Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Newsletter 2

Newsletter 2

  • Login to see the comments

Newsletter 2

  1. 1. CReW Project The CReW project The Cultural Relations at Work (CReW) project is financed by the Erasmus+ Programme, Jean Monnet Activities (EAC-A03-2016). The project is coordinated by the University of Siena in partnership with EUNIC Global. The CReW project consists of three events and a final conference. The first two events took place in Morocco (Rabat - February 2018) and the United Kingdom (London, October 2018), while the last one is set to take place in Germany (Stuttgart – April 25 and 26, 2019). The final conference will be in Italy (Siena – Summer 2019) in the framework of the Siena Cultural Relations Forum and will gather selected attendees and speakers from the previous events. Each event focuses on one of the three work streams of the joint communication, “Towards a EU strategy for international cultural relations” (JOIN (2016) 29 final): (1) supporting culture as an engine for sustainable social and economic development (Morocco), (2) reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage (UK), and (3) promoting culture and inter-cultural dialogue for peaceful inter-community relations (Germany). Participants are selected among local and non-local practitioners, policy-makers and academics. Newsletter 1 Newsletter n.2
  2. 2. CReW Project The project has four main goals: • foster dialogue between the academic world and policy-makers; • cross-fertilize the academic work with recent practices and inform these with the results of the academic research; • improve the quality of professional training for practitioners and policymakers on international cultural relations; and • facilitate better access to content and methodologies that might be relevant for a wider audience of academics, policy-makers and practitioners in cultural relations and cultural diplomacy. The events encourage a combination of practice and theory and are focused on the analysis of specific case studies. This methodological approach has two goals in mind: (1) make the practical knowledge and theories often used in cultural relations more explicit and create a common language for practitioners and policymakers and (2) collect and organize relevant information from the case studies in ways that are applicable and grounded in theoretical social frameworks. The CReW project aims to bridge the gap between what researchers do in academia and what cultural diplomats, policy-makers, and practitioners do in their day-to-day work.
 Newsletter 2
  3. 3. CReW Project The London event: Reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage in the EU Neighborhood South On October 22 and 23, 2018, the British Council at the Royal Society hosted the second CReW event in London (United Kingdom). Coinciding with the European Year of Cultural Heritage (EYCH), the conference took place at the perfect time, as the European Commission proposed a New European Agenda for Culture‑ on May 22, 2018. The New Agenda provided the framework for the next phase of1 cooperation at the EU-level ‑ , which started at the beginning of 2019.2 The Agenda has three strategic objectives, with social, economic and external dimensions‑ . The core3 of the external dimension rests on strengthening international cultural relations, whose third workstream, reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage, was at the centre of the CReW Conference. Moreover, while most actions in the New Agenda contribute primarily to one of the three objectives, protecting and valorising cultural heritage is a cross-cutting area of policy actions at EU-level. The Commission’s engagement on cultural heritage resulted in recommendations, principles and toolkits to ensure the positive legacy of the Year and contribute to the New Agenda.‑ . In particular, at the4 conclusion of the EYCH, the European Commission has released a European Framework for Action on Cultural Heritage that “reflects the common set-up for heritage-related activities at European level, primarily in EU policies and programmes” and “proposes around 60 actions be implemented by A new European Agenda for Culture, COM (2018) 267 final. https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/1 PDF/?uri=CELEX:52018DC0267&from=EN https://ec.europa.eu/culture/policy/strategic-framework_en2 A new European Agenda for Culture, COM (2018) 267 final, p. 2.3 Ibidem, p. 84 Newsletter 3
  4. 4. CReW Project the European Commission in 2019 and 2020”. ‑ These actions seek to promote and protect Europe’s5 cultural heritage. Taking advantage of such a prolific moment, our attendees —-both local and non-local cultural diplomats, practitioners, and academics—worked on the third work stream of the joint communication, “Towards a EU strategy for international cultural relations” (JOIN (2016) 29 final): reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage. In doing so, they devoted special attention to the development of the Action Plan and its implications for the implementation of the EU Strategy, keeping an eye on the EU Neighborhood South. Session 1. Cases “from the field” The first session provided a detailed overview of various experiences and their impact on reinforcing the protection and valorization of tangible and intangible cultural heritage in the EU and its third- party partners. Mr. Alexis Mocio-Mathieu, French Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs: French Government Initiatives to Protect Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage Abroad. Kate Pugh (Chair Cultural Protection Fund Advisory Group) and Alex Bishop (Grants Manager Cultural Protection Fund) described the UK Cultural Protection Fund’s (CPF) activities, which is a partnership between the British Council and the Department for Culture, Media, and Sport (DCMS). The objective of the CPF is to safeguard and restore tangible and intangible cultural heritage affected by conflict in the wider MENA region by supporting projects responding to locally identified development needs, with the involvement of global grantees and local partners. Alexis Mocio-Mathieu from the French Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs entertained participants with insight into French government initiatives to protect tangible and intangible cultural heritage abroad. Examples included the International Conference for the Safeguarding of Cultural Heritage in Conflict Areas (Abu Dhabi, December 2016) and the creation of the International https://ec.europa.eu/culture/content/european-framework-action-cultural-heritage_en5 Newsletter 4
  5. 5. CReW Project Alliance for the protection of heritage in conflict areas (ALIPH) in March 2017. ALIPH is an international foundation whose purpose is to manage resources for the implementation of preventive and emergency protection programmes for cultural property in conflict areas. Finally, Miki Braniste (curator) shared her experience as a curator for the Cultural Management Academy (CMA), a regional network of knowledge originally initiated by EUNIC cluster and now implemented by the Goethe Institute. The CMA offers a post graduate programme in four countries (Romania, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Greece) whose goals are to build capacity and increase the competences of the cultural operators in the region in order to engage participants from both public and independent sectors, establish cross-border international network, and foster exchange of expertise, best practices, and international collaboration. Session 2. “Pracademics” at work Taking a multidisciplinary and critical approach, academics from different areas of research discussed the issue of protecting tangible and intangible cultural heritage and engaged practitioners and policy- makers. Janet Blake, Professor of Law at the University of Shahid Beheshti (Tehran), led participants through cultural heritage law-making at the international level, looking at the different waves of law-making and applying them in a broader policy context. A particular emphasis was placed on one of the latest waves, which looks at cultural heritage as an enabler of sustainability. Simon Dancey, CEO of Creative and Cultural Skills, addressed the protection and valorization of cultural heritage in Latin America. Cases in Brazil and Colombia provided the audience with insight into the radical cultural policies in each country and explained how these policies are intrinsically linked to the development of alternative imaginaries. Richard Higgott, research professor at VUB – Institute of European Studies (EL-CSID, European leadership in cultural, science, and innovation diplomacy) urged a note of caution on the populist- nationalist challenge to the protection and valorization of tangible and intangible cultural heritage at EU level.   David Mattingly, Professor of archaeology at the University of Leicester, used his experience from working on the EAMENA project (Endangered Archaeology in the MENA region) to look at the dimensions of the crisis and the challenges in delivering what is needed to enhance protection of the threatened cultural heritage, especially in conflict areas. The EAMENA project identifies and monitors threats to the conservation of cultural heritage across the MENA region. Session 3. The New Agenda for Culture and its external dimension. The role of the Action Plan in Strengthening EU international cultural relations Discussing his experience as Head of Arts and Society at the British Council, Stephen Stenning advocated for increased cooperation among international development agencies, with a particular focus on heritage. This would provide a real opportunity to address global challenges while understanding local contexts, and an opportunity to find innovative and creative responses that value local communities and the human experience and turn down aggressive national self-interest. Newsletter 5
  6. 6. CReW Project Parallel workshops on how to enhance European cooperation in EU’s external action on cultural heritage Last but not least, Gitte Zschoch, Director EUNIC Global, recalled the milestones and history of introducing culture as a part of EU external relations, offered a detailed description of the New Agenda for Culture, and highlighted the role of EUNIC as a partner to EU Member States, supporting cooperation and strengthening partnerships. Newsletter 6 Conclusion There is a linkage between social and cultural dynamics within the EU as a cultural heritage community and its external relations. Nowadays, the EU is facing a deep identity crisis and there is concern about the stability and sustainability of the European project itself. In this framework, cultural heritage issues push us to reflect on the European identity and how it is projected internationally. What we are is what we think we are and what the others think we are, therefore interaction is fundamental. In this sense, cooperation on cultural heritage could not only be an opportunity to improve relations with external partners, especially in the EU Neighbourhood, but also an opportunity to strengthen unity within the EU without sacrificing cultural diversity.
  7. 7. CReW Project Recommendations for reinforcing cooperation on cultural heritage Cooperation on cultural heritage:An intra-EU and extra-EU joint venture • The European Framework for Action on Cultural Heritage should cover both the internal and external dimensions of EU action. Specific packages should be developed to strengthen cooperation on cultural heritage between EU Member States and between the EU and its third partners. • In practical terms, cultural heritage is an opportunity for joint action. A strategic approach is needed and should include specific “tools”. Two packages may be envisaged: expert knowledge and skills exchange and transfer, with a focus on digital content skills (digital reconstruction, democratization of access to culture, databases), and a cooperation on shared heritage, within the EU but also with accession and neighbor countries. To make it possible, sustainability of funding is crucial (e.g. East European Performing Arts Platform), as well as an aggregated strategy for international mobility and international accreditation of training relating to cultural heritage. We also strongly recommend strengthening support to social activism for cultural heritage at community level. A participatory governance and management of cultural heritage • Cultural heritage protection should be based on mutuality and open listening. EU institutions should not engage with a pre-determined notion of cultural heritage but should be open to discuss it with partner countries; moreover, policy-makers should not fear to address sensitive topics: for example, acknowledgment of former power imbalances due to the colonial history is a step forward to establish mutual and balanced cultural relations. • It is necessary to avoid conditionality and promote bottom-up approaches and ethical partnerships, by: consulting all stakeholders to promote collaboration based on priority needs; involving partner countries in governance; engaging local institutions to address needs and implement structural change; involving local cultural operators in decision-making and management (e.g. interdependent ecology of partners and cross-border networks). • Cooperation on cultural heritage should rest on some basic principles. The EU should: implement funding mechanisms with transparent eligibility criteria and outcomes-based approach and should facilitate Member States’ donors to take a joined approach (e.g. role of the Cultural Heritage Funders Network); promote a broad and inclusive definition of cultural heritage and its value to communities; favour decision making informed by appropriate expertise, best practice and awareness of complementary initiatives. • Building on the Joint Communication, we recommend maximizing the work of EUNIC. The network holds expertise in working in third countries with local stakeholders and is a leading facilitator for cooperation between EU Member States. EUNIC members, especially national Newsletter 7
  8. 8. CReW Project cultural institutes, have long-standing partnerships in many third countries and EUNIC itself is already working with EU delegations. Cultural Heritage:An ever-evolving concept • Heritage is a holistic concept. Intangible heritage has tangible aspects and vice versa. • Cultural heritage is a living resource. We need to address it as a fluid phenomenon that is continuously shared and shaped by multiple, coexisting heritage communities. For example, migration flows have brought multiple intangible cultural heritages to the EU. There is great potential for cultural development based on mutual contamination and shared growth. The notion of cultural diversity needs to be protected and valorized. • We agree that protecting and valorising cultural heritage is a cross-cutting area of policy actions at the EU-level, ranging from the economic to the social and external dimensions. However, we believe it is crucial to initiate a shared reflection on the symbolic elements of culture, which seem to be absent in current policies, including the New European Agenda for Culture. We strongly recommend having space for art for sake of art’s, alongside the social and economic dimensions. Safeguarding cultural heritage • Threats to tangible and intangible heritage in conflict areas are wide-ranging and ever-evolving. Conflict-related intentional destruction, looting, and vandalism have recently received heavy media attention and caused a spread of preventive and emergency protection programmes for cultural property, especially in the MENA region. However, they do not represent the main threat to cultural heritage, as agricultural expansion, urban expansion, lack of planning regulations are often more damaging. This is also due to poor enforcement of antiquity laws in the area, lack of engagement of local policy makers, and a widespread public apathy to cultural heritage. Therefore, we suggest that EU funding should also be allocated to strengthen additional mitigation strategies to: enhance funding and competence of heritage agencies, influence policy makers, strengthen legal sanctions, and invest in public heritage education • In general terms, heritage builds on three pillars: environmental, economic, and socio-cultural. It can provide an economic resource to communities, be a basis for social and cultural resilience, and be a strong environmental advocate. As reported by the Faro Convention, measures taken to safeguard cultural heritage are not some peripheral activity, but rather constitute essential actions for progress. Cultural heritage can be used sustainably to create economic and social conditions favourable to the survival of a plurality of heritage communities. • Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage should be part of the broader EU policy-making with regard to sustainability. This can be done in many areas: food security, health care, quality education for all, environmental sustainability through stronger community-based resilience to natural disasters and climate change, income generation through productive employment and decent work, tourism towards sustaining livelihoods, inclusive economic development, contributing to the peace and security dimension of sustainable development through preventing disputes and post-conflict resolution. Newsletter 8

×