Teaching EFL to children:a strong and colourful tapestry.   Cristina Helena Evelyn Tinoco Teixeira                       M...
t in g                 the       set                     teache   the                                r                    ...
How do children think and learn?                                   3
Primary Education        Piaget’s Theory (1967)                                                          Vygotsky (1962)...
How have these theories influencedteachers in primary classroom?• Communicate meaningfully• Use purposeful contexts• Work ...
Second/Foreign Language Halliday (1993) states that when children learn language, they are not simply engaging in one     ...
Second/Foreign Languagemother   Meaning Making     Genre-tongue                      based                           mater...
Task-based Teachinga task is a workplan      learners process language                                pragmatically       ...
CBI - Content-Based Instruction (USA)  CLIL- Content and Language Integrated             Learning (Europe)an overlap betwe...
Genre-based PedagogyGenres are not Bakhtin (1992), we modal our conversations in the   According to just forms. Genres of ...
Genre-based Pedagogy                       11
School Genres                12
Second/Foreign Languagemother   Meaning Making      Genre-tongue                       based                            ma...
Whole Language (reading, writing,skills                       Whole Language Language listening,                       Who...
Whole Language in the English class                                      15
One looks back with appreciation to the            brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched           o...
References:•Bakhtin, M. M. (1986) Speech Genres and Other Late Essays.Trans. by Vern W. McGee. Austin, Tx: University of T...
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Teaching efl to children final

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Teaching efl to children final

  1. 1. Teaching EFL to children:a strong and colourful tapestry. Cristina Helena Evelyn Tinoco Teixeira MA Language Arts Pos-grad English Language (PUC-Rio) BA Fine Arts (UFRJ) CNPq Multimodality Researcher Fundamental 1 - EFL teacher (Colégio A.Liessin)
  2. 2. t in g the set teache the r thea strong and colourful tapestry. students get the tar ge mother the gua lan tongue 2
  3. 3. How do children think and learn? 3
  4. 4. Primary Education Piaget’s Theory (1967)  Vygotsky (1962) All children pass through stages:  Language sensori-motor (til 18 months)  operational (til 11 years approximately) formal operations (11 years onwards). Beginning serves a regulative, Donaldson (1978):rs ccu g o communicative function Le can n ldren before they arniperceive, reason and understand inen chi rational terms Children do not pass through stages. Later transforms the way children wh mature, tand erswith the tasks that undactions and operations think, learn and understandActions  Mental It was the unfamiliarity led essage s higher mental processes  mformative effects on the to failure ursLanguage  no occevaluate, abilityngplan, earni handrreason to structure of thinking L memorise ild en c Bruner (1966) when stand r unde ges   instruction = the heart of human development a rsMature-thinking importance of action and intelligence = mess to learn through capacity Learn ng occu iproblem-solving instruction en n hildr  wh e Concrete problems c manipulation of ZPD – zone of proximal development abstractstand der unprocedures  es messag distance between actual development level and Language potencial development under guidance and  collaboration Learning  social interaction – LASS 4 Language Acquisiton Support System
  5. 5. How have these theories influencedteachers in primary classroom?• Communicate meaningfully• Use purposeful contexts• Work on tasks• Use variety of forms• Read literature Respond to it critically Use reading for learning• Appreciate mistakes• Offer endless help 5
  6. 6. Second/Foreign Language Halliday (1993) states that when children learn language, they are not simply engaging in one Hence the ontogenesis type of learning among many; rather, they are learning theoccurs in mainly one way Learning foundations of learning itself. (rooting/growing/development) - when children understand messages -The distinctive characteristic of human learning of language is at the same time the is that it is a process of making meaning - a claiming that comprehension and semiotic process; and of learning. thing. ontogenesis the prototypical form learning are very much the same (basis) of human semiotic is language. 6
  7. 7. Second/Foreign Languagemother Meaning Making Genre-tongue based materialsimages content-sounds based materialsrealia task-basedgames materials body language topic related input 7
  8. 8. Task-based Teachinga task is a workplan learners process language pragmatically A task is intended to result in language use - language used in the real world - 8
  9. 9. CBI - Content-Based Instruction (USA) CLIL- Content and Language Integrated Learning (Europe)an overlap between the second/foreign language and content subjects a teaching method that emphasizeslearning about something rather than learning about language 9
  10. 10. Genre-based PedagogyGenres are not Bakhtin (1992), we modal our conversations in the According to just forms. Genres of discursive genre that are passed on to us as is our forms are forms of life, ways of being. They which we dominate much before we are mother tongue, and areframes for to any formal teaching of grammar. For Bakhtin, exposed social action ...Genres shape the thoughts its lexical composition and grammatical “Our mother tongue – structure – is not learnt in dictionaries and in grammar books, we we form and the acquire it in face of concrete utterance we hear and reproducecommunications by whichweduring real oral communication with the individuals who surround interact. Genres are the us. We assimilate the language forms only in the forms taken by familiar places we go to the enunciation and it is exactly with these forms (…) the create intelligible discourse genre enters our experience and our consciousness incommunicative action with such a way their delicate correlation isn’t broken. To learn to each other and the speak is to learn how to structure enunciations (because we guideposts we use to speak through enunciations, not through isolated sentences, and explore the familiar. least even, obviously, through isolated words). (p. 301 – 302) (Swales1997: 19) 10
  11. 11. Genre-based Pedagogy 11
  12. 12. School Genres 12
  13. 13. Second/Foreign Languagemother Meaning Making Genre-tongue based materialsimages in e content- gu agsounds an L based realia hol e L /ES materials W E FL task-basedgames materials body language topic related input 13
  14. 14. Whole Language (reading, writing,skills Whole Language Language listening, Whole Language meaning-centered Learning is a in many ways,tomirrors the speaking, thinking) in in many part mirrors the in many to ways, mirrors many ways, mirrors the whole ways, whole collaborative should be dealt with in Natural Approach teaching Terrel) Natural Approach (Krashen and its whole – not isolated Task-based (Krashen and Terrel) CBI/CLIL instruction instruction Genre-based pedagogy activity (which mirrors Vygotsky’s ZPD theory) ---itshares the belief that –– itit shares the belief that – - shares the belief that – it shares the belief that -it shares the belief communication of you that –isto Language is Languagelearn when meaning butnot an end in students should end indo it, you is not an be exposed itself, a Teachers When communication is successful itself, but a Whole Language facilitate the the necessary point ofend it. youmeansas you departure learn to an do authentic material.learning process the input a bit beyond the current (with successful language activity means to an for end. level of competence), Children should be new learning takes place. Students should immersed in So, they should learn learn by doing - literacy events to read by reading and as active– with authentic prints. learn to write by engagement reading and writing produces results. - I do, I understand - 14
  15. 15. Whole Language in the English class 15
  16. 16. One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for thegrowing plant and for the soul of the child. Carl Jung teching EFL to kids 16 16
  17. 17. References:•Bakhtin, M. M. (1986) Speech Genres and Other Late Essays.Trans. by Vern W. McGee. Austin, Tx: University of Texas Press.•Brinton, D. M., Snow, M. A., & Wesche, M. B. (1989). Content-based second language instruction. New York: Newbury House.•Goodman, Y. M. "Roots of the Whole-Language Movement". TheElementary School Journal, (90):2117•Halliday M.A.K. (1975). Learning how to mean, London, EdwardArnold•Krashen, S.D; Terrell, T.D. (1983). The Natural Approach. NewYork: Pergamon.•Nunan, D (2004) Task-Based Language Teaching. CambridgeUniversity Press•Patzeit, K. E. Principles of Whole Language and Implications forESL Learners. http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED400526.pdf•Piaget, J. (1952) The Origins of Intelligence in Children. New York:International University Press.•Wertsch, J. V. (1985). Vygotsky and the social formation of mind..Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.•THANK YOU YOUTUBE!!!

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