Social Change, New Media and Everyday Makers: A Case Study of Toronto Transit Camp - Proposal

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Proposal presentation for SFU School of Communication honours research, presented Dec. 4th at SFU Burnaby.

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  • I really liked your presentation, especially the term 'Everyday Makers'. I get challenged about this a lot in my writing, and it's hard to find terminology for it. Often I say 'everyday people' and I get challenged about who has access to these tools, and what kinds of priviledge they have. Personally I feel like new media tools like mobile phones and social networks are becoming increasingly accessible and popular. It's going to be interesting to see what effect this has on policy, as citizen voices rise to the forefront.
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Social Change, New Media and Everyday Makers: A Case Study of Toronto Transit Camp - Proposal

  1. 1. Social Change, New Media and Everyday Makers A Case Study of Toronto Transit Camp Karen Fung December 4th, 2007 SFU School of Communication Honours Research Proposal Supervisors: Richard Smith, Martin Laba
  2. 2. The Grid <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Research Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges & Next Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>
  3. 3. Toronto Transit Camp <ul><li>What, when, where? </li></ul><ul><li>For who, by who? </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Why study it? </li></ul><ul><li>Research Goals </li></ul>
  4. 4. Conversation
  5. 5. Literature Review <ul><li>Social Innovation in the Network Society </li></ul><ul><li>E-government and e-democracy </li></ul><ul><li>Technology and Open Source </li></ul><ul><li>Social/Political Capital </li></ul><ul><li>Theoretical tools: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet Connectedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyday Makers </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Research Questions <ul><li>How did expectations and perceptions of the value, of personal and political outcomes of the event differ between Everyday Makers and other participants (such as elected representatives)? </li></ul><ul><li>What functions did the Internet serve in mobilizing Everyday Makers in developing trust in the Toronto Transit Camp event? </li></ul><ul><li>Hypotheses </li></ul>
  7. 7. Methodology <ul><li>Web Survey </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Locating interested interviewees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantitative data for Q1 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Structured Interviews </li></ul>
  8. 8. Challenges & Next Steps <ul><li>Defining Everyday Makers </li></ul><ul><li>Developing research instruments </li></ul><ul><li>Working Connectedness into Method </li></ul><ul><li>Contacting event participants (email only) </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul>
  9. 9. Discussion

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