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Australian Cultural Resource Guide for Community Organisations

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For community organisations: Rather than reverting to stereotypes when engaging with people from culturally diverse backgrounds, use the cultural tips in this Cultural Resource Guide as a starting point.

We encourage you to share the relevant parts of these guidelines with your colleagues, or use them as a checklist and handy reference.

This project is an ongoing initiative of Moreton Bay Regional Council as part of their dedication to empowering community service partners with a suite of best-practice cross-cultural skills.

Craig Shim
Director and Founder, Alphacrane Intercultural Specialists
Queensland, Australia

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Australian Cultural Resource Guide for Community Organisations

  1. 1. Apr 2018 | Compiled by: Craig Shim, Alphacrane Intercultural Specialists
  2. 2. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved For community organisations: The best way to understand your customer is to build a personal relationship with them. However, sometimes you don’t have time for this. Rather than reverting to stereotypes in these situations, use the cultural tips in this Cultural Resource Guide as a starting point. We encourage you to share the relevant parts of these guidelines with your colleagues, or use them as a checklist and handy reference. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  3. 3. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved ▪ Why this Cultural Resource Guide was developed ▪ Stereotyping: Do’s and Don’ts ▪ Keeping perspective: Cultural Self-Awareness ▪ Our 10 cross-cultural scenarios (listed on the following slides) ▪ Further information Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  4. 4. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1. Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators 2. Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders 3. Work injuries. Influencing Asian workers to seek advice 4. Awkward situations. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal 5. Following rules and procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council (Cont’d on next slide)
  5. 5. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 6. Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services 7. Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders 8. Where to start? Accessing Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) resources 9. Keeping appointments. Influencing multicultural customers to keep within appointed timeslots 10. Sensitive conversations. Regarding children of Indigenous families Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  6. 6. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved This project is an ongoing initiative of Moreton Bay Regional Council as part of their dedication to empowering community service partners with a suite of best-practice cross-cultural skills. The project recognises that we can serve people from diverse cultural backgrounds better when we have Cultural Intelligence. This Cultural Resource Guide aims to ensure that our region’s service delivery practices are culturally informed. (Cont’d on next slide)
  7. 7. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved The simple act of tweaking service delivery practices to accommodate communication preferences and the underlying needs and wants of our culturally diverse customers can mean a world of difference. Knowing how to do that is the tricky part. So that’s why we brought together an enthusiastic team of local community service providers to co-design this Cultural Resource Guide.
  8. 8. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved These guidelines were co-created in the “Culturally Appropriate Service Delivery and Engagement” workshop hosted by Moreton Bay Regional Council on 18 April 2018. Designed and facilitated by Craig Shim from Alphacrane Intercultural Specialists, the workshop invited participants to identify real-life cross-cultural scenarios they encounter in the workplace. Using cultural frameworks provided in the workshop, participants then co-designed the guidelines outlined here. We hope you find them valuable in your own workplace.
  9. 9. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  10. 10. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Beware of stereotyping i.e. assuming everyone from a given culture is the same. Not only is this disrespectful, it can result in poor customer service decisions. Here are two common mistakes to avoid: ▪ Mistaken identity ▪ Passing negative judgement Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  11. 11. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Don’t assume that all customers of an ethnic appearance are from another country; that all migrants are unfamiliar with your local customs; or that they don’t speak English. If you’re uncertain whether a customer is a migrant with limited English language skills, simply say hello and ask with a friendly smile “can I help you?”. Then gauge from their response whether they’ve understood what you’ve said, and what further assistance you could provide. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  12. 12. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Catch yourself whenever you start using words such as “rude”, “inconsiderate”, or “lacking in common sense” to describe someone from another culture. These are judgement words and are nearly always based on your own world-view or cultural values. However, consider this - the same behaviour you find rude or selfish may be perfectly acceptable in another culture, and vice versa! . Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  13. 13. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Suspend your judgement. Instead of thinking to yourself “my customer is [unreasonable]”, pause and ask yourself these four questions: What specifically do I find [unreasonable], and why? Does my customer really know what’s appropriate in the local culture? Rather than assuming my customer is [unreasonable], have I really understood the situation from their perspective? Instead of treating my customer as an [unreasonable] person, what would be a more culturally-informed response? Step 1. Step 2. Step 3. Step 4.
  14. 14. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved There’s no universal rule about what’s considered good behaviour or bad behaviour. ▪ What’s considered polite to you may be unnecessary or even disrespectful in my culture, and vice versa. It all depends on our world view, or in other words, our perspective.
  15. 15. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Our perceptions of what’s considered “good service”, “appropriate behaviour”, “common sense”, “good manners” etc is shaped by what we’re most familiar with. It’s a fallacy to assume that people from other cultures always have the same perspectives as you.
  16. 16. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Pay attention to how you feel when you encounter “unusual” behaviour from people of different cultures. It doesn’t take much to have negative feelings towards someone whose behaviour doesn’t align with your upbringing. Just as you might feel uncomfortable with someone else’s behaviour, they may be feeling the same towards you, even though you’re trying your best to provide good service.
  17. 17. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  18. 18. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to instil a duty of care among Vietnamese forklift operators working within Australia’s strict work safety environment. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  19. 19. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid using the threat of penalties as the sole method of influencing Asian workers to follow Work Health Safety (WHS) rules. Why? Although penalties may be persuasive (regardless of culture), people from “group- oriented cultures” will often respond better to the suggestions explained on the following slides. 1 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  20. 20. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid publicly criticising or publicly “singling out” Asian workers who fail to follow Work Health Safety (WHS) rules. Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” can be highly conscious of saving face and may not respond well to being singled out in 2 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators front of others, particularly if they feel they are being unjustly treated (as is likely to be the case in this scenario).
  21. 21. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid giving the impression to Asian workers that reporting Work Health Safety (WHS) incidents equates to “dobbing in” their colleagues. Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” will often be protective of others in their “in- group” and will try to avoid bringing shame 3 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators to their group, especially if it implicates their group leader. Related to this is the importance they place on “saving face” for the group (not just for themselves).
  22. 22. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Reinforce the need to take ownership of personal responsibility in relation to WHS (people from “group oriented cultures” often expect this is solely the responsibility of their leaders, or will wait for specific instructions from their leaders). Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  23. 23. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Emphasise the importance of taking care of fellow workers (this may resonate well with people from “group oriented cultures”). 2 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  24. 24. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Explain the impact that disciplinary action will have on the group or team (this may resonate well with people from “group oriented cultures”). 3 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  25. 25. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved To emphasise the importance of taking personal and team responsibility for WHS, ask “how would you feel if you didn’t act and something tragic happened?” 4 Duty of care. Influencing Asian forklift operators Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  26. 26. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to encourage Pacific Islanders to turn up on time for classes and appointments.
  27. 27. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid embarrassing the student in front of the class e.g. reprimanding them in the presence of others. Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” can be highly conscious of saving face and may not respond well to being singled out in front of others, particularly if they feel they are being unjustly treated (as is likely to be the case in this scenario). 1 Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders
  28. 28. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Do make it clear to your student what your expectations are around punctuality, but have this conversation discreetly i.e. not in front of others. Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders
  29. 29. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 2 Politely explain to your student (or perhaps remind them) that in the Australian context lateness is perceived as a sign of disrespect. Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders
  30. 30. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 3 Explain to your student the impact their lateness has on their fellow students (this may resonate well with people from “group oriented cultures”). Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders
  31. 31. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 4 As a service provider, recognise that many cultures place a much higher emphasis on relationships compared with “task-oriented cultures” such as Australian culture where there’s a stronger emphasis on keeping time commitments. In this scenario, your Pacific Islander student may not have been late out of carelessness; instead they may have simply prioritised another relationship (e.g. Handling lateness. Influencing Pacific Islanders helping a family member) over arriving to class on time. Whilst it is appropriate to make clear to your student your expectations around punctuality, you should still anticipate the likelihood of lateness and consider making contingency plans to mitigate disruptions to your own schedule.
  32. 32. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Work injuries. Influencing Asian workers to seek legal advice Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to encourage Filipino workers to seek legal advice for work-related injuries.
  33. 33. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid giving the impression that raising a work-related injury claim equates to being disrespectful to the boss or employer. Why? People from cultures that have a higher emphasis of hierarchy can be highly conscious of not creating tension with their superiors. This may be 1 Work injuries. Influencing Asian workers to seek legal advice compounded if the worker is from a country where work safety isn’t as regulated as in Australia. They may be fearful of repercussions arising from “dobbing in” their boss or employer.
  34. 34. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Ask the worker to consider the long-term financial impact on their family (this may resonate well with people from “group oriented cultures”). Work injuries. Influencing Asian workers to seek legal advice
  35. 35. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 2 Reassure the worker that in Australia, systems are in place to support both the worker and the employer (this may resonate well with people from cultures that that have a higher emphasis on hierarchy). Work injuries. Influencing Asian workers to seek legal advice
  36. 36. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Awkward situation. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to respectfully respond to a situation whereby a culturally diverse colleague comes to work smelling of an exotic, yet pungent home-cooked meal.
  37. 37. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid embarrassing your co-worker in front of others e.g. discussing this sensitive topic in the presence of others. Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” can be especially conscious of saving face and may not respond well to being singled out in front of others, particularly if they feel they are being unjustly treated (as is likely to be the case in this scenario). 1 Awkward situation. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal
  38. 38. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid ostracising or gossiping. Shut down comments that are disrespectful or trivial. However, if the situation has a legitimate impact on colleagues or customers, don’t avoid the problem. It’s better to have a discreet and respectful conversation with your co-worker who maybe unaware of what’s going on rather than having others talk behind their back. 2 Why? Most of us are unaware of how different cultures perceive scents. We may not realise that our odour could be isolating us simply because we smell different from others. If this is the case, we would probably appreciate a caring friend pointing this out to us. Awkward situation. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal
  39. 39. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Approach the topic discreetly (away from others) by first seeking permission from your co-worker to have a conversation about a sensitive topic. If they agree, briefly mention your observation about their odour, the potential impact on others, and ask whether they’re aware of this. After listening for a response, reassure your co-worker you are only raising this out of respect for them as you hope they’d do the same for you under the same circumstances. Awkward situation. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal
  40. 40. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 2 After you’ve made your co-worker aware of the situation, you may not need to provide advice on how to manage the situation. Should your co-worker appear receptive to listening for advice, you could: ▪ explain that some people are sensitive to certain cooking smells ▪ suggest wearing a fresh uniform before coming in to work. Awkward situation. A co-worker who smells of an exotic meal
  41. 41. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to help venue hire customers from Pacific Islander and Middle Eastern backgrounds understand and follow the venue’s rules and procedures. Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  42. 42. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid embarrassing your customer in front of others e.g. when explaining to a customer that their venue booking has now ended and they need to vacate the room. Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” can be highly conscious of saving face and may not respond well to being given bad news in front of others. 1 Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  43. 43. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved If the situation is likely to have negative consequences on other customers (e.g. flow- on effect of running overtime), do not avoid addressing the situation. Let your customer know your expectations of them upfront, and any consequences of non-compliance (e.g. additional fees). 2 Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  44. 44. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid approaching anyone other than the most senior person in the room (or their assistant) when delivering a sensitive message (e.g. the need to vacate the venue- hire room). Why? People from cultures that place a higher emphasis on hierarchy may find it extremely difficult to deliver a sensitive issue to their leader. They may not convey your message correctly, or at all. 3 Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  45. 45. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers 1 Explain to the leader (or their assistant) the need to follow venue-hire rules and procedures for the sake of other customers. Let your customer know your expectations of them upfront, and any consequences of non-compliance (e.g. additional fees for extensions or using rooms other than what they have booked and paid for).
  46. 46. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 2 As a service provider, recognise that many cultures place a much higher emphasis on relationships compared with “task-oriented cultures” such as Australian culture where there’s a stronger emphasis on keeping time commitments. In this scenario, your Pacific Islander or Middles Eastern customer may not be over-extending their room booking out of negligence; instead they may be simply prioritising another relationship (e.g. the enjoyment of their guests) over your rules and procedures. Whilst it is appropriate to make clear your expectations around punctuality, you should still anticipate the likelihood of lateness and consider making contingency plans to mitigate disruptions to other customers. Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  47. 47. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 3 Mitigate future incidents by explaining to new customers problems you’ve had in the past, and provide suggestions to help them meet your rules and procedures e.g. ▪ Suggest they plan to pack up with 10 - 15 mins to spare, in anticipation of an over- run and to ensure the room is vacated on time as per their booking. ▪ Advise them to book additional rooms in advance if they anticipate the need for additional space. This will avoid unplanned booking fees or disappointment. ▪ Inform that you welcome any queries or concerns they wish to discuss in confidence regarding their budget or financial capacity to pay for venue-hire. Following rules & procedures. Influencing Pacific Islanders and Middle Eastern venue-hire customers
  48. 48. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to encourage and help residents from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds who seem reluctant to access community support services and events. Particular reference was made to Indigenous and South Sea Islander people. Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  49. 49. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid judging or assuming that engaging with people from different cultural backgrounds the same as dealing with the general population. Why? You don’t always know how other people prefer to be treated e.g. direct vs diplomatic communication styles; their beliefs around concepts such as mental health; their level of trust in official authority figures etc. 1 Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  50. 50. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Avoid designing programs without consulting community elders. Why? Community elders and leaders can help: ▪ build trust within their local communities to overcome reluctance in accessing your services ▪ identify cultural issues you may be unaware of e.g. a need for female practitioners to service female customers 2 Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  51. 51. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Create a welcoming culture for multicultural residents e.g. ▪ Language assistance / translated brochures or signage ▪ Staff trained in cultural awareness e.g. suspending judgement; adjusting their communication style for people from diverse cultural backgrounds etc. Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  52. 52. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 2 Develop relationships with elders and community leaders. Engage them in your program design, messaging and promotional strategy. Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  53. 53. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 3 Be mindful in many cultures, respect for hierarchy is much more prominent (and often quite different) compared with Australian culture. Applications may include: ▪ Not relying on children to interpret sensitive conversations you have with their non English-speaking parents (e.g. regarding health issues, child safety matters etc) ▪ Acknowledging the role of a family spokesperson (often a male or elderly figure) to speak on behalf of other family members. Do not insist on speaking directly to a woman or child if they indicate their family spokesperson wishes to speak on their behalf. Reluctance. Encouraging multicultural and Indigenous residents to access local support services
  54. 54. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to engage better with Samoan residents, acknowledging the importance of the family unit, significant others, and their carers. Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders
  55. 55. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders Avoid : ▪ Judging Pacific Islanders according to your own cultural world view (e.g. your expectations regarding behaviour) ▪ Excluding family members, significant others, carers when engaging with Pacific Islanders ▪ Emphasising or implying that you’re the sole expert (humility and curiosity about others goes a long way in relationship 1 and trust-building!) ▪ A “silo” mindset or way or working ▪ Being rigid in your approach to problem-solving, following organisational procedures etc. In order to build trust, you may need to adjust your delivery methods to suit other people’s cultural norms (Cont’d on next slide)
  56. 56. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders Why? People from “group-oriented cultures” frequently make important decisions (and discuss important matters) taking into account the group consensus e.g. with family members. Maintaining group harmony is very important in these cultures. 1 It is unreasonable for you to expect important decisions to be made by an individual in the same manner as would happen in Australian culture.
  57. 57. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders 1 Always offer to include family members (or a family spokesperson) in important discussions or when important decisions need to be made.
  58. 58. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders 2 Equip your staff with current information regarding services that might be applicable when engaging with Pacific Islanders, e.g. ▪ Cultural awareness ▪ NGO services ▪ NDIS ▪ Australian Department of Human Services (Centrelink, Medicare etc)
  59. 59. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders 3 Seek the advice of Pacific Islander advocates and people with lived experience within Pacific Islander culture.
  60. 60. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Cultural barriers. Overcoming cultural barriers when engaging with Pacific Islanders 4 Create a welcoming culture for Pacific Islanders in your organisation e.g. by showcasing your culturally diverse workforce, and promoting your culturally- informed services or practices.
  61. 61. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge for community services providers knowing how and where to access Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) resources and locally-based CALD services. Where to start? Accessing CALD resources
  62. 62. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Where to start? Accessing CALD resources As a service provider, avoid staying in your comfort zone! Be curious to understand the underlying needs, wants and motivations of your multicultural customers. Pay special attention to key cultural areas of difference.1
  63. 63. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Where to start? Accessing CALD resources 1 ▪ Build your network* with other organisations that engage with multicultural customers and clients. ▪ Involve others* in your work e.g. utilise Indigenous support. ▪ Familiarise yourself with available CALD resources* and local support services*. *Moreton Bay Regional Council’s Community and Cultural Programs Team is a great starting point!
  64. 64. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of influencing Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) residents to engage with community services within appointed times. Keeping appointments. Influencing multicultural customers to keep within appointed timeslots
  65. 65. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Keeping appointments. Influencing multicultural customers to keep within appointed timeslots When explaining the importance of keeping within appointed timeslots, avoid using language which sounds restrictive / limiting e.g. “you only have a 15-minute timeslot (there are more positive ways of reframing this message). 1 Why? Many cultures place a much higher emphasis on relationships compared with “task-oriented cultures” such as Australian culture where there’s a stronger emphasis on keeping time commitments.
  66. 66. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Keeping appointments. Influencing multicultural customers to keep within appointed timeslots 1 Reframe restrictive / limiting messages with phrases that explain what can be done e.g. “we will have 15 minutes together – it’s important to arrive on time to cover everything we want to achieve”.
  67. 67. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Keeping appointments. Influencing multicultural customers to keep within appointed timeslots 2 Communicate to your customer the value of keeping to appointed timeslots, and emphasise the consequences of not keeping to schedule (i.e. the consequences to them, to other customers, and to you as a service provider).
  68. 68. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Context of the workshop discussion: Workshop participants raised the challenge of how to communicate with Indigenous carers and families about sensitive issues with their children Sensitive conversations. Regarding children of Indigenous families
  69. 69. Sensitive conversations. Regarding children of Indigenous families Avoid directly criticising behaviours you may find challenging. Why? In many cultures, it is inappropriate to use the “direct” communication style that is common in the broader Australian culture. This is particularly so when communicating with elders, leaders and other people of 1 status. In such a situation, a more diplomatic style of communication is preferred. People in these cultures are more attuned to “reading between the lines”, taking into account not just what you say, but also what you don’t say, and the overall context of the conversation (including non- verbal communication).
  70. 70. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved 1 Reframe criticism or deficit-based language with more positive and outcomes-based language. For example, ask the carer, parent or guardian what outcome or change they would like to see for their child. This technique can be truly empowering for the family and demonstrates respect. Sensitive conversations. Regarding children of Indigenous families
  71. 71. Photo courtesy of Moreton Bay Regional Council
  72. 72. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Start with Moreton Bay Regional Council. Council’s Community and Cultural Programs Team have an extensive network of service providers and can refer you to further information and resources, as well as keep you up-to-date with future workshops. Contact details: Call the team on (07) 3205 0555 or email communityprograms@moretonbay.qld.gov.au Join the conversation. Share your ideas, feedback and first-hand experiences by joining our Facebook group “Moreton Bay Cultural Resources Group”. Facebook group page: click on this icon
  73. 73. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Connect with Craig Shim at Alphacrane Intercultural Specialists. If you’d like a similar workshop for your organisation or seeking further intercultural insights, let’s chat. We’re a Queensland-based consultancy specialising in cross-cultural communication and business skills. We are Australia’s only organisation that exclusively uses Scenario-Based Learning in our program design and delivery. Craig’s contact details: LinkedIn: CraigShim craig@Alphacrane.com.au +61 481 387 625 www.alphacrane.com.au @AlphacraneIntercultural
  74. 74. © Copyright 2018 | Alphacrane Pty Ltd | All Rights Reserved Using and sharing this document | Terms and Conditions (Agreement) Alphacrane Pty Ltd grants permission for Users to amend this document to suit individual circumstances, and to share this document with colleagues in the Moreton Bay Region. However, this is subject to the following terms and conditions: ▪ Alphacrane Pty Ltd retains all ownership rights. This includes the right to distribute, modify, adapt, publish, transmit, transfer, sell and reproduce. The User is prohibited from exploiting any content, whether in whole or part of, except where expressly stated. ▪ Alphacrane Pty Ltd retains all intellectual property rights. ▪ The User must preserve our copyright notices as reasonably practicable. ▪ Alphacrane Pty Ltd are the owners and originators of this product. The User must not sub- license this document. The User must not misrepresent this document in any capacity. ▪ The User must obtain the written consent of Alphacrane Pty Ltd to distribute any material contained in the license with any third party. ▪ Advice contained in this document is general advice only. Alphacrane Pty Ltd and Moreton Bay Regional Council does not take liability for the User’s individual objectives, situation or needs. Alphacrane Pty Ltd and Moreton Bay Regional Council assumes no liability from any person who relies on information contained in this document. ▪ This document was written by Craig Shim for and on behalf of Alphacrane Pty Ltd as trustee trading as “Alphacrane Intercultural Specialists”.
  75. 75. CraigShim

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