Chasing Print<br />Generating topics<br />Headline: begin by considering the type of work you want/like to do; allow topic...
Chasing Print<br />Identifying targets<br />Headline: identify a target and know its subjects, content, approaches, reques...
Chasing Print<br />Sharpening skills<br />Headline: writing well and appropriately is a skill. Like all skills, it improve...
Chasing Print<br />Serendipity and visibility<br />Headline: no piece of writing ever suffers from additional rewritings f...
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Slideshow from TTU Musicology Colloquium on Publishing

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Slideshow from TTU Musicology Colloquium on Publishing. Thoughts on generating topics, identifying targets, promulgating contacts.

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  • http://ttumusicology.wikispaces.com/Developing+grant+proposals
  • http://ttumusicology.wikispaces.com/Developing+grant+proposals
  • Slideshow from TTU Musicology Colloquium on Publishing

    1. 1. Chasing Print<br />Generating topics<br />Headline: begin by considering the type of work you want/like to do; allow topics to proceed from that (rather than the reverse)<br />Rather than thinking exclusively about time-periods, composers, or specific works that interest you, think about approaches you find congenial. <br />What kinds of research-work appeal to you: Score-study? Primary sources? Biographical links to compositions? Culture/context/reception of works? Interaction b/w music and other cultural/historical phenomena? Oral history? Etc…<br />What repertoires appeal? Orchestral? Chamber? Solo? Song? Non-traditionla/vernacular? New music?<br />What time periods or geographical regions appeal? It is no longer the case that musicologists &quot;only deal with classical music&quot;; musicology is now very widely-understood to encompass the whole world of music and the whole gamut of analytical approaches.<br />Different topics will tend to demand different types of research approaches. If you have a sense of the research approaches you might find congenial, you can reverse-engineer to find topics that respond well to those certain approaches.<br />
    2. 2. Chasing Print<br />Identifying targets<br />Headline: identify a target and know its subjects, content, approaches, requested formats, roster of authors, etc<br />Identify publishers, publishers’ series, and journals which address topics/approaches you intend to engage.<br />Read sample Tables of Contents, Indices, Bibliographies, and “Guidelines for Authors”<br />If a publisher: identify the editor most directly engaged with the subjects under which your topic falls.<br />If a journal, read sample articles, paying attention to both topics, writing style, and also technical specifics.<br />Different topics will tend to demand different types of research approaches. If you have a sense of the research approaches you might find congenial, you can reverse-engineer to find topics that respond well to those certain approaches.<br />In targeting certain journals or publishers, know and employ their own internal “guidelines” language<br />Link to ttumusicology.wikispaces.com<br />
    3. 3. Chasing Print<br />Sharpening skills<br />Headline: writing well and appropriately is a skill. Like all skills, it improves (only) with extensive practice.<br />Seek opportunities to write on topics relevant to you as widely as possible.<br />Conversely, protect your writing time and energy.<br />Develop venues that permit—and demand—that you write regularly. Elicit editors who can help you make the writing better.<br />As you write, regularly, continually seek to hone your voice, perspectives, tools, and topics; continue to critique your available scholarly tool-set and to fill gaps in it.<br />Likewise, reflect upon your topics of expertise; develop clear language—even a personal “Mission Statement”—which succinctly and effectively articulates the fundamental connections in your own scholarly work which might not be obvious to a casual observer.<br />Use this “Mission Statement” as a means of reflecting upon topics, creating a public scholarly profile, and assessing the relevance of a new piece of writing to your overall scholarly profile as you wish it to be.<br />Lose no opportunity for “audience education” about the content, significance, and relevance to everyday life of your own work.<br />
    4. 4. Chasing Print<br />Serendipity and visibility<br />Headline: no piece of writing ever suffers from additional rewritings for contrasting audiences; hence, seek those audiences.<br />Assume that any full draft will need to go through multiple edits, both self- and other-generated.<br />Assume that any full draft will benefit via presentation to and critique by audiences of diverse makeup.<br />Assume that any full draft, rewritten to most suitably address diverse audiences, has the potential to garner additional hearings.<br />Seek and take advantage of these hearings: colloquia, service presentations, conferences, proceedings. <br />Render and re-render: professional competence, multiple templates, and “The Peter Burkholder Dictum”<br />

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