Andrew Williams - The Role of the Built Environment in Social Programmes - Healthcare

1,120 views

Published on

Andrew Williams, BRE, presentation at Future Homes: Building better lifestyles for an ageing population, 30 July 2011

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,120
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
340
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Andrew Williams - The Role of the Built Environment in Social Programmes - Healthcare

  1. 1. BRE Health – the role of the built environment in socialprogrammes - healthcareAndrew Williams, Director of Innovation, BREDr Ranjit Bassi (bassir@bre.co.uk)Dr Keith Quillin (quillink@bre.co.uk)
  2. 2. The role of the built environment to 2020 andbeyondWinston Churchill „we shape our buildings thereafter they shape us‟This is not news; but we are entering a new era where its importance will escalate rapidly – we must now deliver social equity (social programmes)……. sustainably (in that order!) The National Academy of Public Administration defines the term as “The fair, just and equitable management of all institutions serving the public directly or by contract; the fair, just and equitable distribution of public services and implementation of public policy; and the commitment to promote fairness, justice, and equity in the formation of public policy.
  3. 3. OECD 63 p.c. scenario breakdown: EXTREMESCENARIO Scenario 6: Other Spending Growing at trend and Lower GDP Growth (IFS - Assumption) accounting for 2009 GDP reduction Age related Public Expenditure 1999 2000 2009 2010 2011 2012 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 Education 4.5% 4.5% 6.0% 6.1% 6.1% 6.2% 6.8% 6.8% 6.9% 7.0% 7.0% 7.1% Pension2 7.3% 7.8% 8.5% 8.6% 8.7% 8.7% 10.3% 10.5% 10.6% 10.8% 11.0% 11.1% Health 5.3% 5.2% 8.0% 8.1% 8.2% 8.3% 9.9% 10.0% 10.2% 10.3% 10.5% 10.6% Total Age related spending 17.1% 17.5% 22.5% 22.7% 23.0% 23.2% 27.0% 27.3% 27.7% 28.1% 28.4% 28.8% Other Spending General Public Services3 4.5% 3.9% 3.9% 3.8% 3.8% 3.7% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% 3.2% 3.1% 3.1% Defense 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% Public Order and Safety 2.0% 1.9% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.7% 3.7% 3.8% 3.9% 4.0% 4.1% 4.3% Economic Affairs4 2.2% 2.3% 3.1% 3.3% 3.4% 3.5% 5.9% 6.1% 6.4% 6.6% 6.9% 7.2% Environmental Protection 0.5% 0.5% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% 0.9% 1.7% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.2% Housing and Community Amenities 0.6% 0.5% 1.1% 1.1% 1.2% 1.2% 2.6% 2.8% 3.0% 3.1% 3.3% 3.5% Recreation, Culture and Religion 0.8% 0.8% 1.0% 1.0% 1.0% 1.0% 1.3% 1.4% 1.4% 1.4% 1.5% 1.5% Social Protection5 5.6% 5.2% 6.0% 6.1% 6.2% 6.3% 7.2% 7.3% 7.4% 7.5% 7.6% 7.7% Accounting Adjustments 1.4% 1.2% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.8% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% Total Other Spending 20.4% 19.1% 22.6% 23.0% 23.3% 23.7% 30.5% 31.2% 31.9% 32.7% 33.5% 34.3% Total Public Expenditure 37.5% 36.6% 45.1% 45.7% 46.3% 46.9% 57.5% 58.6% 59.6% 60.7% 61.9% 63.1%
  4. 4. Just a new way of thinking!• But as the OECDs Berglind Asgeirsdottir puts it (the burden of ageing population): "Speaking of the burden... will only be valid if we fail to restructure society and its institutions to reflect these new realities”
  5. 5. The influences on the built environment will besignificant• Buildings should not be passive in how they consume resources or respond to the way we use them• Significant increase in energy costs (70%)• Potential brown-out in 2018/20• New service models for healthcare, LA services, inclusion, safety etc• Grid supply energy models will change – more local renewables – demand management• Communication networks and capabilities will grow• Data liquidity = financial liquidity• New commercial data/energy models with High Street names• As platforms become ubiquitous, „consumer electronics‟ will hit hard
  6. 6. THE STOCK
  7. 7. Age profile for the projecteddomestic UK building stock 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 New #REF! 1976- 1960-75 1939-59 Pre-1918
  8. 8. Age profile for the projected non-domestic UK building stock 1,200,000Analysis1 By 2050, 60% of the building 1,000,000stock will have been built priorto 2010. 800,0002 To achieve an 68.4 MtCO 600,000reduction in CO2 emissions by2050, improvements to existing 400,000buildings will be requiredalongside the construction of 200,000new zero-carbon buildings. 0 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050BRE, 2010 Energy Efficiency in New and Existing Pre-2010 2011-2015 2016-2020 2021-2025 2026-2030 2031-2035 2036-2040 2041-2045 2046-2050Buildings... 8
  9. 9. WHAT ABOUT THE STOCK?IT IS RELATIVELY WELL UNDERSTOOD THANKS TO CLGAND THE ENGLISH HOUSING SURVEY, FOR EXAMPLE
  10. 10. Why the need for a national survey?• Established link between poor housing and poor health• Housing stock old – difficult to manage and maintain• Difficult to adapt to modern requirements• Difficult to make energy efficient• Many owners don‟t have resources for upkeep/improvement• Limited funds for social housing• Mismatch between housing need and provision.
  11. 11. Physical and social data• The EHS collects more than just data on the physical building: – age – type of the home – current occupants – household type – income – details of any occupants with disabilities – etc.
  12. 12. Decent homes – the current standard forhousing• Four key components – Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) – Thermal Comfort – Disrepair – Modern AmenitiesLets consider one aspect, HHSRS
  13. 13. The HHSRS is based on…1. Damp and mould growth 17. Personal hygiene, Sanitation and2. Excess cold Drainage3. Excess heat 18. Water supply4. Asbestos (and MMF) 19. Falls associated with baths etc5. Biocides 20. Falling on level surfaces etc6. Carbon Monoxide and fuel combustion 21. Falling on stairs etc products 22. Falling between levels7. Lead 23. Electrical hazards8. Radiation 24. Fire9. Uncombusted fuel gas 25. Flames, hot surfaces etc10. Volatile Organic Compounds 26. Collision and entrapment11. Crowding and space 27. Explosions12. Entry by intruders 28. Position and operability of amenities etc13. Lighting 29. Structural collapse and falling elements14. Noise15. Domestic hygiene, Pests and Refuse16. Food safety
  14. 14. Health Impact Assessment of mitigating falls onstairs hazards for West Lancashire Savings achieved each year and cost of repairs £450Thousands £400 £350 £300 £250 £200 £150 £100 £50 £0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Years NHS costs saved this year Cost of repairs
  15. 15. BRE HEALTH
  16. 16. UK Population
  17. 17. BRE Health Building fabric Social & HealthDigital & smart buildings Provision
  18. 18. BRE Health• To develop a decision support tool and associated consultancy services to enable built environment designers and commissioners to:• Understand the options available to provide digital health and social care within a range of domestic built environments for whole population groups, and using new build and retrofit programmes (strategic)• Be able to assess the digital health and social care requirements of specific groups within wider populations and to understand the related domestic built environment options (strategic)• Be able to design large scale and individual retrofit programmes to maximise the potential for digital inclusion of residents including provision for future digital health and care requirements at minimal up front cost and minimising future costs (practitioner)• Develop a methodology for assessing the building for delivering, services required, minimum requirements of services and user needs.
  19. 19. BRE Health – proof of concept• Care homes (developing now)• Gated communities• Residential• Polyclinics/PCTs• Communities
  20. 20. BRE Health
  21. 21. BRE Health in action
  22. 22. BRE Health – a driver for change?• Help manage and optimise service delivery (with many others)• Providing system transparency: – Individual – Dwelling/block – Service provider (local, national) – Product supplier/manufacturer• Stimulate new markets (services and products)• Drive industry change for the better
  23. 23. BRE Health – What next?• Consultation with key ALIP partners regarding BRE Health and others, eg: – Bournemouth – Willmott Dixon – Cisco• Identify technical areas that BRE Health needs to cover – Interoperability of tele-care and tele-health services• BRE Health event at INSITE 2011 in October 2011 at BRE – Funding from BRE to develop methodology and test in 10-15 building – More information on BRE Health
  24. 24. Contact BRE for more details of the programme• Dr Ranjit Bassi (bassir@bre.co.uk)• Dr Keith Quillin (quillink@bre.co.uk)• Andrew Williams (williamsa@bre.co.uk)

×