Aligning Course Outcomes, Course Instruction, and Course Assessments Part 1 of 3

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Aligning Outcomes, Instruction, and Assessment (3 trainings). There is an entire field dedicated to the science of instruction. This training will provide the tools to review your existing courses to see if they are following the best practices of planning, delivering, and assessing learning outcomes of your course. Visit www.courseoutcomes.com to learn more.

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Aligning Course Outcomes, Course Instruction, and Course Assessments Part 1 of 3

  1. 1. In April 2011, The CPE PhD, LLC became Course Outcomes, LLC. The training materials are referred to in this packet are owned and copyrighted by Course Outcomes, LLC and can only be used for free trainings. They may not be rebranded nor sold without express written permission from Course Outcomes. <br />Course Outcomes and The CPE PhD<br />
  2. 2. Thank you for using The CPE PhD’s training services. The content of this training is copyrighted by The CPE PhD and may not be resold, repackaged, or printed for profit. Organization Members may download and repackage materials for their organization but not for profit without express written permission from The CPE PhD.<br />Intro Slide<br />
  3. 3. Managing Director’s Message<br />An introduction to hour 1: General instructional <br />objectives and specific learner outcomes<br />
  4. 4. Overview Plan<br />Basic Course Development<br />
  5. 5. Establish clearly what you want those enrolled in the course to know, feel, and/or do as a result of taking the course.<br />Step 1<br />
  6. 6. Develop an assessment plan <br /> Pre-assessment, post-assessment, assessments during the course, assessment for learning.<br /> Certification (cut-score, competency)<br /> Norm-reference or criterion-reference<br /> Performance assessment<br /> Self-assessment<br />Step 2<br />
  7. 7. Develop assessments that produce evidence from which you can conclude that those enrolled in the course know, feel, and/or do that which is expected by course end (i.e., targeted learning outcomes).<br />Step 3<br />
  8. 8. With the targeted learning outcomes as a guide, prepare a curriculum that sequences the course in a way that builds student knowledge and/or skills in an incremental fashion. <br />Step 4<br />
  9. 9. Pilot test the course and the assessments to evaluate the degree to which the course achieves its objective.<br />Step 5<br />
  10. 10. Course Objectives and Specific Learning Outcomes<br />Part I<br />
  11. 11. Purpose of this Training<br />In order for a course to receive accreditation from the majority of accrediting organizations the following evidence must be provided:<br /><ul><li>The learning outcomes of the course
  12. 12. Evidence that the objectives, instruction, and testing are aligned.
  13. 13. Evidence that learning outcomes are being achieved.</li></ul>Armed with this information the accrediting body compares the evidence provided with those from other comparable courses. A determination is then made regarding whether or not the course receives accreditation. <br />
  14. 14. Purpose of this Training<br />The purpose of this training is to familiarize you with a standard vocabulary that communicates the learning outcomes of the courses you teach.<br />This will make it possible to demonstrate evidence that - <br /><ul><li>the objectives, instruction, and testing are aligned.
  15. 15. learning outcomes are being achieved.</li></li></ul><li>Part 1 – Objectives & Outcomes<br />Part 2 – Assessment Blueprint<br />Part 3 – Instruction and Assessment<br />Training Outline<br />
  16. 16. Objectives & Outcomes<br />Part 1<br />
  17. 17. Dental Hygienist Training Accounting<br /> Police Academy<br /> Examples in this course come from…<br />
  18. 18. Course objectives serve as guides for –<br /> instruction<br /> learning<br /> assessment <br />Course Objective<br />
  19. 19. A course objective is a statement of general student performance that is a result of course instruction.<br />For example, a dental hygienist program could have the following course objectives:<br />Students will - <br /><ul><li> develop psychomotor skills for general assistant duties
  20. 20. understand American Dental Association standards
  21. 21. apply best practices to x-ray tooth decay</li></ul>Notice the general nature of these statements.<br />What is a course objective?<br />
  22. 22. General Instructional Objectives<br />For purposes of this training we will call your objectives <br />
  23. 23. The General Instructional Objectives should-<br />cover core content areas<br />cover general areas of student performance<br />serve as a heading for Specific Learning Outcomes<br />Other Guidelines<br />
  24. 24. Specific Learning Outcomes<br />Note – the SLO is written in terms of specific student performance<br />Each General Instructional Objective (GIO) is defined in more detail by Specific Learning Outcomes (SLO). <br />For example , an accounting course on SOX legislation may have the following GIO and SLOs– <br />GIO – Understand key sections and titles of SOX <br />SLO – distinguish between examples and nonexamples of conflicts of interest.<br />SLO – Identify the principles underlying codes of conduct.<br />SLO – Explain the key components of whistleblower protection.<br />Note – this example is provided to illustrate the relationship between GIOs and SLOs. <br />That is related to the GIO<br />Content experts are in a better position to write effective GIOs and SLOs for courses dealing with Sarbanes-Oxley legislation.<br />
  25. 25. The Dos and Don’ts of Writing Specific Learning Outcomes<br />
  26. 26. The biggest “Do” is that you should write your specific learning outcomes in terms of what students in the course should be able to “do”, “perform”, or “demonstrate” as a result of your instruction.<br />Do(s)<br />
  27. 27. Don’t state SLOs in terms of – <br />Teacher performance (e.g., “Teach police crowd control)<br />Learning process (e.g., “Student learns best practices for DUI arrests)<br />Course content (e.g., “Student studiescase-studies of high-speed chase effectiveness)<br />Don’t(s)<br />
  28. 28. Each GIO and SLO begins with an action verb. <br />GIOs tend to use more general verbs such as <br />knows<br />understands<br />demonstrates<br />applies<br />relates<br />Note - <br />
  29. 29. <ul><li>recognize
  30. 30. recall
  31. 31. exemplify
  32. 32. infer
  33. 33. compare
  34. 34. explain
  35. 35. implement
  36. 36. organize
  37. 37. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Let us examine the type of assessment questions (items) that are designed to produce evidence of student performance associated with these verbs<br />Then state the specific learning outcome that is being assessed by each item.<br />
  38. 38. <ul><li>recognize
  39. 39. recall
  40. 40. exemplify
  41. 41. infer
  42. 42. compare
  43. 43. explain
  44. 44. implement
  45. 45. organize
  46. 46. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />On what date was the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation passed?<br />June 24, 2001<br />October 23, 2003<br />January 3, 2005<br />December 4, 2008<br />SLO – Students will be able to identifyspecific dates and events surrounding the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation.<br />Notice with this item the student simply searches their memory for the correct date and then selects from the options that best match from what they remember.<br />
  47. 47. <ul><li>recognize
  48. 48. recall
  49. 49. exemplify
  50. 50. infer
  51. 51. compare
  52. 52. explain
  53. 53. implement
  54. 54. organize
  55. 55. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />The Sarbanes-Oxley legislation was passed on what date? ______________<br />SLO – Students will be able to recall specific dates and events surrounding the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation.<br />Notice with this item the student searches their memory for the correct date and then supplies it rather than selecting from options.<br />
  56. 56. <ul><li>recognize
  57. 57. recall
  58. 58. exemplify
  59. 59. infer
  60. 60. compare
  61. 61. explain
  62. 62. implement
  63. 63. organize
  64. 64. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Which case study below is an effective example of x-raying tooth decay?<br />a. Case study 1<br />b. Case study 2<br />c. Case study 3<br />d. Case study 4<br />SLO – Students will be able to identify examples of effective x-ray practices for tooth decay .<br />With this item a respondent would have to - <br /><ul><li> first know the features of effective x-raying for tooth decay.
  65. 65. second be able to identify those features in a case study.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>recognize
  66. 66. recall
  67. 67. exemplify
  68. 68. infer
  69. 69. compare
  70. 70. explain
  71. 71. implement
  72. 72. organize
  73. 73. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Respondent reads a scenario depicting a less effective way of x-raying tooth decay with failed results.<br />What guideline below, if followed, could have made this way of x-raying tooth decay more effective? <br />a. Guideline 1<br />b. Guideline 2<br />c. Guideline 3<br />d. Guideline 4<br />SLO – Students will be able to infer the reason why the results of an x-ray of tooth decay failed.<br />The respondent in this case would need to be able to (1) detect the less effective aspect of the scenario, (2) make an inference as to which guideline was not followed. <br />
  74. 74. <ul><li>recognize
  75. 75. recall
  76. 76. exemplify
  77. 77. infer
  78. 78. compare
  79. 79. explain
  80. 80. implement
  81. 81. organize
  82. 82. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Respondent reads two scenarios depicting different white-collar crimes that would receive the same penalty.<br />Would these white-collar crimes be subjected to the same or different penalties?<br />a. Same penalty<br />b. Different penalties<br />SLO – Students will be able to identify penalties associated with certain white-collar crimes.<br />The respondent would need to know the penalties associated with each crime and determine if they are the same.<br />
  83. 83. <ul><li>recognize
  84. 84. recall
  85. 85. exemplify
  86. 86. infer
  87. 87. compare
  88. 88. explain
  89. 89. implement
  90. 90. organize
  91. 91. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Respondent reads a case study of a significant account. <br />For what reason would the account above be considered significant.<br />a. Reason #1<br />b. Reason #2<br />c. Reason #3<br />d. Reason #4<br />e. The account is not significant<br />SLO – Students will recognize what makes an account significant.<br />Respondent knows the reasons an account is considered significant and checks to see which of those reasons applies to this case study. <br />
  92. 92. <ul><li>recognize
  93. 93. recall
  94. 94. exemplify
  95. 95. infer
  96. 96. compare
  97. 97. explain
  98. 98. implement
  99. 99. organize
  100. 100. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Respondent reads a case study they’ve never seen before depicting a challenging crowd control scenario with no clear-cut solution. <br />Select the option below that represents the best way to handle this situation<br />a. Procedure #1<br />b. Procedure #2<br />c. Procedure #3<br />d. Procedure #4<br />SLO – Students will recognize appropriate implementation of procedures for crowd control.<br />Respondent matches the challenge with a combination of procedures that could resolve this ill-defined challenge.<br />
  101. 101. <ul><li>recognize
  102. 102. recall
  103. 103. exemplify
  104. 104. infer
  105. 105. compare
  106. 106. explain
  107. 107. implement
  108. 108. organize
  109. 109. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Below are elements that are required in a DUI arrest.<br /><ul><li> Element 1
  110. 110. Element 2
  111. 111. Element 3
  112. 112. Element 4</li></ul>Rank order these elements based on their importance in making a DUI arrest.<br />a. 3, 4, 2, 1,<br />b. 3, 1, 2, 4<br />c. 2, 3, 4, 1<br />d. 4, 3, 2, 1<br />SLO – Students will be able to organize elements of a DUI arrest based on level of importance.<br />Respondent determines the importance of each element and then organizes them based on a magnitude of importance.<br />
  113. 113. <ul><li>recognize
  114. 114. recall
  115. 115. exemplify
  116. 116. infer
  117. 117. compare
  118. 118. explain
  119. 119. implement
  120. 120. organize
  121. 121. critique</li></ul>SLOs tend to use more specific verbs such as -<br />Respondent reads a case study where a code of conduct has been breached and then how it is was officially dealt with.<br />Select from the list below all of the criteria that should be used to evaluate the effectiveness of how this situation was dealt with.<br />a. Criterion #1<br />b. Criterion #2<br />c. Criterion #3<br />d. Criterion #4<br />SLO – Students will recognize appropriate implementation of ethical procedures <br />Respondent critiques the method for dealing with the breach and then selects the criteria from the options listed below that best matches his/her critique. <br />
  122. 122. GIOs represent all of the content in your course at a general level. <br />Sometimes many and sometimes a few SLOs can serve to produce detailed evidence that a GIO has been achieved.<br />Theoretically you could write an infinite number of SLOs under each GIO and then sample from that list a smaller number of SLOs to write test questions to.<br />Constructing GIOs and SLOs<br />
  123. 123. Here is a visual example - <br />GIO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />
  124. 124. Here is a visual example - <br />GIO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />By assessing students’ ability to achieve these three SLOs<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />
  125. 125. Here is a visual example - <br />GIO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />we are inferring that they would perform the same on the rest.<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />SLO<br />
  126. 126. Write General Instructional Objectives (GIOs) that cover your entire course material and what students should be able to do with the material. <br />(e.g., Understand best practices for COSO/IT internal control documentation)<br />As a result of this training, you should be able to…<br />
  127. 127. Write General Instructional Objectives (GIOs) that cover your entire course material and what students should be able to do with the material. <br />(e.g., Understand best practices for COSO/IT internal control documentation)<br />As a result of this training, you should be able to…<br />
  128. 128. Write General Instructional Objectives (GIOs) that cover your entire course material and what students should be able to do with the material. <br />(e.g., Understand best practices for COSO/IT internal control documentation)<br />As a result of this training, you should be able to…<br />
  129. 129. Write General Instructional Objectives (GIOs) that cover your entire course material and what students should be able to do with the material. <br />(e.g., Understand best practices for COSO/IT internal control documentation)<br />Write corresponding Specific Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for each of your GIOs. <br />As a result of this training, you should be able to…<br />
  130. 130. If you have any questions or need assistance check the discussion board or contact Dr. Daniel Winder at the cpephd@gmail.com<br />

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