The true value of contentcuration.(Or: Why links are not enough.)@CraigSilvermanDirector of Content, Spundge
It’s 2004•Content marketing does not exist as a term.•Curation is something for people in the arts.•Blogs are relatively n...
I’m a freelance journalist living in a cheap Montreal apartmentmy friends would later refer to as a dark hovel.I want to s...
My idea
Regret the ErrorI picked something that was supposedly very important tojournalism, but that no one talked about: accuracy...
The site, roughlytwo years afterlaunch (2006)
It was curation before thatword was bastardized tomean what it does today.And by golly it worked.
The content: CorrectionsIt has come to the editor’s attention that the Herald-Leader neglectedto cover the civil rights mo...
The content: ErrorsA very bad headline on the left. A paper misspelling its own name on the right.
I was referred to as an expert in errors, corrections and accuracy. Bydoing the site, the curation, every day and owning t...
Books, columns, articles, speakingText
All because I spent an hour aday finding the best stuff within aniche, packaging it & pushing itout. Easy!YOU GUYS, let’s ...
Well, actually no...
I used curation as the foundation upon which tobuild out my expertise, knowledge and brand toenable me to take it to the n...
That’s why I’m helping build a product and company atSpundge that offers content discovery and curation andenables those a...
To recap...
Curation’s value: The obvious• Relevant content available at frequency demandedtoday.• Supplements your work with related ...
Curation’s value: Less obvious•Curation provides the raw material necessary to collectresearch, build knowledge and expert...
Don’t just stream out links and excerpts and thinkthat makes you interesting.Take those links and create somethinginterest...
Thank you!Let’s Connect:•@CraigSilverman | @Spundge•http://ca.linkedin.com/in/craigjsilverman•craig@spundge.com•http://blo...
The true value of content curation (Or: Why links are not enough)
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The true value of content curation (Or: Why links are not enough)

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This is the story of how a solid content curation strategy led to books, awards, columns, recognition, traffic and a whole new career.

It's also the story of how anyone can do it, and make it work for their business.

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  • This presentation is about using content curation to its full potential, and ending the link-barfing-short-excerpt-pushing madness.
  • Here’s some of the content I managed to discover and curate on my site. This stuff was funny, shocking, head scratching. I found it because almost no one else was looking for it on a daily basis. I found my niche and I worked it like a madman. I wrote year-end posts naming the best errors and corrections of the year. They got linked like crazy, and I did tons of radio interviews.
  • I used TypePad and put it together in one Sunday night. My friend did the logo. I emailed a private version of it to a few journalist friends. They gave me some feedback. I practiced blogging the site for about two weeks, and then launched, in October 2004. I sent out a press release to the media blogs I loved and emailed friends. I got about 10,000 visitors. I realized I was going to have to do this every day. This was what the blog looked like in 2006. See the posts? They’re really short, and I have several of them per day, five days a week. That’s because the bread and butter of the site was that I would find a highlight the most notable, amusing, awful, interesting corrections and errors from publications. Mostly, I just needed a system to find them. Then I needed a good headline, and a link back. I spent about an hour a day on the site, and it was working. No one else was doing this, and there were at least a few good, if not great, corrections each week.
  • Here’s some of the content I managed to discover and curate on my site. This stuff was funny, shocking, head scratching. I found it because almost no one else was looking for it on a daily basis. I found my niche and I worked it like a madman. I wrote year-end posts naming the best errors and corrections of the year. They got linked like crazy, and I did tons of radio interviews.
  • An NHL team oushit its opponent on the left. Thanks to a spellchecker gone awry, Reuters reports that “Queen Elizabeth has 10 times the lifespan of workers and lays up to 2,000 eggs a day” (It was supposed to say “queen bee”.)
  • Yes, it started with a curation blog. But when I launched I knew I need to buttress my curated corrections with something more substantial. So I wrote a post for the first day outlining research about corrections. Looking back, it was woefully inadequate and incomplete. Still, I knew even then that ultimately curation is not enough. But I had to get there, to that next phase. And curation was perfect for that.
  • The true value of content curation (Or: Why links are not enough)

    1. 1. The true value of contentcuration.(Or: Why links are not enough.)@CraigSilvermanDirector of Content, Spundge
    2. 2. It’s 2004•Content marketing does not exist as a term.•Curation is something for people in the arts.•Blogs are relatively nascent. Gawker covers mostlythe media in NY.•Twitter doesn’t exist.•The Huffington Post doesn’t exist.•Mark Zuckerberg is working on Facebook at Harvard.
    3. 3. I’m a freelance journalist living in a cheap Montreal apartmentmy friends would later refer to as a dark hovel.I want to start a blog like Gawker. Something that will helpestablish me in the media community, and hopefully lead tomore writing work.But how do I create a site that can achieve my goals, while stillenabling me to pay the rent with my other writing work?It had to be easy for me to keep up to date without a hugeamount of writing work.Meanwhile...
    4. 4. My idea
    5. 5. Regret the ErrorI picked something that was supposedly very important tojournalism, but that no one talked about: accuracy and corrections.I also picked it because corrections were perfect content: bite-sizedbits of text, often hidden away by publications, that could behilarious, shocking, puzzling. And that no one really paid muchattention to.I dedicated myself to finding the best of those and publishing them.I called the site Regret the Error, in honor of the phrase “we regretthe error,” which often accompanied corrections.
    6. 6. The site, roughlytwo years afterlaunch (2006)
    7. 7. It was curation before thatword was bastardized tomean what it does today.And by golly it worked.
    8. 8. The content: CorrectionsIt has come to the editor’s attention that the Herald-Leader neglectedto cover the civil rights movement. We regret the omission. - Herald-LeaderAn Oct. 19 article on songwriter John Bucchino incorrectly stated thathe doesn’t read. The sentence should have said he doesn’t readmusic. - Dallas Morning NewsThe Denver Daily News would like to offer a sincere apology for atypo in Wednesday’s Town Talk regarding New Jersey’s proposal toban smoking in automobiles. It was not the author’s intention to callNew Jersey ‘Jew Jersey.’ - Denver News
    9. 9. The content: ErrorsA very bad headline on the left. A paper misspelling its own name on the right.
    10. 10. I was referred to as an expert in errors, corrections and accuracy. Bydoing the site, the curation, every day and owning this area, I builtcredibility.People began calling to interview me. The site was recognized by PCMagazine, Time magazine, Editor & Publisher etc.So I dove further into the work, researching the history of corrections,of errors. I looked into error prevention and the Japanese practice ofmistake-proofing.The curation led to other kinds of content creation.Amazing things happened
    11. 11. Books, columns, articles, speakingText
    12. 12. All because I spent an hour aday finding the best stuff within aniche, packaging it & pushing itout. Easy!YOU GUYS, let’s all start linkblogs!
    13. 13. Well, actually no...
    14. 14. I used curation as the foundation upon which tobuild out my expertise, knowledge and brand toenable me to take it to the next stage: originalcontent creation.I could have done a book that was just the bestcorrections. But that’s not a career. That’s not thereal value.The real takeaway
    15. 15. That’s why I’m helping build a product and company atSpundge that offers content discovery and curation andenables those aspects to power original content creation.That’s where the lasting value is for individuals andorganizations. I know from experience.How to do it
    16. 16. To recap...
    17. 17. Curation’s value: The obvious• Relevant content available at frequency demandedtoday.• Supplements your work with related content.• Builds community by offering love.• Communicates knowledge by selecting well.• Provides outside support for key messages.
    18. 18. Curation’s value: Less obvious•Curation provides the raw material necessary to collectresearch, build knowledge and expertise, spark ideas.•As such, curation feeds original creation, which is the mostvaluable kind of content.•Curation’s biggest value is as part of a larger contentstrategy with original content at the top of the pyramid.
    19. 19. Don’t just stream out links and excerpts and thinkthat makes you interesting.Take those links and create somethinginteresting.
    20. 20. Thank you!Let’s Connect:•@CraigSilverman | @Spundge•http://ca.linkedin.com/in/craigjsilverman•craig@spundge.com•http://blog.spundge.com•http://www.regrettheerror.comGive Spundge a try:•Free account: http://www.spundge.com/•Free 30-day trial of Pro: http://www.spundge.com/proI’d love to hear your feedback on this presentation, and about Spundge.

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