Mental Institutions

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  • the 3rd slide I don't honestly think it wasn't good because making a mentally challenged person work on a farm could possible demoralize the person which would make them pretty much brain dead.
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Mental Institutions

  1. 1. Mental Institutions Of The 1930s Iain Maryanow 5/2/09 Period 3
  2. 2. The Good <ul><li>During the 30s, enough asylums were opened to support most “lunatics”. </li></ul><ul><li>In many institutions, patients were able to live freely under supervision. </li></ul><ul><li>Most treatment centers helped and were able to release patients. </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Good (cont.) <ul><li>While living in the institutions, patients helped take care of farms. This made the population of farm land increase. </li></ul><ul><li>Nurses were being trained well from 1928-1934. </li></ul><ul><li>After 1921, asylums switched from shackles and cement walls, to create a comfy feeling. </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Bad <ul><li>With increasing credibility, population of people in the asylums grew. Growing from 200 to nearly 1800 in most institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>It became common for hobos, elderly people without families, and disabled veterans to become “patients”. </li></ul><ul><li>These “patients” would take all the care they needed and when things got better, the left. </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Bad (cont.) <ul><li>From rapid growth in patient population, asylums became understaffed. </li></ul><ul><li>The decline of staff caused more hirings of undertrained nurses. </li></ul><ul><li>Decline in patient care became common and some patients died from having no attention. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Bad (cont.) <ul><li>Medical procedures were done because they were thought to be the cure for “lunatics”. </li></ul><ul><li>Restraints began to be used again. </li></ul><ul><li>In the 1930s, the lobotomy was introduced by Walter J. Freeman. </li></ul><ul><li>Patients began dying when barbaric procedures were done to speed up medical operations. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Medical Procedures <ul><li>Early procedures were submerging patients in ice baths until they lost consciousness. </li></ul><ul><li>Other procedures were inducing a massive shock to the brain. </li></ul><ul><li>Lobotomy: induce sedation, inflict shocks to the brain, insert a device through the patients eyelids to the brain, hammer the device into the frontal lobe, then move the device back and forth in a swiping motion. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Bibliography <ul><li>Leupo, Kimberly. &quot;The History of Mental Illness.&quot; Toddlertime . 1 May 2009 <http://www.toddlertime.com/advocacy/hospitals/Asylum/history-asylum.htm>. </li></ul><ul><li>Storn, Tom. &quot;Opacity Locations.&quot; Opacity . 2007. 1 May 2009 <http://www.opacity.us/locations/>. </li></ul>

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