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Western European Study Group IU Bloomington

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Talk for public school educators about using "folk" musics in the foreign-language classroom

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Western European Study Group IU Bloomington

  1. 1. Vernacular literatures in the (post-)/(multi-)literate classroom “ A Homeland of the Mind” Incorporating Culture in the Language Classroom: Exploring Cultural Identity through Music Indiana University Bloomington, June 2009 Dr Christopher Smith, Associate Professor & Chair of Musicology; Director: Vernacular Music Center & TTU Celtic Ensemble Texas Tech School of Music - christopher.smith@ttu.edu http://ttuvmc.org
  2. 2. Seamus Ennis: “The Grip”
  3. 3. Disclaimer!
  4. 4. VMC
  5. 5. “ Vernacular”?
  6. 6. Example: Message: Trust your own performance skills
  7. 7. Belle je me’en vais en Allemagne
  8. 8. What, where, and who?
  9. 9. Pre- versus post-literacy One key insight
  10. 10. John Barleycorn
  11. 11. The world, the classroom, & the body that links them One key insight
  12. 12. An dro: Garcon a marier
  13. 13. Intuition 1 Vernacular literatures
  14. 14. Seamus Ennis: Don Niperi Septo
  15. 15. Intuition 2 Those literatures’ precision
  16. 16. The Constitution and the Guerriere The Constitution and the Guerriere
  17. 17. Intuition 3 Paying attention to these literatures
  18. 18. The Shan Van Vocht
  19. 19. Intuition 4 Relevance beyond the ancient
  20. 20. Gerrard Winstanley (1609-76): You Noble Diggers All
  21. 21. Premise Topics versus mindsets
  22. 22. The Threes… and Sevens…
  23. 23. Premise Learning modes, ancient & post-modern
  24. 24. Patterns & their power “ Read one, see one, do one.”
  25. 25. Example: the power of the drone: Óró Sé Do Bheatha Abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Now the summer is coming Grannie mhoal (Grace O'Malley) will cross the ocean With armed warriors as her guard. Gaels are they, not French nor Spaniards. They will overwhelm to the foreigners. Oro... Thank Heaven's King that we shall see Even though we die soon after (the next week). Grannie Mhoal and a thousand warriors Herald the stranger's retreat Oro…
  26. 26. Premise Students: strengths Example: Iconography
  27. 27. “ Farmer Giles & his wife shewing off their daughter Betty to their neighbours, on her return from school” --James Gilray, 1809
  28. 28. Premise Students: handicaps
  29. 29. You scholars of English one question I'll ask To answer you won't find a difficult task Of Shakespeare's great heroes,/ which one would you pick To award him first prize for being totally thick Othello you know was a gullible dupe And Hamlet's delaying landed him in the soup But the stupidest moron in all of Shakespeare Was that old King of England, the man they call Lear   Three daughters he had in the course of his life Although we're not told what befell his poor wife I'll bet she ran off to avoid going insane After years of enduring that pompous oul pain At the Donkey and Crown where he drank every night The locals all knew poor old Lear wasn't bright When they said your "Royal Highness we love and revere" The oul fool lapped it up and bought everyone beer   a ACT I. Scene I.   Enter Kent, Gloucester, and Edmund   … Glou. Sir, this young fellow's mother could; whereupon she grew round-womb'd, and had indeed, sir, a son for her cradle ere she had a husband for her bed. Do you smell a fault? Kent. I cannot wish the fault undone, the issue of it being so proper.   Glou. But I have, sir, a son by order of law, some year elder than this, who yet is no dearer in my account. Though this knave came something saucily into the world before he was sent for, yet was his mother fair, there was good sport at his making, and the whoreson must be acknowledged.
  30. 30. OOR HAMLET (Adam McNaughtan) There was this king nodding In his garden all alane When his brither in his ear dropped A wee tait of henbane Then he stole his brother's crown And his money and his widow But the dead king walked and got his son And said,"Now listen, kiddo I've been killed and it's your duty To take revenge on Claudius Kill him quick and clean and show The nation what a fraud he is The boy says, "Right, I'll do it But I'll have to play it crafty So that nobody will suspect me I'll kid on that I'm a dafty
  31. 31. Premise “ New” literacies
  32. 32. Premise Visceral/intuitive
  33. 33. Breton bourees
  34. 34. “ Once upon a time…” Premise
  35. 35. Patterns & their power
  36. 36. Na Ceannabhain Bhana Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans
  37. 37. Patterns & their power Memory, orality, recall
  38. 38. Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
  39. 39. Patterns & their power Extending this use
  40. 40. Patterns & their power “ Let me tell you a story…”
  41. 41. Patterns & their power Context & content & their interplay
  42. 42. Thank you!
  43. 43. Participation
  44. 44. “ party pieces”
  45. 45. Making rather than buying
  46. 46. Finding your own repertoires to teach the concepts you want to teach
  47. 47. Music as a medium, language as another
  48. 48. Ethics, values, history, critical reading/listening/speaking/thinking
  49. 49. Multi-generational communication
  50. 50. Skills versus data
  51. 51. Modeling desired modes
  52. 52. Expert musicianship is not the issue; most of these musics were originally intended for participation

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