Muhl5320eir 02a

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  • Audio: Cooley plays; see Carson’s “Last Night’s Fun”
  • Muhl5320eir 02a

    1. 1. IRELAND<br />1<br />
    2. 2. IRELAND<br /><ul><li>Quick review</li></ul>2<br />
    3. 3. IRELAND<br /><ul><li>Introductions</li></ul>3<br />
    4. 4. IRELAND<br />Course procedures (more later)<br /><ul><li>Syllabus
    5. 5. Textbooks
    6. 6. Blackboard content delivery
    7. 7. Assessments (exams)
    8. 8. Projects
    9. 9. Performance projects: “the party piece”</li></ul>Overall course content & intentions: see syllabus<br />The trip:<br /><ul><li>Itinerary
    10. 10. Funding
    11. 11. intent</li></ul>4<br />
    12. 12. IRELAND<br />An island in Europe<br />5<br /><ul><li>Ireland as </li></ul>part of “Atlantic Celtic culture”<br />“edge of the known world”<br />“mythological site”<br />God’s teacup<br />topography, geography, climate, weather patterns, w/ resulting agriculture and rural economy<br />
    13. 13. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>6<br />
    14. 14. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>The theory of history articulated in A Vision centers on a diagram composed of two conic helixes ("gyres"), one situated inside the other, so that the widest part of one cone occupies the same plane as the tip of the other cone, and vice versa. Yeats claimed that this image captured contrary motions inherent within the process of history, and he divided each gyre into different regions that represented particular kinds of historical periods (and could also represent the psychological phases of an individual's development).<br />7<br />More colloquially: the idea that experience, journeys, and/or time move not in a straight line, but in spirals (inward or outward). Both the history of Ireland, and our journey this semester, will follow this kind of spiral pattern.<br />
    15. 15. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>8<br />Opening stanza of Yeats’s poem The Second Coming(1919)<br />written in the wake of the Easter 1916 Rebellion, which he had supported but whose aftermath horrified him.<br />
    16. 16. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>WB Yeats - The Second Coming<br />Turning and turning in the widening gyre<br />The falcon cannot hear the falconer;<br />Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;<br />Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,<br />The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere <br />The ceremony of innocence is drowned; <br />The best lack all conviction, while the worst <br />Are full of passionate intensity.<br />Surely some revelation is at hand...<br />9<br />
    17. 17. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>10<br />
    18. 18. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>11<br />
    19. 19. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”</li></ul>12<br />
    20. 20. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />Newgrange; 360-degree view inside<br />13<br />
    21. 21. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />The Triskelion at Newgrange<br />14<br />
    22. 22. Ireland<br />The Triskelion at Newgrange<br />15<br />The Triskelion at Newgrange<br />
    23. 23. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />What is the Spiral Journey? Key themes:<br />16<br />
    24. 24. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />What is the Spiral Journey? <br />Key themes:<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”
    25. 25. Story, accent and culture
    26. 26. History carried in stories, songs, and tunes—especially in exile
    27. 27. Topography, climate, culture, language, and music
    28. 28. Folklore as intentional, sophisticated, and wise</li></ul>17<br />
    29. 29. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li> Reading from Carson’s Last Night’s Fun, “Last Night’s Fun”</li></ul>Portrush, County Antrim<br />18<br />
    30. 30. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li> Reading from Carson’s Last Night’s Fun, “Last Night’s Fun”</li></ul>“Irish fry” (fried breakfast)<br />19<br />
    31. 31. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li> Reading from Carson’s Last Night’s Fun, “Last Night’s Fun”</li></ul>The Harbour Bar, Portrush<br />20<br />
    32. 32. Listen to these tracks with Carson's chapter "Last Night's Fun" in front of you<br />21<br />
    33. 33. Cooley with Des Mulkere (banjo) and Jack Cooley (bodhran) (1973)<br />The Wise Maid/Last Night's Fun/Daniel O'Connell's/The Boys of the Lough/Miss Monaghan<br />Cooley speaks at:<br />5:50-6:40<br />Notice his vocal quality. Ask yourself why<br />22<br />
    34. 34. Cooley with Joe Leary and Bridie Lafferty (1963)<br />The Humours of Tulla/The Skylark/Roaring Mary<br />23<br />
    35. 35. Cooley with a Chicago ceili band (1962)<br />The Ships are Sailing<br />Girl speaks at:<br />0:09<br />“Who was he? Who was she? And did he ever dance again?”<br />24<br />
    36. 36. Cooley with Des Mulkhere (banjo) (1972)<br />The Sailor on the Rock<br />Tony MacMahon: “Listen between the notes for the great heart that was in this man’s music.”<br />25<br />
    37. 37. Cooley, Des Mulkere, Jack Cooley: Nov 29 1973<br />Cooley died Dec 21 1973<br />26<br />
    38. 38. IRELAND<br />New Material<br />27<br />
    39. 39. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />Readings Discussion for next time:<br /><ul><li> Preface and Chapter 1 “Crossing Drumbargy Brae” in Glassie
    40. 40. “Boil the Breakfast Early” and “Hurry the Jug” in Carson
    41. 41. Introduction and “Music in Early and Medieval Ireland” (to p24) in O hAllmhurain</li></ul>28<br />Open the DQ’s for the above from the “Discussions” tab on Blackboard<br />
    42. 42. Ireland<br />Conversation<br />The 4 Dialects<br /><ul><li>Diadhuit; Dia is muiredhuit</li></ul>29<br />
    43. 43. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br />What is the Spiral Journey? Key themes:<br /><ul><li>Yeats’s “gyres”
    44. 44. Story, accent and culture
    45. 45. History carried in stories, songs, and tunes—especially in exile
    46. 46. Topography, climate, culture, language, and music
    47. 47. Folklore as intentional, sophisticated, and wise
    48. 48. Letting the music and culture teach us the history
    49. 49. Understanding the “what” of the music helps us understand the “why” of the people
    50. 50. Interplay of artistic content  context
    51. 51. Old, new, shifting, and created contexts
    52. 52. Cycles of music and movement (of the body, of objects, of the seasons)
    53. 53. Lore, patterns, memorization, mnemonics, the triads
    54. 54. Inward, outward, and green spirituality
    55. 55. Moving from “outside” closer to “inside”; from observer to participant
    56. 56. Culture’s reciprocity, fragility, and resilience (see Youtube link to TV ad: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMwoexR1evo) </li></ul>30<br />
    57. 57. Ireland<br />In a given cultural context, where does music happen? What (and who) make(s) it happen? What does it DO?<br /><ul><li> Video from Gypsies Sing Long Ballads (Scotland)</li></ul>31<br />
    58. 58. Ireland<br />Óró sé do bheatha 'bhaile (Jacobite 1840s version)<br />link<br />32<br />
    59. 59. Ireland<br />Óró sé do bheatha 'bhaile (Padraig Pearse 1916 version)<br />link<br />33<br />
    60. 60. Ireland<br />In a given cultural context, where does music happen? What (and who) make(s) it happen? What does it DO?<br /><ul><li>Video of Darach O Cahainn singing sean-nos(Ireland)</li></ul>34<br />
    61. 61. Ireland<br />Sean-nos: Darach O Cathain sings <br />Óró sé do bheatha 'bhaile<br />link<br />35<br />
    62. 62. Ireland<br />The Spiral Journey<br /><ul><li> Reading from Carson’s Last Night’s Fun, “Hurry the Jug”</li></ul>36<br />

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