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WATER WINGS, BIKE HELMETS,ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAP AND          How to teach a “hand-heldHELICOPTER PARENTS:             genera...
WHY ARE THEY LIKE THIS? • Parenting has   changed • Emphasis on   safety • Belief that they can   be anything they   want ...
HELICOPTER PARENTS Term coined by Foster W. Cline and Jim Fay defining a parent  who pays extremely close attention to th...
IT MEANS: We have to take new approaches We have to expect new excuses We have to change strategies We have to mentor ...
FROM THE CHOPPER, BACK TO THEGROUND Students today are used to          We are tasked with guiding  being dropped off at...
V =VITALITY      ISTA In Broadcasting, we teach students to have vitality on the air. We  explain that they need a certai...
I INDEPENDENV     =    STACE This generation wants details. They want to know exactly what    you want them to do for an ...
VI   S =SENSE         TA  Our students may struggle when determining goals and     limitations. Parents may have told the...
T =THINKINGVIS       A This generation has had a lot of thinking done for them. Parents      think and strategize for the...
VIST   A=APPRECIATION A “catered to” generation has trouble appreciating the people and       opportunities around them. ...
HELP YOUR STUDENTS SEE THEV.I.S.T.A. OF ACCOMPLISHMENT                      Thank you
BEA Ignite: Brent Foster
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BEA Ignite: Brent Foster

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BEA 2012 Ignite presentation

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BEA Ignite: Brent Foster

  1. 1. WATER WINGS, BIKE HELMETS,ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAP AND How to teach a “hand-heldHELICOPTER PARENTS: generation” to be proactive broadcast industry leaders. Dr. Brent Foster Cal State Univ. Fullerton
  2. 2. WHY ARE THEY LIKE THIS? • Parenting has changed • Emphasis on safety • Belief that they can be anything they want to be • Have made few choices on their own • Require direction
  3. 3. HELICOPTER PARENTS Term coined by Foster W. Cline and Jim Fay defining a parent who pays extremely close attention to their childrens experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. What does this mean for us, as educators?
  4. 4. IT MEANS: We have to take new approaches We have to expect new excuses We have to change strategies We have to mentor more, teach less We have to evolve
  5. 5. FROM THE CHOPPER, BACK TO THEGROUND Students today are used to  We are tasked with guiding being dropped off at the top. them to the top. We can’t They don’t realize the effort carry them, they have to required to summit under make it on their own. their own power. How to achieve the V.I.S.T.A of accomplishment with our students:
  6. 6. V =VITALITY ISTA In Broadcasting, we teach students to have vitality on the air. We explain that they need a certain energy when they open a mic or address the camera. The same can be said for the students desire to be part of the broadcast industry. We need to remind students that they have to set themselves apart from all the other candidates. Vitality is something that will serve them well on the air, off the air, in the classroom and in the industry. TIP: Liken the classroom (or studio) to a sports team. You’re the coach and they are key players on the team. Everyone has to give their all (vitality) to make the team and to win.
  7. 7. I INDEPENDENV = STACE This generation wants details. They want to know exactly what you want them to do for an assignment. You can become frustrated when students struggle to grasp the elements of an assignment and add their own “voice” to the piece. This comes from an inexperience with independent approaches. They’re used to having their hand held. TIP: stick to your guns, if you have an assignment that requires students to take an independent approach to a macro concept, refuse to provide further details. *showing previous examples is a good compromise that will often get the students engaged.
  8. 8. VI S =SENSE TA  Our students may struggle when determining goals and limitations. Parents may have told them they can be anything they want to be, but we know that it’s a hard world out there. This generation may have to be grounded and given a reality check in positive ways. Their sense of what it will take for success is often skewed and when reality sinks in, it can lead to self-loathing.  TIP: have a talk with your class about whether common sense is nature or nurture. Use examples of your experiences and get them internalizing their own natural and nurtured senses. If you teach journalism, students should have a “nose for news.” We can all agree, that employers want to hire people that have common sense.
  9. 9. T =THINKINGVIS A This generation has had a lot of thinking done for them. Parents think and strategize for their children; helping them make wise decisions and choices. Unfortunately, the kids never get a chance to think for themselves. Rational thought is often tied to experience with past mistakes and suffering. If a student hasn’t experienced much adversity in life, they may be timid to think on their own. TIP: Take baby steps. Break a large project down into smaller pieces that students can think about in stages. I’ve found that this approach allows students to build confidence in thought. Avoid overwhelming this generation, take baby steps up the mountain until things starts to “sink in.”
  10. 10. VIST A=APPRECIATION A “catered to” generation has trouble appreciating the people and opportunities around them. They often feel entitled. Student entitlement can lead to professor RAGE. Appreciation can be tethered to usefulness. Use examples like BEA membership, tapeless cameras, internet radio and blogs to link appreciation to useful opportunities. TIP: Show students some old equipment (e.g., RtoR machine or Tape-to-tape editor) explaining the cumbersome and limiting nature of gear from the past. If possible, have them handle the gear. Discuss how things have changed (e.g., become smaller, nonlinear, quality) and include how the new technological innovations have created new production opportunities. Seek ways for them to appreciate the useful nature of school equipment and discuss how they can use it to their advantage.
  11. 11. HELP YOUR STUDENTS SEE THEV.I.S.T.A. OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Thank you

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