Poetry Party   By Carole Parsons  5/10/2007
SC 5th Grade Standards  <ul><ul><ul><li>5-1.7  Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for exampl...
Chap Books <ul><li>During the Middle Ages, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, English booksellers would trave...
Illuminated Letters <ul><li>Since illuminated letters were popular during the middle ages, use at least one on the cover o...
Poetry Book  Table of Contents <ul><li>Haiku (2)……………………………………………………………….. </li></ul><ul><li>Cinquain (2)……………………………………………...
Appendix <ul><li>Refrain : a passage repeated at regular intervals, usually in a poem or song. </li></ul><ul><li>Repetitio...
Auto Bio Poem <ul><li>Line 1:  Your first name  Nancy </li></ul><ul><li>Line 2:  Four descriptive traits  Honest, caring, ...
Haiku  <ul><li>Formal Japanese Haiku is usually light and delicate in feeling and is concerned with something lovely in na...
Haiku  <ul><li>Loud, crashing thunder </li></ul><ul><li>And then the rain pouring down </li></ul><ul><li>The rainbow appea...
Your Own Haiku  <ul><li>1  2  3  4  5 </li></ul><ul><li>Hanging from a branch </li></ul><ul><li>1  2  3  4  5  6  7 </li><...
Multiple Voice  <ul><li>Two-voice poetry is written for two people to perform. The poetry has two columns – one for each p...
Multiple Voice 2 <ul><li>Just like all poetry, poems for two voices need an idea. </li></ul><ul><li>Nature makes great sub...
Multiple Voice 3 <ul><li>Need More Structure?  Try this… </li></ul><ul><li>Divide a paper by drawing a line in the middle ...
Cinquain 1 <ul><li>The modern cinquain is based on a word count of words of a certain type. </li></ul><ul><li>line 1 - one...
<ul><li>Triangles </li></ul><ul><li>pointy edges </li></ul><ul><li>revolving, rotating, angling </li></ul><ul><li>Triangle...
Diamante` 1 <ul><li>Diamond-shaped poems that use nouns and adjectives to describe either one central topic or two opposin...
Diamante` 2 <ul><li>Caterpillar, </li></ul><ul><li>Fuzzy, tickly, </li></ul><ul><li>Eating, crawling, metamorphosing, </li...
Diamante` 3 <ul><li>Line 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Li...
Cause and Effect <ul><li>The Spelling Test </li></ul><ul><li>Study </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge, Dedication </li></ul><ul><...
Cause and Effect <ul><li>Spring Showers </li></ul><ul><li>Sprinkling </li></ul><ul><li>Cool, Clean </li></ul><ul><li>Renew...
Concrete Poetry 1 <ul><li>Concrete poetry involves arranging the letters or words that describe an object into a visual im...
Concrete Poetry 2 <ul><li>Is written in the shape of the topic of the poem.  Rhyme is not important in concrete poetry. </...
Concrete 3
<ul><li>One way to get started: </li></ul><ul><li>Think of a food you like to eat. </li></ul><ul><li>List many different w...
Concrete 5
Concrete 11
Concrete 7
Concrete 8
Concrete 9
Concrete 10
Color Poetry  <ul><li>How do you know color? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you know it best because you have seen it? </li></ul><ul...
Hailstones and Halibut Bones <ul><li>The colors live </li></ul><ul><li>Between black and white </li></ul><ul><li>In a land...
<ul><li>Chartreuse is... the color of spring. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is... renewal. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is....
<ul><li>Green is go, </li></ul><ul><li>And red is stop, </li></ul><ul><li>And yellow is peaches </li></ul><ul><li>With cre...
<ul><li>We could learn a lot  </li></ul><ul><li>from crayons: </li></ul><ul><li>Some are sharp, some are dull, </li></ul><...
<ul><li>What is pink?  A rose is pink </li></ul><ul><li>By the fountain’s brink. </li></ul><ul><li>What is red?  A poppy’s...
What Your Favorite Color  Tells About You <ul><li>Marketing experts use color psychology to help sell products- ever notic...
Color Test <ul><li>Light blue: creative, perceptive, imaginative </li></ul><ul><li>Dark blue: intelligent, responsible </l...
The colors you wear can have a psychological impact.  This is important if you are trying to “dress for success.”  Here ar...
<ul><li>Indigo </li></ul><ul><li>Cerise </li></ul><ul><li>Puce </li></ul><ul><li>Slate </li></ul><ul><li>Crimson </li></ul...
Color Poetry <ul><li>  (selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected col...
Poems With a  Lot of Color <ul><li>The Leopard With Lavender Spots </li></ul><ul><li>The Green Gumdrop Tree </li></ul><ul>...
Websites <ul><li>Giggle Poetry </li></ul><ul><li>Limmericks </li></ul><ul><li>Find rhyming words </li></ul><ul><li>Help wr...
Extra  <ul><li>The following slides contain directions for types of poems that may be used for EXTRA CREDIT </li></ul>
<ul><li>The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie. </li></ul><ul><li>He bites it, day by day, </li></ul><ul><li>Until there’s but...
Personification 2 <ul><li>The Sky is Low   </li></ul><ul><li>The sky is low, the clouds are mean, </li></ul><ul><li>A trav...
Personification 3 <ul><li>The Train </li></ul><ul><li>I like to see it lap the miles, </li></ul><ul><li>And lick the valle...
Personification <ul><li>April Rain Song </li></ul><ul><li>Let the rain kiss you </li></ul><ul><li>Let the rain beat upon y...
<ul><li>Notice how metaphors are used in the poems on the following pages.  </li></ul><ul><li>Write a poem using metaphors...
<ul><li>Steam Shovel </li></ul><ul><li>The dinosaurs are not all dead. </li></ul><ul><li>I saw one raise its iron head </l...
<ul><li>Fog </li></ul><ul><li>The fog comes </li></ul><ul><li>on little cat feet. </li></ul><ul><li>It sits looking  </li>...
<ul><li>Mother to Son </li></ul><ul><li>Well, son, I’ll tell you: </li></ul><ul><li>Life for me ain’t been no crystal stai...
Limerick 1 <ul><li>The limerick takes its name from the city of Limerick, Ireland, although no one really knows how or whe...
Limerick 2 <ul><li>There once was a boy with fifty-two socks, </li></ul><ul><li>Whose full name was Abner Wellington Cox <...
Limericks 3 <ul><li>The reverend Henry Ward Beecher </li></ul><ul><li>Called a hen a most elegant creature, </li></ul><ul>...
Limerick 4 <ul><li>There once was a young lady of Niger </li></ul><ul><li>Who smiled as she rode on a tiger; </li></ul><ul...
Limerick 5  Construction <ul><li>Line 1   There was an old man with a cane </li></ul><ul><li>(state the situation) </li></...
Limerick 6 <ul><li>There once was a fish named Fred </li></ul><ul><li>Who never had a bed </li></ul><ul><li>He tried to la...
Limerick 7 Complete these limericks  with words that rhyme. <ul><li>There once was a princess named Meg </li></ul><ul><li>...
Limerick 8 Complete these limericks  with words that rhyme. <ul><li>There once was a horse from ____________________ </li>...
Limerick 9  Your Own  <ul><li>A limerick often begins with “there once was” </li></ul><ul><li>Try writing a limerick follo...
Alliteration 1 <ul><li>The repetition of a sound in two or more neighboring words.  It is the repeated use of an accented ...
Alliteration 2 <ul><li>Six spotted snakes  </li></ul><ul><li>sipped cinnamon cider  </li></ul><ul><li>And stared at Sam, <...
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Poetry Party Directions Jan 11

  1. 1. Poetry Party By Carole Parsons 5/10/2007
  2. 2. SC 5th Grade Standards <ul><ul><ul><li>5-1.7 Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, writing, creative dramatics, and the visual and performing arts). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5-1.9 Understand the characteristics of poetry (including stanza, rhyme scheme, repetition, and refrain). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5-1.10 Predict events in literary texts on the basis of cause-and-effect relationships. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5-5.4 Create written pieces (for example, picture books, comic books, and graphic novels) to entertain a specific udience. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5-6.8 Use appropriate organizational strategies to prepare written works and oral and visual presentations. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5-6.7 Use vocabulary (including Standard American English) that is appropriate for the particular audience of purpose. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Chap Books <ul><li>During the Middle Ages, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, English booksellers would travel the country selling collections of stories, notes and sketches. These writings and sketches were written or drawn by an author, artist or a poet on a single theme, subject, or idea or multiple themes, subjects or ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Use Illuminated Letters to illustrate the cover. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Illuminated Letters <ul><li>Since illuminated letters were popular during the middle ages, use at least one on the cover of your Chap Book to make it more authentic </li></ul><ul><li>Link to more examples… </li></ul>
  5. 5. Poetry Book Table of Contents <ul><li>Haiku (2)……………………………………………………………….. </li></ul><ul><li>Cinquain (2)……………………………………………………………. </li></ul><ul><li>Concrete (2)…………………………………………………………… </li></ul><ul><li>Diamonte' (1)…………………………………………………………. </li></ul><ul><li>Cause Effect Diamonte' (1) ………………………………………… </li></ul><ul><li>Color Poem (2)……………………………………………………….. </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple Voice (1) ……………………………………………………. </li></ul><ul><li>Auto Bio Poem (1) ………………………………………………….. </li></ul><ul><li>Free Verse (2)………………………………………………………… </li></ul><ul><li>Other's Poems (3)………………………………………………..…… </li></ul><ul><li>Appendix: stanzas, rhyme schemes, and the use of repetition and refrains </li></ul>
  6. 6. Appendix <ul><li>Refrain : a passage repeated at regular intervals, usually in a poem or song. </li></ul><ul><li>Repetition : the recurrence of sounds, words, phrases, lines, or stanzas used for emphasis. </li></ul><ul><li>Rhyme Scheme: the pattern in rhyme or verse which represents identical or highly familiar final sounds in lines of verse (for example, aabba in a limerick). </li></ul><ul><li>Stanza: a group of lines forming a unit in a poem or song, similar to a paragraph in prose. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Auto Bio Poem <ul><li>Line 1: Your first name Nancy </li></ul><ul><li>Line 2: Four descriptive traits Honest, caring, curious, energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Line 3: Sibling of... Sister of Kenneth </li></ul><ul><li>Line 4: Lover of (people, ideas) Laughter, learning, challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Line 5: Who feels... Joy when traveling </li></ul><ul><li>Line 6: Who needs... Sunshine every day </li></ul><ul><li>Line 7: Who gives... Friendship, encouragement, and smiles </li></ul><ul><li>Line 8: Who fears... Pain, hunger, and the end of summer </li></ul><ul><li>Line 9: Who would like to see... Contentment for all living things </li></ul><ul><li>Line 10: Resident of (your city) Phoenix </li></ul><ul><li>Line 11: Your last name Haugen </li></ul>A completed example
  8. 8. Haiku <ul><li>Formal Japanese Haiku is usually light and delicate in feeling and is concerned with something lovely in nature, especially the season of the year. </li></ul><ul><li>Haiku packs a lot of meaning into 17 unrhymed syllables in three lines of poetry - </li></ul><ul><li>5 syllables in the first line </li></ul><ul><li>7 syllables in the second line </li></ul><ul><li>5 syllables in the last line </li></ul><ul><li>Nature’s wonder is haiku’s theme. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Haiku <ul><li>Loud, crashing thunder </li></ul><ul><li>And then the rain pouring down </li></ul><ul><li>The rainbow appears </li></ul><ul><li>Gentle waterfall, </li></ul><ul><li>Tripping over rocks and stones </li></ul><ul><li>Creating beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Dew forms in gardens! </li></ul><ul><li>Emerald plants burst gaily, </li></ul><ul><li>As sunlight breaks through. </li></ul><ul><li>Rain clouds hang heavy! </li></ul><ul><li>Lightning strikes while thunder roars! </li></ul><ul><li>Rain patters softly… </li></ul><ul><li>Scarlet cardinal </li></ul><ul><li>Standing in the soft white snow; </li></ul><ul><li>Flies away swiftly. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Rosebud” </li></ul><ul><li>Such precious beauty </li></ul><ul><li>Upon a stalk so fearsome </li></ul><ul><li>How wise is nature! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Your Own Haiku <ul><li>1 2 3 4 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Hanging from a branch </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 5 6 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Ripe, bright red, and succulent </li></ul><ul><li>1 2 3 4 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Waiting to be picked </li></ul><ul><li>Fill in a 7 syllable line </li></ul><ul><li>Green pines in the woods </li></ul><ul><li>_____________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Standing tall and proud. </li></ul><ul><li>Fill in lines 1 and 3 </li></ul><ul><li>_____________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Crystals shining in the sun </li></ul><ul><li>_____________________ </li></ul>
  11. 11. Multiple Voice <ul><li>Two-voice poetry is written for two people to perform. The poetry has two columns – one for each person who is reading the poem. </li></ul><ul><li>Each person reading the poem reads the text in one of the columns. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes the poet wants the two readers to say something at the same time: so the poet writes the words on the same line in each column. </li></ul><ul><li>These poems often sound like a dialogue for two people. </li></ul>examples
  12. 12. Multiple Voice 2 <ul><li>Just like all poetry, poems for two voices need an idea. </li></ul><ul><li>Nature makes great subject matter for two-voice poetry. Two-voice poems can also be written about school, current events, or events in books/movies. </li></ul><ul><li>In writing your own poem for two voices, think about ideas that need discussion or make for great dialogue. </li></ul><ul><li>List 3 ideas from your own life that might make for good poetry with more than one voice. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1.__________________________________________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. __________________________________________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. __________________________________________ </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Multiple Voice 3 <ul><li>Need More Structure? Try this… </li></ul><ul><li>Divide a paper by drawing a line in the middle of the page or making a crease. </li></ul><ul><li>The left side of the poem will be your voice. The right side of the poem will be a person, animal, or object with whom you would like to have a conversation. </li></ul><ul><li>You will make the first response, and the person, animal or object will respond to your statement or question. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue this back and forth conversation until you feel it has been completed. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Cinquain 1 <ul><li>The modern cinquain is based on a word count of words of a certain type. </li></ul><ul><li>line 1 - one word (noun) a title or name of the subject </li></ul><ul><li>line 2 - two words (adjectives) describing the title </li></ul><ul><li>line 3 - three words (verbs) describing an action related to the title </li></ul><ul><li>line 4 - four words describing a feeling about the title, a complete sentence </li></ul><ul><li>line 5 - one word referring back to the title of the poem </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Triangles </li></ul><ul><li>pointy edges </li></ul><ul><li>revolving, rotating, angling </li></ul><ul><li>Triangles are all different. </li></ul><ul><li>180º </li></ul>Cinquain 2
  16. 16. Diamante` 1 <ul><li>Diamond-shaped poems that use nouns and adjectives to describe either one central topic or two opposing topics (for example, night/day or winter/spring). </li></ul><ul><li>Vist this website which has an interactive tool that you can use to write diamante poetry. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/diamante/ </li></ul>
  17. 17. Diamante` 2 <ul><li>Caterpillar, </li></ul><ul><li>Fuzzy, tickly, </li></ul><ul><li>Eating, crawling, metamorphosing, </li></ul><ul><li>Inching along then soaring off - </li></ul><ul><li>Flitting, sipping, dancing, </li></ul><ul><li>Delicate, lacy, </li></ul><ul><li>Butterfly </li></ul><ul><li>-Carole Beattie Parsons </li></ul>
  18. 18. Diamante` 3 <ul><li>Line 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Line 7 </li></ul>Jungle Abundant, soggy Growing, stretching, living Vegetation, overgrowth, void, wasteland Decaying, drying, dying Sandy, hot Desert Topic 2 adj. 3 “ing” verb 2nouns/2nouns 3 “ing verbs 2 adj. opposite
  19. 19. Cause and Effect <ul><li>The Spelling Test </li></ul><ul><li>Study </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge, Dedication </li></ul><ul><li>Repeating, Memorizing, Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Practice, Analysis, Success, Victory </li></ul><ul><li>Cheering, Smiling, Celebrating </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent, Masterful </li></ul><ul><li>100% </li></ul><ul><li>Cause and Effect Statement: </li></ul><ul><li>I studied hard for my spelling test </li></ul><ul><li>and got 100%! </li></ul>Line 1: Poem Topic (the cause) Line 2: Two adjectives about the cause/topic Line 3: Three –ing words about the cause/topic Line 4: Four nouns or a short phrase linking the cause/topic with its effect Line 5: Three –ing words about the effect Line 6: Two adjectives about the effect Line 7: The effect
  20. 20. Cause and Effect <ul><li>Spring Showers </li></ul><ul><li>Sprinkling </li></ul><ul><li>Cool, Clean </li></ul><ul><li>Renewing, Reviving, Cleansing, Refreshing </li></ul><ul><li>Water, Rain, Mud, Puddles </li></ul><ul><li>Flooding, Washing, Flowing </li></ul><ul><li>Muddy, Wet </li></ul><ul><li>Cause and Effect Statement: Cause and Effect Statement: Springtime rain showers create mud puddles to splash in. </li></ul>Line 1: Poem Topic (the cause) Line 2: Two adjectives about the cause/topic Line 3: Three –ing words about the cause/topic Line 4: Four nouns or a short phrase linking the cause/topic with its effect Line 5: Three –ing words about the effect Line 6: Two adjectives about the effect Line 7: The effect
  21. 21. Concrete Poetry 1 <ul><li>Concrete poetry involves arranging the letters or words that describe an object into a visual image that also describes the object. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a kind of painting with letters or words as the medium. Look around for objects that have interesting forms or the patterns they create. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what you want to say or convey about your subject. What is interesting about your subject, is it the shape, smell, or taste? </li></ul><ul><li>Make lists of words you might use to describe these different characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>Now play with the words to form a picture. Think about varying the words you use, the shape and sizes of letter forms and how to position them on the page. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Concrete Poetry 2 <ul><li>Is written in the shape of the topic of the poem. Rhyme is not important in concrete poetry. </li></ul><ul><li>Visit this website which has an interactive tool that you can use to write concrete poetry. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/shape/ </li></ul>
  23. 23. Concrete 3
  24. 24. <ul><li>One way to get started: </li></ul><ul><li>Think of a food you like to eat. </li></ul><ul><li>List many different words that describe your food or that tell how you feel about it. </li></ul>Concrete 4
  25. 25. Concrete 5
  26. 26. Concrete 11
  27. 27. Concrete 7
  28. 28. Concrete 8
  29. 29. Concrete 9
  30. 30. Concrete 10
  31. 31. Color Poetry <ul><li>How do you know color? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you know it best because you have seen it? </li></ul><ul><li>For most people, color is what they see with their eyes. But for others, color is an experience-something to be known through all the senses and welcomed as a friend. We can do more than only see a color, we can hear it, smell it, taste it, and touch it. Color can reach deep inside us and be what we feel. </li></ul><ul><li>Mary O’Neill captures the experience of color in the poetry of Hailstones and Halibut Bones . She takes us beyond sight to feel the colorfulness of color. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Hailstones and Halibut Bones <ul><li>The colors live </li></ul><ul><li>Between black and white </li></ul><ul><li>In a land that we </li></ul><ul><li>Know best by sight. </li></ul><ul><li>But knowing best </li></ul><ul><li>Isn’t everything, </li></ul><ul><li>For colors dance </li></ul><ul><li>And colors sing, </li></ul><ul><li>And colors laugh </li></ul><ul><li>And colors cry— </li></ul><ul><li>Turn off the light </li></ul><ul><li>And colors die, </li></ul><ul><li>And they make you feel </li></ul><ul><li>Every feeling there is </li></ul><ul><li>From the grumpiest grump </li></ul><ul><li>To the fizziest fizz. </li></ul><ul><li>And you and you and I </li></ul><ul><li>Know well </li></ul><ul><li>Each has a taste </li></ul><ul><li>And each has a smell </li></ul><ul><li>And each has wonderful </li></ul><ul><li>Story to tell… </li></ul>
  33. 33. <ul><li>Chartreuse is... the color of spring. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is... renewal. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is... the color of envy. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is... a new crayon. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse tastes like... a crisp apple. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse smells like... fresh cut grass. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse sounds like... a croaking frog. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse feels like soft, velvety moss. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse looks like... shiny emeralds. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse makes me... go. </li></ul><ul><li>Chartreuse is... my favorite color. </li></ul>
  34. 34. <ul><li>Green is go, </li></ul><ul><li>And red is stop, </li></ul><ul><li>And yellow is peaches </li></ul><ul><li>With cream on top. </li></ul><ul><li>Earth is brown, </li></ul><ul><li>And blue is sky; </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow looks well </li></ul><ul><li>On a butterfly. </li></ul><ul><li>Clouds are white, </li></ul><ul><li>black, pink, or mocha; </li></ul><ul><li>yellow’s a dish of </li></ul><ul><li>Tapioca. </li></ul><ul><li>-David McCord </li></ul><ul><li>Colors </li></ul><ul><li>My skin is kind of sort of brownish </li></ul><ul><li>Pinkish yellowish white. </li></ul><ul><li>My eyes are greyish blueish green, </li></ul><ul><li>But I’m told they look orange in the night. </li></ul><ul><li>My hair is reddish blondish brown, </li></ul><ul><li>But its silver when its wet. </li></ul><ul><li>And all the colors I am inside </li></ul><ul><li>Have not been invented yet. </li></ul><ul><li>-Shel Silverstein </li></ul>
  35. 35. <ul><li>We could learn a lot </li></ul><ul><li>from crayons: </li></ul><ul><li>Some are sharp, some are dull, </li></ul><ul><li>Some have weird names, </li></ul><ul><li>They come in many different colors. </li></ul><ul><li>But they all have to learn </li></ul><ul><li>to live in the same box. </li></ul><ul><li>- </li></ul><ul><li>When the light is green you go. </li></ul><ul><li>When the light is red you stop. </li></ul><ul><li>But what do you do </li></ul><ul><li>When the light turns blue </li></ul><ul><li>With orange and lavender spots? </li></ul>
  36. 36. <ul><li>What is pink? A rose is pink </li></ul><ul><li>By the fountain’s brink. </li></ul><ul><li>What is red? A poppy’s red </li></ul><ul><li>In its barley bed. </li></ul><ul><li>What is blue? The sky is blue </li></ul><ul><li>Where the clouds float through </li></ul><ul><li>What is white? A swan is white </li></ul><ul><li>Sailing in the light. </li></ul><ul><li>What is yellow? Pears are yellow, </li></ul><ul><li>Rich and ripe and mellow. </li></ul><ul><li>What is green? The grass is green, </li></ul><ul><li>With small flowers between. </li></ul><ul><li>What is violet? Clouds are violet </li></ul><ul><li>In the summer twilight. </li></ul><ul><li>What is orange? Why, an orange, </li></ul><ul><li>Just an orange! </li></ul><ul><li>-Christina Rossetti </li></ul>
  37. 37. What Your Favorite Color Tells About You <ul><li>Marketing experts use color psychology to help sell products- ever notice that popular fast-food chains use high-energy colors like orange in their décor? </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself, “If I were a color, what color would I be?” the answer will tell you how you see yourself. From The Language of Color by Dorothee Mella </li></ul>
  38. 38. Color Test <ul><li>Light blue: creative, perceptive, imaginative </li></ul><ul><li>Dark blue: intelligent, responsible </li></ul><ul><li>Mauve: delicate, reserved, sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Purple: intuitive, regal, spiritual </li></ul><ul><li>Brown: honest, down-to-earth, supportive </li></ul><ul><li>Black: disciplined, strong-wiled, independent </li></ul><ul><li>White: individualistic, egocentric, lonely </li></ul><ul><li>Gray: passive, noncommital, stressed </li></ul><ul><li>Silver: honorable, chivalrous, romantic </li></ul><ul><li>Gold: idealistic, noble, successful </li></ul><ul><li>Red: ambitious, energetic, courageous </li></ul><ul><li>Pink: affectionate, loving, compassionate </li></ul><ul><li>Maroon: sensuous, emotional, gregarious </li></ul><ul><li>Orange: competent, organized, impatient </li></ul><ul><li>Peach: gentle, charitable, enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow: communicative, expressive, social </li></ul><ul><li>Mint green: modest, insightful, composed </li></ul><ul><li>Apple green: innovative, adventurous </li></ul><ul><li>Green: benevolent, humanistic, scientific </li></ul><ul><li>Blue green: idealistic, faithful </li></ul>
  39. 39. The colors you wear can have a psychological impact. This is important if you are trying to “dress for success.” Here are some common psychological associations of colors: <ul><li>Red: hot, dangerous, angry passionate, sentimental, exciting vibrant and aggressive. </li></ul><ul><li>Orange : lively, cheerful, joyous warm, energetic, hopeful, and hospitable. </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow : bright, sunny, cheerful, warm, prosperous, cowardly and deceitful. </li></ul><ul><li>Green: calm, cool, fresh, friendly, pleasant, balanced, restful, lucky, envious and immature. </li></ul><ul><li>Blue: peaceful, calm, restful, highly esteemed, serene, tranquil, truthful, cool, formal, spacious, sad and depressed. </li></ul><ul><li>Purple: royal, dignified, powerful, rich, dominating, mysterious, wise and passionate. </li></ul><ul><li>White: Innocent, youthful, faithful, pure and peaceful. </li></ul><ul><li>Black: mysterious, tragic, serious, sad, dignified, silent, old, sophisticated, strong, wise, evil and gloomy </li></ul><ul><li>Gray: modest, sad, and old. </li></ul>Color 12
  40. 40. <ul><li>Indigo </li></ul><ul><li>Cerise </li></ul><ul><li>Puce </li></ul><ul><li>Slate </li></ul><ul><li>Crimson </li></ul><ul><li>Emerald </li></ul><ul><li>Amber </li></ul><ul><li>Scarlet </li></ul><ul><li>Aqua </li></ul><ul><li>Ebony </li></ul><ul><li>Salmon </li></ul><ul><li>Magenta </li></ul>Amethyst Copper Chartreuse Jade Sapphire
  41. 41. Color Poetry <ul><li> (selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) is .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) tastes like .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) smells like .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) sounds like .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) feels like .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) looks like .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) makes me .... </li></ul><ul><li>(selected color) is .... </li></ul>
  42. 42. Poems With a Lot of Color <ul><li>The Leopard With Lavender Spots </li></ul><ul><li>The Green Gumdrop Tree </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. Willy, the Color Wizard </li></ul><ul><li>My Ride on a Rainbow </li></ul><ul><li>The Pink Porcupine’s Problem </li></ul><ul><li>When the Ocean Turned Gold </li></ul><ul><li>The Violet That Played the Violin </li></ul><ul><li>The Brown Bear Who Made the Baseball Team </li></ul><ul><li>Lost in the Black Cave </li></ul><ul><li>The Blue Balloon Escape </li></ul><ul><li>The day Green Disappeared </li></ul><ul><li>The boy With the Blue Face </li></ul><ul><li>The Purple House on Murple Street </li></ul><ul><li>The Pink Bubblegum Machine </li></ul><ul><li>The Apple That Grew on the Orange Tree </li></ul>
  43. 43. Websites <ul><li>Giggle Poetry </li></ul><ul><li>Limmericks </li></ul><ul><li>Find rhyming words </li></ul><ul><li>Help writing poems </li></ul><ul><li>Shel Silverstein </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Grins & Giggles </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry Stuff </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry Zone </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry Stuff </li></ul>
  44. 44. Extra <ul><li>The following slides contain directions for types of poems that may be used for EXTRA CREDIT </li></ul>
  45. 45. <ul><li>The Moon’s the North Wind’s Cookie. </li></ul><ul><li>He bites it, day by day, </li></ul><ul><li>Until there’s but a rim of scraps </li></ul><ul><li>That crumble all away </li></ul><ul><li>The South Wind is a baker. </li></ul><ul><li>He kneads clouds in his den, </li></ul><ul><li>And bakes a crisp new moon that…greedy </li></ul><ul><li>North…Wind…eats…again! </li></ul><ul><li>-Vachel Lindsay </li></ul>Personification 1
  46. 46. Personification 2 <ul><li>The Sky is Low </li></ul><ul><li>The sky is low, the clouds are mean, </li></ul><ul><li>A traveling flake of snow </li></ul><ul><li>Across a barn or through a rut </li></ul><ul><li>Debates if it will go. </li></ul><ul><li>A narrow wind complains all day </li></ul><ul><li>How some one treated him; </li></ul><ul><li>Nature, like us, is sometimes caught </li></ul><ul><li>Without her diadem. </li></ul><ul><li>Emily Dickinson </li></ul>
  47. 47. Personification 3 <ul><li>The Train </li></ul><ul><li>I like to see it lap the miles, </li></ul><ul><li>And lick the valleys up, </li></ul><ul><li>And stop to feed itself at tanks; </li></ul><ul><li>And then, prodigious, step </li></ul><ul><li>Around a pile of mountains, </li></ul><ul><li>And, supercilious, peer </li></ul><ul><li>In shanties by the sides of roads; </li></ul><ul><li>And then a quarry pare </li></ul><ul><li>To fit its sides, and crawl between, </li></ul><ul><li>Complaining all the while </li></ul><ul><li>In horrid, hooting stanza; </li></ul><ul><li>Then chase itself down hill </li></ul><ul><li>And neigh like Boanerges; </li></ul><ul><li>Then, punctual as a start its own, </li></ul><ul><li>Stop-docile and omnipotent- </li></ul><ul><li>A stable door. </li></ul><ul><li>By Emily Dickinson </li></ul>
  48. 48. Personification <ul><li>April Rain Song </li></ul><ul><li>Let the rain kiss you </li></ul><ul><li>Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops </li></ul><ul><li>Let the rain sing you a lullaby </li></ul><ul><li>The rain makes still pools on the sidewalk </li></ul><ul><li>The rain makes running pools in the gutter </li></ul><ul><li>The rain plays a little sleep song on our roof at night </li></ul><ul><li>And I love the rain. </li></ul><ul><li>by Langston Hughes </li></ul>
  49. 49. <ul><li>Notice how metaphors are used in the poems on the following pages. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a poem using metaphors to make it more than just sparkly, make it scintillate! </li></ul>It's Scintillating! Metaphors 1
  50. 50. <ul><li>Steam Shovel </li></ul><ul><li>The dinosaurs are not all dead. </li></ul><ul><li>I saw one raise its iron head </li></ul><ul><li>To watch me walking down the road </li></ul><ul><li>Beyond our house today. </li></ul><ul><li>Its jaws were dripping with a load </li></ul><ul><li>Of earth and grass that it had cropped. </li></ul><ul><li>It must have heard me where I stopped, </li></ul><ul><li>Snorted white steam my way </li></ul><ul><li>And stretched its long neck out to see, </li></ul><ul><li>And chewed, and grinned quite amiably. </li></ul><ul><li>-Charles Malam </li></ul>Metaphors 2
  51. 51. <ul><li>Fog </li></ul><ul><li>The fog comes </li></ul><ul><li>on little cat feet. </li></ul><ul><li>It sits looking </li></ul><ul><li>over harbor and city </li></ul><ul><li>on silent haunches </li></ul><ul><li>and, moves on. - Carl Sandburg </li></ul>Metaphors 3
  52. 52. <ul><li>Mother to Son </li></ul><ul><li>Well, son, I’ll tell you: </li></ul><ul><li>Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s had tacks in it, </li></ul><ul><li>And splinters, </li></ul><ul><li>And boards torn up, </li></ul><ul><li>And places with no carpet on the floor— </li></ul><ul><li>Bare. </li></ul><ul><li>But all the time </li></ul><ul><li>I’se been a-climbin’ on, </li></ul><ul><li>And reachin’ landin’s and turnin’ corners, </li></ul><ul><li>And sometimes goin in the dark </li></ul><ul><li>Where there ain’t been no light. </li></ul><ul><li>So boy, don’t you turn back. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t you set down on the steps </li></ul><ul><li>‘ cause you finds it’s kinder hard. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t you fall now- </li></ul><ul><li>For I’se still goin’, honey, </li></ul><ul><li>I’se still climbin’, </li></ul><ul><li>And life for me aint’ been no crystal stair. </li></ul><ul><li>- Langston Hughes </li></ul>Metaphors 4
  53. 53. Limerick 1 <ul><li>The limerick takes its name from the city of Limerick, Ireland, although no one really knows how or where the form originated, although a man named Edward Lear made them popular many years ago. The limerick is a humorous, nonsense verse consisting of a triplet and a couplet, a five line poem. </li></ul><ul><li>Covering a wide range of subjects, the first line of a limerick often begins with “there once was” or “There was” and ends with the name of a person. </li></ul><ul><li>Lines 1, 2, and 5 rhyme and form the triplet. </li></ul><ul><li>Lines 3 and 4 rhyme and form the couplet. </li></ul><ul><li>The rhyming pattern is AABBA </li></ul>
  54. 54. Limerick 2 <ul><li>There once was a boy with fifty-two socks, </li></ul><ul><li>Whose full name was Abner Wellington Cox </li></ul><ul><li>Wearing one pair a week </li></ul><ul><li>Made his mother quite weak </li></ul><ul><li>As he washed feet and socks in her pots. </li></ul><ul><li>There was an old man of Nantucket, </li></ul><ul><li>Who kept all his cash in a bucket; </li></ul><ul><li>But his daughter, named Nan, </li></ul><ul><li>Ran away with a man, </li></ul><ul><li>And as for the bucket- Nantucket. </li></ul>
  55. 55. Limericks 3 <ul><li>The reverend Henry Ward Beecher </li></ul><ul><li>Called a hen a most elegant creature, </li></ul><ul><li>The hen, pleased with that, </li></ul><ul><li>Laid an egg in his hat - </li></ul><ul><li>And thus did the hen reward Beecher! </li></ul><ul><li>There once was an old man of Esser, </li></ul><ul><li>Whose knowledge grew lesser and lesser, </li></ul><ul><li>It at last grew so small </li></ul><ul><li>He knew nothing at all, </li></ul><ul><li>And now he's a college professor. </li></ul>
  56. 56. Limerick 4 <ul><li>There once was a young lady of Niger </li></ul><ul><li>Who smiled as she rode on a tiger; </li></ul><ul><li>They returned from the ride </li></ul><ul><li>With the lady inside </li></ul><ul><li>And the smile on the face of the tiger. </li></ul>The last line of a limerick is often written with a humorous twist. Lines 1, 2, 5 rhyme Lines 3 & 4 rhyme
  57. 57. Limerick 5 Construction <ul><li>Line 1 There was an old man with a cane </li></ul><ul><li>(state the situation) </li></ul><ul><li>Line 2 Who tried to do flips down the lane </li></ul><ul><li>(what happened) </li></ul><ul><li>Line 3 But his cane somehow broke </li></ul><ul><li>(what went wrong) </li></ul><ul><li>Line 4 And this sorry old bloke </li></ul><ul><li>(what went wrong) </li></ul><ul><li>Line 5 Ended up with a terrible pain. </li></ul><ul><li>(result) </li></ul>
  58. 58. Limerick 6 <ul><li>There once was a fish named Fred </li></ul><ul><li>Who never had a bed </li></ul><ul><li>He tried to lay down </li></ul><ul><li>But he almost drowned </li></ul><ul><li>And the hard pebbles hurt his head </li></ul><ul><li>By the class of 2008 </li></ul>
  59. 59. Limerick 7 Complete these limericks with words that rhyme. <ul><li>There once was a princess named Meg </li></ul><ul><li>Who accidentally broke her _________ </li></ul><ul><li>She slipped on the ______________ </li></ul><ul><li>Not once, but twice </li></ul><ul><li>Take no pity on her, I ________________ </li></ul>
  60. 60. Limerick 8 Complete these limericks with words that rhyme. <ul><li>There once was a horse from ____________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Who spoke to his master ________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>The master was _______________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>And fell to his _________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>And the horse galloped off to _____________________ </li></ul>
  61. 61. Limerick 9 Your Own <ul><li>A limerick often begins with “there once was” </li></ul><ul><li>Try writing a limerick following this pattern. </li></ul><ul><li>There once was__________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>Who___________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>_______________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>_______________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>_______________________________________ </li></ul>
  62. 62. Alliteration 1 <ul><li>The repetition of a sound in two or more neighboring words. It is the repeated use of an accented syllable that has the same beginning sound, as in “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers….” </li></ul><ul><li>For great inspiration, read the book “Animalia” by Grahme Base. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Alice ate an alligator </li></ul><ul><li>Henry had a hank of hair </li></ul>
  63. 63. Alliteration 2 <ul><li>Six spotted snakes </li></ul><ul><li>sipped cinnamon cider </li></ul><ul><li>And stared at Sam, </li></ul><ul><li>a passing spider. </li></ul><ul><li>Write a 4 to 6 line poem using the same sound to start as many words as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to rhyme every other line. </li></ul>

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