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Developing Local, Sustainable Substrate Resources for the Great Plains<br />Dr. Cheryl R. Boyer<br />Assistant Professor a...
Why is Kansas here?<br />
Great Plains Region<br />Small, growing industry<br />Buy Local<br />Need for regional nursery crop production support<br ...
Hmm…<br />What does our industry look like?<br />
Number of Farms per Type of Operation in Kansas<br />Floriculture Crops: 225<br />Bedding/Garden Plants: 189 <br />Nursery...
2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey: Nurseries and Greenhouses Highlights<br />4,290 acres used for field production of orname...
2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey<br />
2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey<br />
Barriers to Industry Growth<br />Lack of experience<br />Lack of knowledge of the industry and current production practice...
But wait, Kansas has forests?<br />We can help with substrates!<br />
Yes, Kansas has Forests.<br />
2005 Kansas Forests Survey (January 2008)<br />Highlights<br />Forest land area increased from 1.5 million acres in 1994 t...
Areas of Concern<br />Since 1965<br />Oak growing stock has increased by 231%<br />Hickories by 224%<br />Maples by 231%<b...
Eastern Redcedar<br />Most material is in low density stands.<br />Is expanding throughout the Midwest<br />Suppression of...
Eastern Redcedar<br />Good wildlife cover, BUT<br />Reduces understory diversity and plant growth<br />Redcedar establishm...
How have we used it?<br />Alright, so There is Plenty<br />
John C. Pair Horticultural Research Center (Haysville, near Wichita)<br />Jason Griffin, Director<br />Cheryl Boyer<br />T...
1/2 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />Pine Bark<br />3/4 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />3/16 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />3/8 - inch<br />...
2009<br />Woody Plants<br />Baldcypress<br />Chinese Pistache<br />Baldcypress<br />¾” redcedar<br />Low or High Fertilize...
2010<br />Annual Plants<br />Vinca<br />Petunia<br />New Guinea Impatiens<br />3/16” redcedar<br />
2010<br />Woody Plants<br />2 trees<br />Baldcypress<br />Redbud<br />2 shrubs<br />Spirea<br />Crapemyrtle<br />2 perenni...
3/16”<br />
What Else Might We Use?<br />Scrubby/Weedy Plants<br />Maclurapomifera(Hedge Apple, Osage Orange)<br />Elm<br />Honeylocus...
We’re just getting started<br />In Summary…	<br />
Support for these projects is provided by:<br />
www.sustainablesubstrates.com<br />
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Boyer sna 2011

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Cheryl Boyer's presentation at the first annual Horticultural Research Institute's Substrates Conference in Mobile, AL on January 20, 2011.

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Boyer sna 2011

  1. 1. Developing Local, Sustainable Substrate Resources for the Great Plains<br />Dr. Cheryl R. Boyer<br />Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Ornamental Nursery Crops<br />Kansas State University<br />
  2. 2. Why is Kansas here?<br />
  3. 3. Great Plains Region<br />Small, growing industry<br />Buy Local<br />Need for regional nursery crop production support<br />Limited Resources<br />
  4. 4. Hmm…<br />What does our industry look like?<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Number of Farms per Type of Operation in Kansas<br />Floriculture Crops: 225<br />Bedding/Garden Plants: 189 <br />Nursery Stock: 136 <br />Total Greenhouse Vegetables and Fresh Cut Herbs: 46<br />Potted Flowering Plants: 39<br />Sod Harvested: 33<br />Cut Flowers and Cut Florist Greens: 30<br />Greenhouse Tomatoes: 30 <br />Other Greenhouse Vegetables and Fresh Cut Herbs: 23<br />Foliage Plants, Indoor: 21 <br />Vegetable Transplants: 8<br />Aquatic Plants: 7<br />Bulbs, Corms, Rhizomes and Tubers: 7<br />Other Nursery Crops: 6<br />Cuttings, Seedlings, Liners and Plugs: 4<br />Flower Seeds: 3<br />Vegetable Seeds: 3<br />Mushrooms: 2<br />
  7. 7. 2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey: Nurseries and Greenhouses Highlights<br />4,290 acres used for field production of ornamental trees and shrubs<br />490 acres for containerized production<br />8.2 million square feet of greenhouse production<br />4,700 paid and unpaid employees<br />
  8. 8. 2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey<br />
  9. 9. 2006 Kansas Horticulture Survey<br />
  10. 10. Barriers to Industry Growth<br />Lack of experience<br />Lack of knowledge of the industry and current production practices<br />Limited Resources<br />Water (wind, heat)<br />Substrates are expensive—NO NATIVE PINES!<br />
  11. 11. But wait, Kansas has forests?<br />We can help with substrates!<br />
  12. 12. Yes, Kansas has Forests.<br />
  13. 13. 2005 Kansas Forests Survey (January 2008)<br />Highlights<br />Forest land area increased from 1.5 million acres in 1994 to 2.1 million acres in 2005, representing about 4% of Kansas total land area.<br />Softwood = 5%<br />Oak/Hickory = 56% <br />Elm/Ash/Cottonwood forest types = 32%<br />Almost 95% of Kansas forest land is held by private landowners.<br />
  14. 14. Areas of Concern<br />Since 1965<br />Oak growing stock has increased by 231%<br />Hickories by 224%<br />Maples by 231%<br />and<br />Eastern redcedar has increased by 23,000%<br />(this is understated since they did not include 50,000 acres of small caliper (under 1”) of eastern redcedar seedlings)<br />23,000% !!!<br />
  15. 15. Eastern Redcedar<br />Most material is in low density stands.<br />Is expanding throughout the Midwest<br />Suppression of fire<br />Reduction of grazing on pastureland<br />First species to invade old fields<br />50,000 acres of seedlings = more expansion<br />
  16. 16. Eastern Redcedar<br />Good wildlife cover, BUT<br />Reduces understory diversity and plant growth<br />Redcedar establishment changes the ecological character of the site.<br />Major water usage (30 gal. per tree per day)<br />FIRE!<br />
  17. 17.
  18. 18. How have we used it?<br />Alright, so There is Plenty<br />
  19. 19. John C. Pair Horticultural Research Center (Haysville, near Wichita)<br />Jason Griffin, Director<br />Cheryl Boyer<br />Technicians<br />Graduate Students<br />Tami Myers<br />Zach Starr<br />Michelle Morales<br />Kory Nickell<br />Josh Pool<br />Mike Shelton<br />
  20. 20. 1/2 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />Pine Bark<br />3/4 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />3/16 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />3/8 - inch<br />Redcedar<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
  28. 28. 2009<br />Woody Plants<br />Baldcypress<br />Chinese Pistache<br />Baldcypress<br />¾” redcedar<br />Low or High Fertilizer<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
  32. 32. 2010<br />Annual Plants<br />Vinca<br />Petunia<br />New Guinea Impatiens<br />3/16” redcedar<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34. 2010<br />Woody Plants<br />2 trees<br />Baldcypress<br />Redbud<br />2 shrubs<br />Spirea<br />Crapemyrtle<br />2 perennials<br />Maidengrass<br />Black-eyed Susan<br />
  35. 35.
  36. 36.
  37. 37.
  38. 38. 3/16”<br />
  39. 39. What Else Might We Use?<br />Scrubby/Weedy Plants<br />Maclurapomifera(Hedge Apple, Osage Orange)<br />Elm<br />Honeylocust<br />Woody biomass residue from wood manufacturing companies and urban tree care activity<br />
  40. 40. We’re just getting started<br />In Summary… <br />
  41. 41. Support for these projects is provided by:<br />
  42. 42. www.sustainablesubstrates.com<br />

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