding has existed

for over a century
 Became popular after Liz Harwell won the S...
 Hippotherapy is a

physical, occupational, and speechlanguage therapy treatment strategy
that utilizes equine movement a...
 Autism Therapy On Horseback, The Horse Boy, CNN Dr.

Sanjay Gupta Talks With Rupert Isaacson
 Rowan Isaacson – 7 year o...
 World War II
 Corporal William Wynn
 Found in fox hole
 Smoky-Yorkshire Terrier
 Dr. Charles Mayo
 Commanding Offic...
 The dog-day life of the Plains Indians changed dramatically around the early

1700's. When the big, four-footed animals ...
Traditional Horse Culture Class of 2012
Phillip Whiteman Jr. (Cheyenne)
How the Medicine Wheel Model Applies to Horses
 The philosophy uses the medicine wheel as...
Native Americans and the Spiritual Connection to Animals
(Allen and Linda Anderson - Minnesota)
“We're fascinated by the s...
“There is something
about the outside of a
horse
that is good for the
inside of a man”
Winston Churchill

Photo courtesy o...
Certified Horse Culture Trainers
Jim Mason – Cowboy, Retired Police Officer, Horse lover. A keen study and interest in
the...
Train the Trainer - Outline
Level I and II
• History of horse medicine, Tribes of Plains
• How the horse shaped tribal soc...
• “Tyson (the horses name) makes me feel I could trust more and he doesn’t

hurt me”
• “I haven’t been called to the princ...
Quotes from first Horse Clinic (January, 2011)
Lana Crying Head, Blood Tribe: “The most important segment of the clinic wa...
 Animal Therapy provides

 How does it compare to

treatment at low cost
 Is it effective?

clinical counseling?
 Rese...
BUDGET

$63,000

Time frame 6 months - I day a week - 6 hours per day
6 month program

$10,500 per month

40 Students divi...
Equine Assisted Learning – Spirit Equine Connections
www.equineconnection.ca or email: kari@equineconnection.ca
The First ...
• There is nothing like a 1200 pound teacher (self esteem)
• Horses in this program are effective teaching tools;
immediat...
BENEFITS FOR YOUTH
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Improving self-awareness and self-esteem
Developing trust and respect
Pr...
EAL - TESTIMONIALS
"I had fun and I haven't had fun in a while, I can't wait to come back."
"This equine program was so mu...
“It is not enough for a man to know how to ride,
he must know how to fall”

Old Mexican Proverb
Source: Shelley Green, Ph....
Time

Healing takes time and time is healing

Relationship

Healing takes place within the context of a relationship.

Int...
• Youth learn to care and communicate with the horses; through this learning and teachings,
• Learn to care for themselves...
 Animal-Assisted Therapy has been shown to help children

who have experienced abuse or neglect, patients
undergoing chem...
OUR CONCLUSION
The participating youth will sustain overtime the cultural
attachments that they gained in this program, th...
 cmason@afccalgary.org Carol Mason 403 270-7379 x 230
 caroljimmason@msn.com Jim Mason 403.764.48791

 http://www.equin...
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND OR YOU
WANT TO MAKE A DONATION PLEASE CALL
Carol Mason
Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary
#1...


Animal-Assisted Therapy and Activities: A Study and Research Resource Guide for the Use of Companion
Animals in Animal-...
Afcc horse culture program
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Marginalized youth, or youth stressed by disaster major events, are often alone, without hope, and unreachable. Animal therapy, in this case using horses, has been proven to be a way of reaching this youth before then can do harm to themselves or others.

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  • Animals are tools for therapy because they can make people feel safe and loved when they have been deprived of social interaction or hurt by other people. They do not communicate with words, and so patients afraid of approaching people can comfortably approach an animal.
  • Additionally, a therapist who brings along a pet is viewed as being less dangerous by the patient, and so the previously uncommunicative patient is willing to share more with the professional [2]. Animals commonly used for therapy include dogs, cats, horses, birds, rabbits, and other small animals.
  • Hippotherapy is the use of horses in therapy. Hippos is the Greek word for horses, and this type of therapy has been effective in treating people with a wide spectrum of problems: physical, behavioral, social, cognitive, and psychological. Patients may have cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, multiple sclerosis, depression, mental retardation, or spina bifida. Hippotherapy has also been approved by the American Speech and Hearing Association as a treatment method for individuals with speech disorders [8].
  • When William Wynn was injuredhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoky_(dog)#First_therapy_dog
  • Today, hippotherapy programs exist in at least 24 countries. [8] 
  • Horses and humans have an long history of interacting in ways that benefit both—but particularly the humans. For horse lovers, there is something about the inside of a barn, the smell of the animals, and the work that goes along with horses that is healing and positive. Source: Shelley Green, Ph.D., Professor of Family Therapy Olivia Schlapfer, M.S.,Family Therapy Doctoral Student, Nova Southeastern University presentation.
  • Principles involve the application of values to the way things are done.Consistency with a set of traditional healing principles constitutes culture-based evidence of effectivenessThis set of healing principles was developed with a group of traditional healers by Dr Mehl-Madrona, an American Indian at the U of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, These principles were developed using established research procedure and were published in academic journals—therefore, they have a high degree of credibilityMehl-Madrona L. Traditional (Native American) Indian Medicine. Treatment of Chronic Illness: Development of an Integrated Program with Conventional American Medicine and Evaluation of Effectiveness. http://www.healing-arts.org/mehl-madrona/mmtraditionalpaper.htmMehl-Madrona L. (1998). Coyote Medicine: Lessons from Native American Healing. Touchstone.
  • A list of possible areas in which a Tribal Practice might have outcomes is listed in the Form. Information in these categories is very powerful evidence for the effectiveness of a Tribal Practice.  For any applicable outcome category, describe what changes the Tribal Practice will achieve, e.g., Social/Community/Cultural Connectedness might include specifically, increased knowledge of cultural songs and prayers; identification of participants with their culture; involvement in cultural events (e.g., Powwows).  Some of these outcome categories are recognized in the National Outcome Measures System (NOMS) in which AMD is required to participate in order to receive federal funding National Outcome Measures (NOMs). http://www.nationaloutcomemeasures.samhsa.gov/PDF/NOMS/revised_grid_4_1_08.pdf(Source: Lewis Mehl-Madrona, M.D., Ph.D. Traditional (Native American) Indian MedicineTreatment of Chronic Illness: Development of an Integrated Program with Conventional American Medicine and Evaluation of Effectiveness. http://www.healing-arts.org/mehl-madrona/mmtraditionalpaper.htm )
  • Afcc horse culture program

    1. 1. Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary 427 - 51 St SE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Tel (403) 270-7379
    2. 2. Carol Mason - AFCC Executive Director Jim Mason - Certified Traditional Horse Culture Trainer Kari Fulmek – Certified EAL Trainer Chris Hylton, AFCC Board Member, also has Canada wide EAP
    3. 3. “Unless a child learns about the forces which shaped him; The history of his people, their values and customs, their language, he will never really know himself or his potential as a human being. Indian culture and values have a unique place in the history of mankind.
    4. 4. The Indian child who learns about his heritage will be proud of it. The lessons he learns in school, his whole school experience, should reinforce and contribute to the image he has of himself as an Indian.” George Manuel - 1972
    5. 5.  Who are we?  Program Summary  Brief History  In Practice  Hippotherapy  Elk-Dog Therapy  Costs  Certifications  Research  Fundamental Concerns  Conclusion
    6. 6. Organizational Mandate: The Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary (AFCC) is committed to a holistic and traditional approach in the development and provision of services and resources for the Aboriginal peoples of Calgary. We are dedicated to serve as an ethical, community minded organization, respectful of Aboriginal Cultures and Teachings for the benefit of all Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples.
    7. 7. “Traditional Horse Culture Program” engages Aboriginal youth of both genders between the ages of 10 to 18, as a means of helping them develop positive communication skills, appreciation of self and life, build self-esteem and empower them to stay in or return to school. The youth are engaged with the Horse, Equine Therapists, Horse Trainers and Elders who guide them through the traditional teachings, stories, medicines and other traditional ways so that they may develop positive life skills.
    8. 8. What is Horse Therapy?
    9. 9. What is Horse Therapy?  The goal is directed at intervention in which the horse is an integral part of self-fulfillment.  Animal Therapy is a therapy that uses animals to help heal children and adults. Animal therapy is not bias, a wide range of animals are used in animal therapy dogs, cats, birds, elephants, dolphins, rabbits are some popular animals that are used.  Animal therapy or pet therapy as it is sometimes called is most commonly used to help people heal emotionally, physically and mentally. Source: http://www.worldwidehealth.com/
    10. 10. What is Animal Therapy?
    11. 11. What is Animal Therapy? • An animal, such as a dog or horse becomes a basic part of a person’s day • Having an animal around reduces stress, creates a relationship, helps people feel loved and needed, provides a listening ear without judgment and it can improve social skills and boost the confidence of an individual. Also referred to as: • (ET) Equine Therapy • (HT) Hippo therapy (Greek word meaning “Horse”) • Ponokamita Therapy (Elk-Dog) - Blackfoot word for horse • AAT-Animal-Assisted Therapy • Pet Therapy-informal/generic • AAA-Animal-Assisted Activities Source: http://www.worldwidehealth.com/
    12. 12. What is the Traditional Horse Culture? Photo curtsey International Traditional Games Society
    13. 13. What is the Traditional Horse Culture? The efforts of the International Traditional Games Society over a twenty year period resurrected the tribal cultural games. Knowing that the ancient games were for the youngest to the oldest in each tribe as a means to promote the cultural values, native language, and well-being of the families. Over twenty-five American Indian games including the Horse Culture Series have been revived for their active preservation in native cultural activities at schools and at ceremonial events. The Traditional Games Society has not only brought together families from dozens of American Indian tribes, but also visitors from Korea, Japan, Scotland, Australia, Canada, and U.S. states from California to New York, to participate in the traditional games of North American Indians. For more information call DeeAnna Leader at (406) 226-9141 or e-mail your questions to games@traditionalnativegames.org - Head office: East Glacier, MT
    14. 14.  The exercise is to promote the improvement in human physical, social, emotional, psychological and/or cognitive behaviour.  To gain a healthier understanding, increase in self-understanding through emotional growth and self discipline.  To develop skills in self-awareness, self-responsibility, non-verbal communication, self-control, self respect and most importantly selfconfidence.  “SUICIDE PREVENTION” is the Main Objective. (This however, is not readily conveyed to the students)  The Traditional Games is an exercise of fun and games, to stimulate active play. But most importantly to maintain Native American Traditions.
    15. 15. Aboriginal/European Historical Perspectives  To explore and understand the traditional heritage of the Aboriginal peoples.  To provide Cultural Reconnection programs in: tradition, language, spirituality, and family values. Residential School Syndrome  Primary focus is placed on the impact of residential schools to all Aboriginal People.  Address the history of residential school (boarding school) trauma, the generational affects within Aboriginal communities. Dynamics of Grief and Loss  Explore the loss and consequential grief. To gain knowledge of these issues in the Family Reconstruction settings; to establish continuation of healing and recovery from the trauma of residential school survivors; and the healing of generations yet to come. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder  To identify and develop programs and tools to help participants recognize and assess post traumatic stress disorder; and to understand its relationship to residential school survivors. Cultural Systems – Values & Beliefs  To provide participants with knowledge and skills in the identification and exploration of cultural ramifications; to provide an opportunity for participants to enhance their effectiveness by addressing systemic and personal issues of living in a culturally diverse atmosphere. “It’s time to open the doors to healing”
    16. 16. So….Why the Horse? Why Equine Therapy? Why Traditional Games?
    17. 17. WHY NOT?
    18. 18. The Elephant in the room • Anyone have any ideas please?
    19. 19. Canada Suicide Rates Youth suicide is an urgent issue for First Nations and Inuit youth in Canada. While there is much variation among communities, overall rates are high. Suicide rates are five to seven times higher for First Nations youth than for non-Aboriginal youth. Suicide rates among Inuit youth are among the highest in the world, at 11 times the national average. Government of Canada - http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/promotion/suicide/indexeng.php
    20. 20. Government of Canada - http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/promotion/suicide/index-eng.php
    21. 21. Source: Suicide Prevention Resource Center
    22. 22.  As scientists have discovered, animals have healing powers. “When you stroke a cat or pet a dog, you experience a surge of healing hormones and chemicals that produce feelings of peace and serenity.” Edward T. Creagan, M.D. - Mayo Clinic oncologist AFCC HCP Photos
    23. 23. • Wikipedia Research states this is a relatively new field of study • However - The human-animal bond has existed for thousands of years. • AAT is a type of therapy that involves animals as a form of treatment. • The goal of AFCC is to improve the social, emotional, or cognitive functioning for Aboriginal youth • Animals can also be useful for educational and motivational effectiveness for participants AFCC HCP Photos
    24. 24.  Because they can make people feel safe and loved when they have been deprived of social interaction or hurt by other people. “ANIMALS DO NOT LIE OR JUDGE” (Jim Mason)  They do not communicate with words, and so patients afraid of approaching people can comfortably approach an animal.  When animals are given respect and trust by their student/companion, animals will give back respect and trust.  The simple physical actions of Jim Mason, Horse Culture Trainer AFCC HCP Photos stroking/petting, and talking to the animals is calming in a “non threatening/non pressure” environment.
    25. 25.  A therapist who brings along a pet is viewed as being less dangerous by the patient.  The previously uncommunicative patient is willing to share more with the professional.  Animals commonly used for therapy include dogs, cats, horses, birds, rabb its, and other small animals. Kari Fulmek, Equine Assisted Learning Trainer AFCC HCP Photos
    26. 26.  Is the use of horses in therapy. Hippos is the Greek word for horse  Hippotherapy has also been approved by the American Speech and Hearing Association as a treatment method for individuals with speech disorders Picture: http://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/wpcontent/uploads/2009/07/trojan-horse.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animalassisted_therapy#Equine_therapy
    27. 27.  The concept of therapeutic horseback riding has existed for over a century  Became popular after Liz Harwell won the Silver Medal in dressage at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, as she was nearly paralyzed from waist down from polio. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal-assisted_therapy#Equine_therapy
    28. 28.  Hippotherapy is a physical, occupational, and speechlanguage therapy treatment strategy that utilizes equine movement as part of an integrated intervention program to achieve functional outcomes  Pelvic rhythmic and repetitive movement  No actual hippotherapists  Trained “therapy professionals” evaluate appropriateness of hippotherapy on individual basis  Therapy professionals work closely with horse handler  Manipulate aspects of horse’s movement to promote favorable outcomes pertaining to a particular therapy "Source: Animal Therapies and Autism presentation, Dr Matt Colligan & American Hippotherapy Association."
    29. 29.  Autism Therapy On Horseback, The Horse Boy, CNN Dr. Sanjay Gupta Talks With Rupert Isaacson  Rowan Isaacson – 7 year old boy with autism You tube video http://youtu.be/b7GHzselNmA
    30. 30.  World War II  Corporal William Wynn  Found in fox hole  Smoky-Yorkshire Terrier  Dr. Charles Mayo  Commanding Officer of Hospital in New Guinea  Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN  Used Smoky for 12 years as therapy dog Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoky_(dog)#First_therapy_dog
    31. 31.  The dog-day life of the Plains Indians changed dramatically around the early 1700's. When the big, four-footed animals came to the tribes, the way of life changed quickly and dramatically as Elk Dog "ponokamita" was adopted into tribal cultures.  Integrating the horse into native way of life included deep understanding of the animal, the habitat and behaviour. The horse rapidly became important to securing food, transportation and territory. Games that were played during dogdays transitioned onto horse back. For example: Foot and Horse Race, Hoop and Staff, Horse and Hide and many other games became popular with all plains tribes. The respect for the horse grew and there became Horse dances, Medicine Bundles, and Ceremonies were adopted to honor this new relative. http://www.traditionalnativegames.org/horse_culture_86.html  The Medicine Wheel Model is a guide to help us find balance in our lives and to understand how our actions affect everything around us: horses, humans and all living things. Source: http://www.medicinewheelmodel.com/cms/index.php?page=Medicine-Wheel-Model
    32. 32. Traditional Horse Culture Class of 2012
    33. 33. Phillip Whiteman Jr. (Cheyenne) How the Medicine Wheel Model Applies to Horses  The philosophy uses the medicine wheel as a model to work with the horse: the four colors, the four directions, stages of life and behaviors that come with each stage. “Horses too have four sides, the child, adolescent, adult and grandparent side, they mirror us as humans and our behaviors.”  This is just some of the philosophy: This simple, practical approach will benefit any level of horsemanship from the novice to the master horse trainer, or will benefit those that don't even own a horse. Research has proven that horses help people; with disabilities, and emotional problems or just young people that are misunderstood.  http://www.medicinewheelmodel.com/cms/index.php?page=native-horsemanship
    34. 34. Native Americans and the Spiritual Connection to Animals (Allen and Linda Anderson - Minnesota) “We're fascinated by the spiritual perspective Native Americans teach in their culture. Native American spirituality offers the belief that everything is sacred. This means that we're connected to each other with invisible golden threads. To express gratitude for the sacredness in all creation, Native Americans give thanks to animals, who give their lives to be food or clothing, and to the clouds for the water they bring. .......who remind us how spiritually connected we are to each other and all forms of life. When we take time to notice the subtle messages animals deliver, we may find the depth of our connections to be absolutely astounding.” Source: http://www.angelanimals.net/articles025.html
    35. 35. “There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man” Winston Churchill Photo courtesy of International Traditional Games Society 37
    36. 36. Certified Horse Culture Trainers Jim Mason – Cowboy, Retired Police Officer, Horse lover. A keen study and interest in the traditions of the Blackfeet tribes. AFCC volunteer instructor for the traditional games in Calgary, AB. Jim works with the Aboriginal Youth in fine tuning their riding abilities and instructs on how the games of the Plains Indians played. Dutch Lunik – (Blackfeet) Movie Stunt Specialist, most recent movie contract completed and released in theatres early fall “Cowboys & Aliens,” providing Native horses and riders for some very exciting scenes. Instructor for traditional horse games. Benita Plain Feather - (Fort Belknap) ITGS President, Instrumental in research, restoring, recording and reviving old traditional horse games of the North American Plains Indian. Craig Falcon - (Blackfeet) Educator and historian on horse culture history, ceremonies, and residential school trauma instructs on the modern Indian horse culture. DeeAnna Leader – Executive Director of ITGS, 20 year passion of keeping the traditions of Blackfeet Indian traditional games. Educator, teacher has published her books on the stories and the games of the Blackfeet Traditional Games.
    37. 37. Train the Trainer - Outline Level I and II • History of horse medicine, Tribes of Plains • How the horse shaped tribal socio-economic foundation • The horse and women & children • Herbal remedies for horse care • Beginning research and recovery of meaningful tribal horse culture Level III Training • Mock classroom teaching by participants • Mock arena teaching • Advanced research techniques • Advanced elder research and preservation (consideration for what is passed on and what is kept within tribal/personal knowledge) • How to implement programs into the schools, juvenile programs, courts, family services, Alcohol/Drug programs, Suicide prevention programs, and other Aboriginal agencies.
    38. 38. • “Tyson (the horses name) makes me feel I could trust more and he doesn’t hurt me” • “I haven’t been called to the principles office for 3 weeks and I am more relaxed in class” • “I accomplished lots of things through team work” • “Next time I work alone with “Diesel”! Other than that it was a good day” • “My horse trusted me, he was good and I trusted him” • “My horse was so nice and he listened to me” • “I learned control and I’m not scared anymore”
    39. 39. Quotes from first Horse Clinic (January, 2011) Lana Crying Head, Blood Tribe: “The most important segment of the clinic was the aspects of what we lost (relationship with horse) and how we as individuals can gain it back for our homes and communities.” Karyn Gagnon, Metis: “The clinic provided me with a comfortable pace for learning and for allowing the horses as well as the trainers to teach us. It was a good balance between knowledge and practical.” Charlane Starlight, Nakoda Stoney Nation: “To me, the camaraderie that developed among the participants was important.” Jim Mason, Calgary: “Understanding the healing power of the horse and the way the horse brought people together then and now. The horse was friend and relative.” Lawrence Gaudry, Metis: “Learning the horse culture history (early, middle, and modern North American Plains Indians).”
    40. 40.  Animal Therapy provides  How does it compare to treatment at low cost  Is it effective? clinical counseling?  Research is required
    41. 41. BUDGET $63,000 Time frame 6 months - I day a week - 6 hours per day 6 month program $10,500 per month 40 Students divide into $10,500 per month $262.50 per child 4 classes per month divide into $262.50 $65.63 per hr – 40 students 5 hr classes divide into $65.63 $13.12 per hr Man and Horse Power 2 Coordinators, 4 Instructors, 2 ranch hands 60 horses – tack, saddles, saddle blankets 1 indoor horse facility A lot of will power
    42. 42. Equine Assisted Learning – Spirit Equine Connections www.equineconnection.ca or email: kari@equineconnection.ca The First Nationally Recognized Certified Equine Assisted Learning, Building Block Program The Spiritual Equine Connection follows the Cartier Equine-Assisted Learning Centre's BuildingBlock™ teaching format. Interactive programs Each exercise is custom designed to maximize the progressive learning potential and focus on developing individual skills as they work through each interactive group challenge. Teams will work to: develop relationships; accept responsibility and accountability; overcome barriers to find change; be encouraged to be creative and innovative; find opportunity in working together; realize the benefits associated with effective communication; and recognize the value of mutual trust, respect, and personal integrity. Behaviour is the result of a dialogue between your brain and your experience powerful individual journey of learning
    43. 43. • There is nothing like a 1200 pound teacher (self esteem) • Horses in this program are effective teaching tools; immediately responding to what participants do. • Facilitators, like myself, are trained to look for "teachable moments" that horses identify. • Instilling a sense of leadership in young people learn to develop a personal sense of responsibility through the care and attention that a horse requires. • Responsibility is one of the key attributes of leadership and having to care for a horse and be immersed in its continuing care has proven to be a powerful tool that is used to teach responsibility. • Learn to communicate effectively. • Working with horses in an equine assisted program gives young people the chance to learn how to become effective communicators and listeners. This is an important part of developing leadership skills in children of all ages. Being able to listen to what your horse is telling you without resorting to frustration is a vital skill.
    44. 44. BENEFITS FOR YOUTH • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Improving self-awareness and self-esteem Developing trust and respect Providing training in social skills Encouraging sensory stimulation and integration Developing choice-making and goal-setting skills Encouraging responsibility Promoting pro-social attitudes through care-giving experiences Considering the needs and views of others Sharing responsibility for social and physical environments Communication skills Leadership skills Emotional, physical, mental, and spiritual wellness Playfulness Creativity Laughter
    45. 45. EAL - TESTIMONIALS "I had fun and I haven't had fun in a while, I can't wait to come back." "This equine program was so much fun! I've never had this experience before and I feel I'm so confident. I loved being here so much. Hope you guys keep this going so everyone can have an awesome experience like this!" "Today I've been stressed out and upset. But when I came here everything changed about how I felt, because I was building a relationship with Tanya Tucker." "Today Pepper could tell I was sad, and he was also unhappy. I feel he wouldn't move until I smartened up and started being happy."
    46. 46. “It is not enough for a man to know how to ride, he must know how to fall” Old Mexican Proverb Source: Shelley Green, Ph.D., Professor of Family Therapy Olivia Schlapfer, M.S.,Family Therapy Doctoral Student, Nova Southeastern University presentation.
    47. 47. Time Healing takes time and time is healing Relationship Healing takes place within the context of a relationship. Intensity Achieving an energy of activation is necessary Holism Mental/emotional/physical Peace and Quiet The distractions of modern life "inactivate" catalysts for change Self-awareness Self-reflection needed for healing Rest Change often requires a break in usual daily rhythms. Ceremony To access spiritual aid to healing Source: Lewis Mehl-Madrona, M.D., Ph.D . Traditional (Native American) Indian Medicine Treatment of Chronic Illness: Development of an Integrated Program with Conventional American Medicine and Evaluation of Effectiveness. http://www.healing-arts.org/mehl-madrona/mmtraditionalpaper.htm )
    48. 48. • Youth learn to care and communicate with the horses; through this learning and teachings, • Learn to care for themselves and build healthy communication patterns and relationships with others • Enhance their cultural connection and sense of belonging that will in turn develop leadership skills, self respect, and a positive outlook towards the future with the help of peers, horses and nature. • Develop a strong sense of identity and self-worth; they strengthen their sense of belonging and are supported by the Elders; they begin to develop life skills and resilience. • To experience nature and the healing power of horses, engage in activities and experiences designed • Guide and inspire the youths to learn personal integrity and make positive changes to take with them for the rest of their lives. • Return as mentors and begin to develop leadership skills. • Discover and chart a path for themselves. • Become positive role models for other youth and advocate for themselves and other at-risk youth. • Become aware of suicide prevention and the cycle of life. • Develop a strong awareness for the value of life, recognize the signs and symptoms of suicide, and learn ways to prevent it through various techniques.
    49. 49.  Animal-Assisted Therapy has been shown to help children who have experienced abuse or neglect, patients undergoing chemotherapy or other difficult medical treatments, and veterans and their families who are struggling to cope with the effects of wartime military service. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal-assisted_therapy#Equine_therapy
    50. 50. OUR CONCLUSION The participating youth will sustain overtime the cultural attachments that they gained in this program, through continuous and ongoing practices of traditional ways and ceremonies, attachment to the Elders and mutual support. Our children need help and only we can find the solution to our success.
    51. 51.  cmason@afccalgary.org Carol Mason 403 270-7379 x 230  caroljimmason@msn.com Jim Mason 403.764.48791  http://www.equineconnection.ca Kari Fulmek 403-519-6765  chris@hylton.ca Chris Hylton 1 800 449 5866
    52. 52. FOR MORE INFORMATION AND OR YOU WANT TO MAKE A DONATION PLEASE CALL Carol Mason Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary #101, 427-51st Avenue Calgary, AB Canada T2H 0M8 403.270.7379 x 270 www.afccalgary.org Email:info@afccalgary.org
    53. 53.  Animal-Assisted Therapy and Activities: A Study and Research Resource Guide for the Use of Companion Animals in Animal-Assisted Interventions , by Phil Arkow , (2011: 189 pp.), ISBN: 978-0-615-46239-4  Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association, Inc. (2009). http://www.eagala.org/  Dolphin Therapy. http://www.dolphintherapy.eu  Animal-Assisted Therapy. (2010). http://www.mahalo.com/animal-assisted-therapy  Miscellaneous Therapies: Pet-facilitated Therapy. In The Complete Guide to Autism Treatments, Freeman, S. K., Ph.D (pp. 327-333). Lynden, WA: SKF Books USA, Inc.  Dolphin Therapy and Autism. http://www.researchautism.net/autism_treatments_therapies_intervention.ikml?ra=64&infolevel=2  Life Changing Stories: The American Hippotherapy Association. http://www.americanhippotherapyassociation.org/stories/life-changing-stories-2/  A n i m a l - A s s i s t e d A c t i v i t i e s ( A A A ) http://www.deltasociety.org/Document.Doc?id=10  Animal Therapies and Autism, Dr. Matt Coldwell, http://www.slidefinder.net/2/20553_20Animal_20Therapies/23601139  www.medicinewheelmodel.com/cms/index.php?page=Medicine-Wheel-Model  Traditional Horse Culture – International Traditional Games – www.traditionalnativegames.org  Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary – www.afccalgary.org

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