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The exchange between open access and open educational resources: What can we learn?

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This is presentation given at the 2014 SPARC Open Access meeting in Kansas City, MO on March 3, 2014. The presentation was given by Timothy Vollmer from Creative Commons as a part of a panel on policy & advocacy.

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The exchange between open access and open educational resources: What can we learn?

  1. 1. The exchange between open access and open educational resources: What can we learn? Timothy Vollmer 3 March 2014
  2. 2. (1) Content
  3. 3. OA OER
  4. 4. Takeaway: OA articles feeding OER
  5. 5. (2) Policy
  6. 6. OER OA
  7. 7. What’s important?
  8. 8. 4Rs
  9. 9. Reuse Redistribute Revise Remix
  10. 10. Astroturfing? Sure.
  11. 11. Policy wins with these reuse rights? Yes.
  12. 12. Publicly funded resources are openly licensed resources.
  13. 13. ● clarify legal right to reuse! ● enable customization, remix, translation ● $$$ savings ● creators retain copyright ● entrepreneurial use ● compatibility with other OER ● standardization ● maximize potential impact of funds
  14. 14. What’s important?
  15. 15. 10 year recommendations for licensing and reuse: ● OA journals are always in a position to require open licenses...CC BY is recommended; ● Policy makers in a position to direct deposits under open licenses, preferably CC BY; ● Strategy! ○ Public access (free) better than toll access. ○ Open access (open licensing) is better than simply public access. ○ CC BY or equivalent is better than [more] restrictive open licenses.
  16. 16. We’ve got great OA publishers supporting BOAI
  17. 17. Where are the public policies supporting BOAI?
  18. 18. NIH: no
  19. 19. White House: no
  20. 20. FASTR: no*
  21. 21. Omnibus: no
  22. 22. RCUK: a mess
  23. 23. Why?
  24. 24. ● clarify legal right to reuse! ● enable customization, remix, translation ● $$$ savings ● creators retain copyright ● entrepreneurial use ● compatibility with other OER ● standardization ● maximize potential impact of funds
  25. 25. Problems are similar
  26. 26. Benefits are clear
  27. 27. What is needed?
  28. 28. (1) It’s 42.16km, not 100m.
  29. 29. ● Public access (free) better than toll access. ● Open access (open licensing) is better than public access. ● CC BY or equivalent is better than more restrictive open licenses. ● OA Publishers show the way! ● Keep an eye on OER policy
  30. 30. (2) #BOAI10 redux
  31. 31. Make connection between reuse rights and progress ● benefits to research and researchers ● how lack of OA impedes research ● increases the return on their investment in research ● amplifies the social and educational value of research ● costs can be recovered without (much) additional investment ● consistent with copyright law everywhere in the world ● consistent with the highest standards of quality
  32. 32. (3) The right to read is the right to mine.
  33. 33. Wanted: policies to enable “computational analysis using state-of-the-art technologies”
  34. 34. Great! Science is global. Let’s break down barriers to sharing and collaboration by standardizing around open formats and licenses.
  35. 35. TDM and licensing: be careful what you wish for...
  36. 36. Michael Carroll in PLOS: “... the license applies only to uses covered by copyright, and copyright does not regulate text mining - at least in the United States.” http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pbio.1001210
  37. 37. Thanks
  38. 38. This work is dedicated to the public domain. https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/. Attribution is optional, but if desired, please attribute to Creative Commons. Some content such as screenshots may appear here under exceptions and limitations to copyright and trademark law--such as fair use--and may not be covered by CC0.

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