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The Open Índex

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An argument for the application of open data norms to international indices in development and human rights.

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The Open Índex

  1. 1. Ideology,Technologyand the Open Index:<br />standards for actionable data across borders<br />
  2. 2. Trend 1: The Move to Measure<br />Dramatic proliferation of initiatives to measure human rights and development in recent decades<br />Including:<br />Donor assessments<br />International Initiatives<br />Country and local initiatives<br />
  3. 3. 90<br />88<br />86<br />84<br />96<br />98<br />00<br />02<br />04<br />92<br />94<br />06<br />78<br />76<br />1974<br />08<br />80<br />International data sources on country-level governance<br />(adapted from UNDP Oslo Governance Centre)<br />Global Accountability Report<br />Indicators of Local Democratic Governance<br />Institutional Profiles Database<br />World Governance Assessment<br />Democracy Index <br />Human Rights Indicators<br />World Democracy Audit<br />Gender Empowerment Measure<br />Weberian Comparative State Project<br />Failed States Index<br />State Failure Dataset<br />Civil Society Index<br />Countries at the Crossroads<br />Women in Parliament<br />Press Freedom Index<br />Index of Economic Freedom<br />Index of Human Rights<br />CIRI Human Rights Databse<br />Political Terror Scale<br />Open Budget Index<br />Global Corruption Barometer<br />Commitment to Development<br />Index of Democracy<br />Rule of Law Index<br />Global Competitiveness Index<br />Journalists killed<br />Governance Matters<br />Integrity Index<br />Economic Freedom of the World<br />Bertelsmann Transformation Index<br />Global Peace Index<br />Polity<br />BEEPS<br />International Country Risk Guide<br />CPIA <br />Governance and Democracy Processes<br />World Values Survey<br />Opacity Index<br />Press Freedom Survey<br />Corruption Perceptions Index <br />Freedom in the World<br />Bribe Payers Index<br />GAPS in Workers’ Rights<br />82<br />
  4. 4. Common Measurement Objectives<br />To better understand<br />To impact international policy processes<br />To impact country level practice<br />The great divide:country-led or comparative<br />
  5. 5. Trend 2: The Rise of Technology<br /><ul><li>ICT for development
  6. 6. Social Media for Organisations</li></li></ul><li>Data in the digital age<br />Survey tools<br />Local data online<br />Transnational networks<br />Open gov’t<br />Citizen-generated data<br />Digital dissemination<br />Populist Technologies<br />International Digital Media<br />
  7. 7. Trend 3: Transnational Information Ecologies<br />Especially:<br />Social and political mobilization<br />Knowledge exchange and capacity development<br />
  8. 8. Trend intersection (Measurement - Technology – Globalization)<br />Cross country technologies for data collection<br /><ul><li>Indaba
  9. 9. Swift River
  10. 10. Open Data Kit
  11. 11. TxtEagle</li></ul>Cross country technology for data dissemination<br /><ul><li>The internet</li></li></ul><li>Bridging the Divide? (Measurement - Technology – Globalization)<br />Have the rise of new technologies and transnational communication flows supported increased connectivity and knowledge exchange between national and international actors collecting and mobilizing data on human rights and development?<br />Local actors appear to be reaching out, but very difficult to quantify <br />It is possile to evaluate whether international actors are reaching out.<br />
  12. 12. 90<br />88<br />86<br />84<br />96<br />98<br />00<br />02<br />04<br />92<br />94<br />06<br />78<br />76<br />1974<br />08<br />80<br />Global Accountability Report<br />Indicators of Local Democratic Governance<br />Institutional Profiles Database<br />World Governance Assessment<br />Democracy Index <br />Human Rights Indicators<br />World Democracy Audit<br />Gender Empowerment Measure<br />Weberian Comparative State Project<br />Failed States Index<br />State Failure Dataset<br />Civil Society Index<br />Countries at the Crossroads<br />Women in Parliament<br />Press Freedom Index<br />Index of Economic Freedom<br />Index of Human Rights<br />CIRI Human Rights Databse<br />Political Terror Scale<br />Open Budget Index<br />Global Corruption Barometer<br />Commitment to Development<br />Index of Democracy<br />Rule of Law Index<br />Global Competitiveness Index<br />Journalists killed<br />Governance Matters<br />Integrity Index<br />Economic Freedom of the World<br />Bertelsmann Transformation Index<br />Global Peace Index<br />Polity<br />BEEPS<br />International Country Risk Guide<br />CPIA <br />Governance and Democracy Processes<br />World Values Survey<br />Opacity Index<br />Press Freedom Survey<br />Corruption Perceptions Index <br />Freedom in the World<br />Bribe Payers Index<br />GAPS in Workers’ Rights<br />82<br />
  13. 13. 49 Global Sources for National Data on Development and Human Rights<br />Online presence<br />Measuring the relationship between states and citizens (Social Contract Data)<br />Presenting data on multiple countries<br />Current data (at least from 2008)<br />
  14. 14. Global Sources were coded for:<br />Scopeof data(geographic and thematic), <br />North/South network position <br />Types ofdata(comparative, quantitative, sources)<br />online accessibility<br />degree of digital mediaengagement<br />HYPTOTHESIS: a correlation between country-level engagement and digital engagement<br />
  15. 15. Showed little engagement,<br />1/2 –made data available for download<br />1/3 –online analysis<br />1/4 –used social media<br />1/5 –actual digital engagement<br />
  16. 16. with no obvious correlations.<br />
  17. 17. Why are global data sources not geting wired?<br />Different measurement objectives<br />Path dependency<br />A natural uptake<br />
  18. 18. Costs, opportunities and tradeoffs<br />Costs<br />investment in technical capacities<br />human resources<br />software development <br />institutional costs<br />Opportunities<br />Implementation costs<br />Better data<br /> contextualized<br />real-time<br />validated<br />Engagement <br />Local actionability<br />Perennial Trade-offs<br />Comparative data vs contextualized data<br />International vs national discourse<br />
  19. 19. But…<br />
  20. 20. ..even for comparative ranking advocates who do NOT wish to <br />substantively engage with national actors, <br />adjustmethodologies to reflect lived realities, or <br />expendresources on technology adaption,<br />There is always….<br />
  21. 21. The Open Index: a minimal approach to digital engagement<br />Open Data<br />Complete<br />Non-discriminatory & Machine Readable<br />Licensed open & non-proprietary<br />Open Methods<br />Statistical methods (as suitable for academic pub)<br />Collection methods (including source selection)<br />Primary data documentation & links to original sources<br />Code sheets & background reports<br />Open organisation<br />All organizations involved in collection & analysis<br />Funding sources<br />
  22. 22. Open Data is Used Data<br />
  23. 23. Registers of Actionability<br />Data may be locally actionable for<br />Policy<br />Advocacy<br />Research<br />
  24. 24. The Cost of Closed<br />Political and social capital for local actors<br />Opportunity cost for capacities and knowledge<br />A widening divide<br />
  25. 25. Presentation and international data source spreadsheet<br />avalable at:<br />http://www.engineroom.no/data-sheets/<br />

An argument for the application of open data norms to international indices in development and human rights.

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