Blended Learning: Possibilities for Transformative Learning

4,179 views

Published on

Keynote address presented August 22, 2012 at the Toronto District School Board's Summer Institute organized by the ICT-Teaching and Learning with Technology and the Library and Learning Resources and Interdisciplinary Studies departments. See http://cresenciafong.com/blog/?p=92.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,179
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2,634
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Blended Learning: Possibilities for Transformative Learning

  1. 1. Blended Learning: Possibilities for Transformative Learning Cresencia Fong • http://cresenciafong.com • @cresencia TDSB Educator (on leave) • OISE/UT PhD Student TDSB TLT & LLRIS Summer Institute 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  2. 2. Blended Learning What is “blended learning”? Why blend? What might it look like? How to blend? Some helpful resources...Thursday, August 23, 2012
  3. 3. What is Blended Learning? communication synchronous face-to-face online (f2f) mobile (i.e. augmented reality, probes, photo/video/audio asynchronous recording, GPS, internet, etc.) environmentsThursday, August 23, 2012
  4. 4. What is Blended Learning? communication synchronous face-to-face online (f2f) mobile asynchronous (i.e. augmented reality, probes, photo/video/audio recording, GPS, internet, etc.) environmentsThursday, August 23, 2012
  5. 5. What is Blended Learning? A look at blended learning through the differentiated instruction lens... collective peer-created knowledge base across f2f, online, mobile, immersive, flexible Environment multiple cohorts and sections (e.g., wiki, blog) grouping, shared responsibility for learning Content online discussion, blog journalling/ Process commenting, wiki publishing, construction, tagging, blogging, annotating, videocasting, moderating, podcasting, Product collaborating, animating, wiki-ing, exploring simulations & programming, re- virtual manipulatives, mixing, etc. web searching, etc.Thursday, August 23, 2012
  6. 6. Why Blend? convenient student access to learning materials, even if absent classroom walls softened, flexible school day continuous student reflection of their own learning (which aligns with constructivist approaches to learning) democratizes student access to peers ideas increases likelihood of symmetric progress within the knowledge community embeds peer assessmentThursday, August 23, 2012
  7. 7. Why Blend? MORE & More Complex Interactions student-content, student-student, student-teacher, student-technology S S S S S T S S T S f2f offline discussion about online discussion f2f offline “I-R-E” discussion (or just an online discussion) limited time continuous discourse flow teacher-directed student-directed teacher-centred idea-centredThursday, August 23, 2012
  8. 8. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? Information/Literature Circles (Gr. 7/8, 2007-08) Ann da Mota’s TEL Info/Lit circles Can begin with a very structured model: 1 sub-conference per info circle Each student has a specific role Gradually move away from roles, and emphasize the discussion *(Ann da Mota was Teacher-Librarian @ Gordon A. Brown MS at the time)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  9. 9. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? Human Diseases Wiki (Gr. 11 Biology, 2007) (Peters & Slotta, 2010)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  10. 10. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? Human Diseases Wiki (Gr. 11 Biology, 2007) (Peters & Slotta, 2010)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  11. 11. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? Human Diseases Wiki (Gr. 11 Biology, 2007) (Peters & Slotta, 2010)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  12. 12. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? WallCology (Gr. 6 Biodiversity, 2011) (James D. Slotta’s Encore Lab @ OISE/UT & Tom Moher’s Learning Technologies Group @ UIC, funded by NSF & SSHRC) • 2 teachers and their 2 classes of gr. 5/6 students • 7 weeks, Fall 2011Thursday, August 23, 2012
  13. 13. What Might Blended Learning Look Like? WallCology (Gr. 6 Biodiversity, 2011) (James D. Slotta’s Encore Lab @ OISE/UT & Tom Moher’s Learning Technologies Group @ UIC, funded by NSF & SSHRC)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  14. 14. How to Blend F2F with Online Learning Environments? Integrate interactive materials in a project-based context “Scaffold” students as they work collaboratively Use technology tools for inquiry Provide procedural guidance Incorporate online discussions, reflection notes, journals, IWBs, visualizations Provide cognitive guidance to promote reflection and critique Embed assessments of conceptual understanding Adopt new inquiry practices (Slotta, 2008)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  15. 15. How to Blend? Designing Inquiry with Technology Make ideas visible (e.g., simulations, real-time data) Help students learn from each other (e.g., online discussions, classroom debates) Provide accessible models and topics (e.g., use scaffolding) Promote autonomous lifelong learning (e.g., design, debate, or critique activities) (Slotta, 2008)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  16. 16. How to Blend? Knowledge Community & Inquiry (KCI) Model Put forth by James D. Slotta as an accessible way to integrate knowledge communities and scaffolded inquiry (see Slotta & Najafi, 2012) Basic principles: 1. Students work together as a community to produce a knowledge base 2. A sequence of collaborative inquiry activities draw upon the knowledge base as a resource 3. The inquiry activities must address the community’s emergent big ideas and result in assessable outcomes that target learning expectationsThursday, August 23, 2012
  17. 17. How to Blend? Consider Co-operative Learning... http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/intech/cooperativelearning.htm#activities partners learning management system circle the sage (AW, D2L, moodle) think-pair-share asynchronous discussion forum team pair solo synchronous discussion wiki (Voicethread, Lino, Today’s Meet) 3-step interview document collaboration blog round-robin brainstorming (Google Docs, PrimaryPad, Prezi) numbered heads together social bookmarking/annotation 3-minute interview (Diigo) multi-modal notetaking jigsaw (Evernote)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  18. 18. How to Blend? F2F + Online Discourse 1.Oral “warm-up” discussion task (e.g., news article). 2.Continue discussion task in online forum (e.g., different news article). 3.Teacher orchestration cycle: redirect, reflect, refocus, release scaffold technology tool usage, gradual release of responsibility © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  19. 19. How to Blend? 4Rs Cycle for Blended Discourse Oral discussion Redirect Online discussion Make connections, Release rise above Reflect (synthesis) Refocus © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  20. 20. How to Blend? 4Rs Cycle for Blended Discourse Oral discussion Redirect student attention from online discourse Redirect work (i.e. laptops/tablets) to f2f Online discussion about online postings discussion Make connections, Release rise above Reflect (synthesis) Refocus © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  21. 21. How to Blend? 4Rs Cycle for Blended Discourse Oral discussion Redirect Reflect on posting(s) with students to: Online • clarify understanding of postings discussion with authors • highlight common big ideas or unique perspectives Make connections, • make connections between Release rise above Reflect multiple postings (synthesis) • relate postings to: prior knowledge, real-world examples, or primary data • "bend" students’ language toward normative language for that subject area Refocus • position students in inquiry roles © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  22. 22. How to Blend? 4Rs Cycle for Blended Discourse Oral discussion Redirect Online discussion Make connections, Release rise above Reflect (synthesis) Refocus students to address a big idea, unique perspective, or a data Refocus discrepancy/deficit © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  23. 23. How to Blend? 4Rs Cycle for Blended Discourse Oral discussion Redirect Online discussion Release Make connections, Release rise above students back to online discourse Reflect work (i.e. laptops/tablets) (synthesis) Refocus © Cresencia Fong, 2012Thursday, August 23, 2012
  24. 24. How to Blend? Some helpful resources... www.tdsb.on.ca/ictstandardsThursday, August 23, 2012
  25. 25. How to Blend? Some helpful resources... http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Blooms+Digital+Taxonomy (Andrew Churches, 2009)Thursday, August 23, 2012
  26. 26. How to Blend? Some helpful resources... http://www.iste.org/ standards/nets-for- students.aspx • ISTE NETS for students 2007 • ISTE NETS for students 2007: Profiles • NETS Implementation WikiThursday, August 23, 2012
  27. 27. References Moher, T. (2006). Embedded Phenomena: Supporting Science Learning with Classroom-sized Distributed Simulations. Proceedings ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ‘06) (Vol. Montreal, Quebec, Canada, pp. 691–700). Peters, V. L., & Slotta, J. D. (2010). Scaffolding knowledge communities in the classroom: New opportunities in the Web 2.0 era. Designs for Learning Environments of the Future, 205–232. Scardamalia, M. (2002). Collective Cognitive Responsibility for the Advancement of Knowledge. Liberal Education In A Knowledge Society (pp. 67–98). Chicago, IL: Open Court. Retrieved from http://online.oise.utoronto.ca/webkf/ Introduction%20to%20Knowledge%20Building%20(Fall%2006)/SharedFolder/CollectiveCog.pdf Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. (2006). Knowledge building: Theory, pedagogy, and technology. The Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (pp. 97–118). New York: Cambridge University Press. Slotta, J. D. (2010). Evolving the classrooms of the future: The interplay of pedagogy, technology and community. In K. Makital-Siegl, F. Kaplan, Z. J., & F. F. (Eds.), Classroom of the Future: Orchestrating collaborative spaces (pp. 215–242). Rotterdam: Sense. Slotta, J.D. & Najafi, H. (2012). Supporting Collaborative Knowledge Construction with Web 2.0 Technologies. In Emerging Technologies for the Classroom: A Learning Sciences Perspective (N. Lavigne, Ed.). Slotta, J. D., & Najafi, H. (2010). Knowledge Communities in the Classroom. In P. Peterson, E. Baker, & B. McGaw (Eds.), International Encyclopedia of Education (pp. 189–196).Thursday, August 23, 2012
  28. 28. Thank-you! Cresencia Fong http://cresenciafong.com @cresenciaThursday, August 23, 2012

×