Technology & Literacy Presentation

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This is a presentation I gave at the Chicago Public Schools Tech Leadership Summit.

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  • This session will highlight the ways that technology can be used to strengthen literacy instruction and how school leaders\ncan become change agents in their school’s approach to literacy instruction. If technology is used in classrooms, it is vital\nthat the leadership understand its purpose and advocate for its use. Participants will leave with a better understanding of how technology can be an integral part of instructional planning.\n
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  • This is a game between two teams of nine players each, under direction of a \nmanager, played on an enclosed field in accordance with these rules, under jurisdiction of \none or more officials. The objective of each team is to win by scoring more runs than the opponent. The winner of the game shall be that team which shall have scored, in accordance \nwith these rules, the greater number of runs at the conclusion of a regulation game. \n\nTrying to apply rules of print materials to Internet materials is like trying to play basketball with baseball rules!\n
  • http://fcit.usf.edu/matrix/resources.php\n\nUse student examples to showcase TIM domains (make meaning of the chart)\n\nCreate ‘cards’ that have activities of tech integration = have them map to the TIM\nDiscuss how the 21st century room and workplace (life) lives in the higher end\n\n-models of tech integration- \n-Change agent after this-\n
  • A 5th grade lesson is using the highly-engaging PREZI website to deliver multimedia instruction about the French-Indian war. The lesson shows some some primary sources and the class uses this to reflect on what life back then might have been like.\n
  • Students are recording themselves reading using iPads at a center. Students then replay the recording and reflect on their use of inflection, pausing at punctuation, and sounding out words.The teacher can listen to the recording and confer with the students about their own fluency. Students can rerecord the passage to increase their fluency.\n\n\nStudents are using the adaptive software Achieve 3000 that provides differentiated text at their instructional reading level. All students in the classroom have laptops and are each using the program at their individual level.\n\n\n
  • Students in a 6th grade classroom are creating PSAs (public service announcements). Students create a timeline for their project and write a script using Power Point for cue cards.Students film their PSA, import it to iMovie and edit if needed. Students burn it to a DVD and it is used in the morning announcement at the school. Students will import their footage to iMovie.\n\n\n
  • An upper grade classroom has groups brainstorm essential questions to investigate during research. They conduct research on one planet and identify the key areas of focus for their presentation. Groups then write a script based on their synthesis of key areas of focus and create either a podcast or video using the computer or a camera. Groups then post their work on iTunes U if possible, or a class website.\n\n\n
  • Students in an intermediate classroom are researching about ‘race’ using primary documents. They then create a blog post from the perspective of someone in history who experienced prejudice. Students comment on each other’s blogs. They then use Google Earth to create a tour of some historic places throughout the world where racism was strong and present their findings from their research using a tool of their choice. \n
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  • There are standards that can be enriched through the use of technology and there are standards that address technology specifically. These are the latter. \n
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  • 1. Intervention classes: Technology is integrated into every intervention class period.\n2. Change management leadership by principal: Leaders provide time for teacher professional learning and collaboration at least monthly.\n3. Online collaboration: Students use technology daily for online collaboration (games/simulations and social media).\n4. Core subjects: Technology is integrated into core curriculum weekly or more frequently.\n5. Online formative assessments: Assessments are done at least weekly.\n6. Student-computer ratio: Lower ratios improve outcomes.\n7. Virtual field trips:With more frequent use, virtual trips are more powerful. The best schools do these at least monthly.\n8. Search engines: Students use daily.\n9. Principal training: Principals are trained in teacher buy-in, best practices, and technology-transformed learning.\n\nhttp://www.projectred.org/\n\n\n
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  • MLK example .org?\n
  • MLK example .org?\n
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  • Have students try a set of similar searches, modifying punctuation, capitalization, and word order. \n\nDiscuss the outcomes of these searches with students. \n\nFindings can be collected and written on the board, and compared to the generalizations on [Slide #8].\n
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  • The premise for this design comes from the history of conflicts between China and Tibet. The focus is on one particular account that shows a glimpse of the level of China’s tyranny and atrocity and depth of incivility and inhumanity. In 1995, 6 year-old Gedhun Choekyi Nyima was named the 11th Panchen Lama. Days after his selection he was seized by government officials and in his place the People’s Republic of China named Gyancain Norbu as Panchen Lama. Gedhun Choekyi Nyima hasn’t been seen since. On the right side, you’ll see the silhouette of a robed-monk child who represents Gedhun.\n
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  • Time and place for adaptive software but make it purposeful and functional. PULL SMALL GROUPS!!\n
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  • Technology & Literacy Presentation

    1. 1. Welcome LITERACY & TECHNOLOGY ROB RESIDORI ED TECH DEPARTMENT CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS
    2. 2. Overview• Making the Case• School-wide Level• Classroom Level
    3. 3. Join the Chat!#cpstt@rresidori
    4. 4. In#2005,#students#aged#8018# spent#48#minutes#per#day# reading#on#the#Internet...#...and#only#43#minutes#per#day#reading#offline.### Interna;onal#Reading#Associa;on,#
    5. 5. Rules of the Game
    6. 6. Levels of Technology Integration into the Curriculum Entry Adoption Adaptation Infusion TransformationChar Active Information Conventional, Conventional Choice of tools Extensive andacte passively procedural use independent use and regular, unconventionalristi received of tools of tools; some self-directed use of toolscs of student choice use and exploration theLear Collaborative Individual Collaborative Collaborative Choice of tools Collaborationning student use of use of tools in use of tools; and regular use with peers andEnvir tools conventional some student for outsideonm ways choice and collaboration resources in ent exploration ways notCharacteristics of the Learning Environment possible without technology Constructive Information Guided, Independent use Choice and Extensive and delivered to conventional for building regular use for unconventional students use for building knowledge; building use of knowledge some student knowledge technology choice and tools to build exploration knowledge Authentic Use unrelated to Guided use in Independent use Choice of tools Innovative use the world activities with in activities and regular use for higher order outside of the some connected to in meaningful learning instructional meaningful students lives; activities activities in a setting context some student local or global choice and context exploration Goal-Directed Directions given, Conventional Purposeful use Flexible and Extensive and step-by-step and procedural of tools to plan seamless use of higher order use task monitoring use of tools to and monitor; tools to plan of tools to plan plan or monitor some student and monitor and monitor choice and exploration
    7. 7. ENTRYAt the Entry level, typically the teacher uses technologyto deliver curriculum content to students. Entry levelactivities may include listening to or watching contentdelivered through technology or working on activitiesdesigned to build fluency with basic facts or skills,such as drill-and-practice exercises. In a lesson thatincludes technology use at the Entry level, the studentsmay not have direct access to the technology.Decisions about how and when to use technology toolsas well as which tools to use are made by the teacher.
    8. 8. ADOPTIONAt the Adoption level, technology tools are used inconventional ways. The teacher makes decisions aboutwhich technology tool to use and when and how to useit. Students exposure to individual technology toolsmay be limited to single types of tasks that involve aprocedural understanding.
    9. 9. ADAPTATIONAt the Adaptation level, the teacher incorporatestechnology tools as an integral part of the lesson. Whilethe teacher makes most decisions about technologyuse, the teacher guides the students in theindependent use of technology tools. Students have agreater familiarity with the use of technology tools andhave a more conceptual understanding of the toolsthan students at the Adoption level. They are able towork without direct procedural instruction from theteacher and begin to explore different ways of usingthe technology tools.
    10. 10. INFUSIONAt the Infusion level, a range of different technologytools are integrated flexibly and seamlessly into theclassroom. Technology is available in sufficientquantities to meet the needs of all students. Studentsare able to make informed decisions about when andhow to use different tools. The instructional focus is onstudent learning and not on the technology toolsthemselves. For this reason, Infusion level worktypically occurs after teachers and students haveexperience with a particular technology tool. Theteacher guides students to make decisions about whenand how to use technology.
    11. 11. TRANSFORMATIONAt the Transformation level, students use technology toolsflexibly to achieve specific learning outcomes. The students havea conceptual understanding of the tools coupled with extensivepractical knowledge about their use. Students apply thatunderstanding and knowledge, and students may extend the useof technology tools. They are encouraged to use technologytools in unconventional ways and are self-directed in combiningthe use of various tools. The teacher serves as a guide, mentor,and model in the use of technology. At this level, technologytools are often used to facilitate higher order learning activitiesthat would not otherwise have been possible, or would havebeen difficult to accomplish without the use of technology.
    12. 12. Students Who are College and Career Readyin Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and LanguageThe descriptions that follow are not standards themselves but instead offer a portrait of students who meet the standards set out in this document. As studentsadvance through the grades and master the standards in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language, they are able to exhibit with increasing fullness andregularity these capacities of the literate individual.They demonstrate independence. They comprehend as well as critique.Students can, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate Students are engaged and open-minded—but discerning—readers and listeners.complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and they can construct They work diligently to understand precisely what an author or speaker iseffective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information. Likewise, saying, but they also question an author’s or speaker’s assumptions andstudents are able independently to discern a speaker’s key points, request premises and assess the veracity of claims and the soundness of reasoning.clarification, and ask relevant questions. They build on others’ ideas, articulatetheir own ideas, and confirm they have been understood. Without prompting,they demonstrate command of standard English and acquire and use a They value evidence.wide-ranging vocabulary. More broadly, they become self-directed learners, Students cite specific evidence when offering an oral or written interpretationeffectively seeking out and using resources to assist them, including teachers, of a text. They use relevant evidence when supporting their own points inpeers, and print and digital reference materials. writing and speaking, making their reasoning clear to the reader or listener, and they constructively evaluate others’ use of evidence.They build strong content knowledge.Students establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter They use technology and digital media strategically and capably.by engaging with works of quality and substance. They become proficient Students employ technology thoughtfully to enhance their reading, writing,in new areas through research and study. They read purposefully and listen speaking, listening, and language use. They tailor their searches online toattentively to gain both general knowledge and discipline-specific expertise. acquire useful information efficiently, and they integrate what they learn usingThey refine and share their knowledge through writing and speaking. technology with what they learn offline. They are familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools and mediums and can select and useThey respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, those best suited to their communication goals.and discipline. They come to understand other perspectives and cultures.Students adapt their communication in relation to audience, task, purpose, anddiscipline. They set and adjust purpose for reading, writing, speaking, listening, Students appreciate that the twenty-first-century classroom and workplaceand language use as warranted by the task. They appreciate nuances, such as are settings in which people from often widely divergent cultures and whohow the composition of an audience should affect tone when speaking and represent diverse experiences and perspectives must learn and work together.how the connotations of words affect meaning. They also know that different Students actively seek to understand other perspectives and cultures throughdisciplines call for different types of evidence (e.g., documentary evidence in reading and listening, and they are able to communicate effectively withhistory, experimental evidence in science). people of varied backgrounds. They evaluate other points of view critically and constructively. Through reading great classic and contemporary works of literature representative of a variety of periods, cultures, and worldviews, students can vicariously inhabit worlds and have experiences much different than their own.
    13. 13. they constructively evaluate others’ use of evidence.They use technology and digital media strategically and capably.Students employ technology thoughtfully to enhance their reading, writing,speaking, listening, and language use. They tailor their searches online toacquire useful information efficiently, and they integrate what they learn usingtechnology with what they learn offline. They are familiar with the strengths andlimitations of various technological tools and mediums and can select and usethose best suited to their communication goals.They come to understand other perspectives and cultures.Students appreciate that the twenty-first-century classroom and workplaceare settings in which people from often widely divergent cultures and whorepresent diverse experiences and perspectives must learn and work together.Students actively seek to understand other perspectives and cultures throughreading and listening, and they are able to communicate effectively withpeople of varied backgrounds. They evaluate other points of view criticallyand constructively. Through reading great classic and contemporary worksof literature representative of a variety of periods, cultures, and worldviews,students can vicariously inhabit worlds and have experiences much differentthan their own.
    14. 14. Kindergarten/1 st GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting 1.6 1. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. 1. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or informationSpeaking/ presented orally or through other media by asking andListening 1.2 answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.Speaking/ 2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text readListening 1.2 aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
    15. 15. 2 nd GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RL 2.7 1. Use information gained from illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characteristics, setting, or plot.Reading RI 2.5 2. Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently. 3. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digitalWriting 2.6 tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. 4. Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloudSpeaking/ or information presented orally or through other media.Listening 2.2 5. Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words andLanguage 2.4 phrases.
    16. 16. 3 rd GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RI3.5 1. Use text features and search tools (e.g. key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.Writing W3.6 2. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. 3. Recall information from experiences or gather informationWriting W3.8 from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. 4. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media andSpeaking/ formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.Listening SL3.2
    17. 17. 4 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RI4.7 1. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g. in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. 2. Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic andWriting W4.6 convey ideas and information in paragraphs and sections: include formation (e.g. headings) illustrations, and multimedia when useful in aiding comprehension with some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single setting.
    18. 18. 4 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting W4.8 3. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information and provide a list of sources. 4. Consult reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries,Language L4.4 thesauruses) both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. 5. Interpret information presented visually, orally orReading RI4.7 quantitatively (e.g. in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
    19. 19. 5 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RL5.7 1. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g. graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). 2. Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic andWriting W5.2 convey ideas and information clearly. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g. headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful in aiding comprehension. 3. With some guidance and support from adults, use technologyWriting W5.6 including the Internet to produce and publish writing as well as to interact an collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single setting.
    20. 20. 5 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting W5.8 4. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.Speaking/ 5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) andListening SL5.5 visual display in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. 6. Consult reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries,Language L5.4 thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases
    21. 21. 6 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RI.6.7 1. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.Reading RI.6-8.7 2. Integrate visual information (e.g. in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.Reading Science/ 3. Compare and contrast the information gained fromTech experiments, simulations, videos, or multimedia sourcesRST 6-8.9 with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.
    22. 22. 6 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting W.6.2 4. Write informative/ explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g. headings) graphics (e.g. charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.Writing W6.6 5. Use technology including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently.Writing W6.8 6. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility an accuracy of each source; an quote or paraphrase the date and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
    23. 23. 6 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardSpeaking/ 7. Include multimedia components (e.g. graphics, images,Listening SL.6.5 music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.Language L.6.4 8. Consult reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses) both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
    24. 24. 7 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RI.7.7 1. Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g. how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).Language L.7.4 2. Consult general and specialize reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses) both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.Speaking/Listening SL.7.5 3. Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.Language L7.4 4. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
    25. 25. 7 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting W.7.6 5. Use technology including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
    26. 26. 8 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardReading RI.8.7 1. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g. print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea.Language L.8.4 2. Consult general and specialize reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses) both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.Speaking/Listening SL.8.5 3. Integrate multimedia components and visual displays to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.Language L8.4 4. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g. dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
    27. 27. 8 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting WHST 5. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital6-8.8 sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility an accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. 6. Use technology including the Internet, to produce andWriting W.8.6 publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others. 7. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow;Writing W.8.2 organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories, include formatting (e.g. headings) graphics (e.g. charts and tables), and multimedia when useful, aiding in comprehension.
    28. 28. 9 th & 10 th GradeELA CCSS Strand StandardWriting W.9-10.2 1. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g. headings), graphics (e.g. charts and tables) and multimedia when useful aiding comprehension. 2. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in differentReading mediums (e.g. a person’s life story in both print andRI.9-10.7 multimedia), determining which entails are emphasized in each account. 3. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish,Writing 9-10.6 and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
    29. 29. 9 th & 10 th GradeELA CCSS StandardStrandWriting 4. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print andW.9-10.8 digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.Speaking/ 5. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverseListening media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluatingSL9-10.2 the credibility and accuracy of each source.SL9-10.5 6. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g. textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.Reading 7. Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g. charts, researchRH9-10.7 data) with qualitative analysis in print and digital texts.
    30. 30. 11 th & 12 th GradeELA CCSS StandardStrandWriting 1. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish,W.11-12.6 and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. 2. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of informationReading presented in diverse formats and media (e.g. quantitative data,RI.11-12.7 video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. 3. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverseSpeaking/ media or formats (e.g. visually, quantitatively, orally)Listening evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.SL11-12.2
    31. 31. 11 th & 12 th GradeELA CCSS StandardStrandWriting 4. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print andW.11-12.8 digital sources, use advance searches effectively; assess strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.WritingW.11-12.2 5. Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts and information clearly an accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each element builds on that which proceeds it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g. headings) graphics (e.g. charts and tables), and multimedia when useful for aiding in comprehension.
    32. 32. Change
    33. 33. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    34. 34. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    35. 35. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    36. 36. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    37. 37. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    38. 38. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    39. 39. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan Action Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    40. 40. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan ActionFrustration Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    41. 41. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan ActionFrustration Vision Skills Incentives Plan Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    42. 42. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan ActionFrustration Vision Skills Incentives Plan Treadmill Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    43. 43. ActionChange Vision Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Confusion Skills Incentives Resources Plan Action Anxiety Vision Incentives Resources Plan ActionResistance Vision Skills Resources Plan ActionFrustration Vision Skills Incentives Plan Treadmill Vision Skills Incentives Resources
    44. 44. Nine KIFs Linked to Success• Intervention classes • Online formative assessments• Change management leadership by principal • Student-device ratio• Online collaboration • Virtual field trips• Core subjects • Search Engines • Principal training
    45. 45. Integration Domains Technology as a topic Technology as a tool
    46. 46. Consumption
    47. 47. Critical Consumption• Use appropriate technology and methods to evaluation the credibility of networked information
    48. 48. Writing Standard 7.8Gather relevant information frommultiple print and digital sources,using search terms effectively; assessthe credibility and accuracy of eachsource; and quote or paraphrase thedata and conclusions of others whileavoiding plagiarism and following astandard format for citation.
    49. 49. Mr. Residoris class is devoted to the preservation of endangered species. We arecurrently creating a Web site about unusual and endangered animals to educatepeople.We need your help! Can you tell us what information we should include about thePacific Northwest Tree Octopus at our Web page?First, find this site: Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. Explore the links tolearn more about this animal. You may do other research, too.Then:Summarize the most important information that people should know about treeoctopuses. Write 1-2 sentences and send it to us. We will use this at our Web site toeducate people about this animal.Tell us if the information at the site, Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus, isvery reliable, somewhat reliable, or not at all reliable.Please give at least THREE reasons for your answer. Describe the thinking andinformation that you used to make your decision.
    50. 50. What Matters In My Search Query?Think of a topic or question you would like to search for.Pick three or four keywords to use in your search query.What happens if you reorder them? Add capitalization orpunctuation? What if you take out a word?
    51. 51. 1 Every Word Matters Try searching for [who], [the who], and [a who]2 Order Matters Try searching for [blue sky] and [sky blue]3 Capitalization does not matter. Try searching for [barack obama] and [Barack Obama]4 Punctuation does not matter. Try searching for [red: delicious! Apple?] and [red delicious apple]* There are some exceptions
    52. 52. technology as a tool
    53. 53. Authentic Audience
    54. 54. lit stories
    55. 55. Social Networking Tools
    56. 56. Digital Storytelling Social Networking Tools
    57. 57. Digital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype
    58. 58. Digital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Classroom websites
    59. 59. Digital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Classroom websites Creation Tools - Animation, Comic Strips, ebooks,
    60. 60. Digital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Classroom websites Multimedia Tools Creation Tools - Animation, Comic Strips, ebooks,
    61. 61. Models and simulationsDigital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Classroom websites Multimedia Tools Creation Tools - Animation, Comic Strips, ebooks,
    62. 62. Models and simulationsDigital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Presentation Tools Classroom websites Multimedia Tools Creation Tools - Animation, Comic Strips, ebooks,
    63. 63. Models and simulationsDigital Storytelling Social Networking Tools Online collaboration tools - Edmodo, Skype Presentation Tools Content Deepening Tools Classroom websites Multimedia Tools Creation Tools - Animation, Comic Strips, ebooks,
    64. 64. ModelsFlipped Learning
    65. 65. Flipped Learning Instruction sent home Opens up class time Little tech needed
    66. 66. Blended Learning Group with ComputersGroup with Teacher Small work Groups
    67. 67. How can you help?
    68. 68. network!!Observations!
    69. 69. THANK YOU RJRESIDORI@CPS.EDU @RRESIDORI ON TWITTERhttp://farm1.staticflickr.com/103/285112924_d83e63d992_b_d.jpg,http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs13/f/2007/085/b/8/Transparent_PNG_RSS_logo_by_TarnicDotCom.pnghttp://wiredtogrow.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/tools.pnghttp://educatorstudio.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/blog_image/FlippedClassroom.jpghttp://www.ourladyofhungary.com/cc/GoogleEarth/google-earth-5-screenshot.pnghttp://farm3.static.flickr.com/2279/2247117731_77c48b34af_b_d.jpghttp://www.esf.be/new/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/logo_twitter_withbird_1000_allblue.png http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6006/5972642009_f7901a268f_b_d.jpghttp://farm7.staticflickr.com/6157/6174688366_2019404d48_b_d.jpg

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