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Inquiring minds want to know Reading For The Love of It

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Presentation slides from Reading for the Love of it 2015

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Inquiring minds want to know Reading For The Love of It

  1. 1. Inquiring Minds Want To Know Michelle Cordy @cordym Lisa Morris @LisaLMorris
  2. 2. hacktheclassroom.ca
  3. 3. hacktheclassroom.ca
  4. 4. Inquiry Word Count Ontario Curriculum Social Studies 197 Science 54 Language 5 Arts 17 Math 6
  5. 5. Inquiry Word Count Ontario Curriculum Social Studies 197 Science 54 Language 5 Arts 17 Math 6 20132005 20072006 2009
  6. 6. 2001
  7. 7. N = 0 2001
  8. 8. What is Inquiry? • a teaching strategy • a set of student skills • a process for students • a character trait: inquisitiveness • stimulating questions by students • learning to act like professionals in the field Source: Journal of Science Teacher Education by Barrow (2006)
  9. 9. Why inquire? • prepare students academically • help students prepare for work/careers • fulfill a personal need • fulfill societal need • generate greater awareness • experience the discipline like a true professional Source: ZDM Mathematics Education by Artigue and Blomhøj (2013)
  10. 10. Reminds me of…only better. • Research Projects • Centres • KWL Charts • Teachable Moment
  11. 11. Lisa’s Mini Inquiry
  12. 12. Comprehension and Collaboration: Inquiry Circles in Action Harvey and Daniels (2009)
  13. 13. Mini-Inquiries • short term (1 minute/hour/day/week) • small group • research Curricular • Big Ideas (1 unit) • backward design • Resources from teacher for research Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) • More like adult book club • Less focus on roles or worksheets Open Inquires • Student interests • Back mapped to curriculum • Teacher as resource • Highly structured
  14. 14. Mini-Inquiries Curricular Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) Open Inquires
  15. 15. Mini-Inquiries • short term (1 minute/hour/day/week) • small group • research Curricular Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) Open Inquires
  16. 16. Mini-Inquiries • short term (1 minute/hour/day/week) • small group • research Curricular • Big Ideas (1 unit) • backward design • Resources from teacher for research Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) Open Inquires
  17. 17. Mini-Inquiries • short term (1 minute/hour/day/week) • small group • research Curricular • Big Ideas (1 unit) • backward design • Resources from teacher for research Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) • More like adult book club • Less focus on roles or worksheets Open Inquires
  18. 18. Mini-Inquiries • short term (1 minute/hour/day/week) • small group • research Curricular • Big Ideas (1 unit) • backward design • Resources from teacher for research Literature Circle Types of Inquiries Harvey and Daniels (2009) • More like adult book club • Less focus on roles or worksheets Open Inquires • Student interests • Back mapped to curriculum • Teacher as resource • Highly structured
  19. 19. Investigate -ask questions -find answers Immerse -find -topics -wonder Go Public Coalesce -look deeper -focus -synthesize Harvey and Daniels (2009)
  20. 20. Backward Mapping Harvey and Daniels (2009) p.261 • making connections • inferring • supporting answers using textual information and previous experience • critical thinking and evaluating • determining purpose, exploring bias
  21. 21. -Ministry of Education, May 2013 “Inquiry-based learning is an approach to teaching and learning that places students’questions, ideas and observations at the centre of the learning experience.”
  22. 22. Student questions? But what about the curriculum?
  23. 23. Student’s questions, theories and interests. Teacher’s agenda: accountability to curriculum and other responsibilities. Time to reflect and interpret observations of students.
  24. 24. T:S Questions
  25. 25. Interests and Theories
  26. 26. Accessibility Speak Selection
  27. 27. Safari as a Clean Reader demo
  28. 28. 6 Ideas to Get Going 1. Use an interesting fact, artifact or picture to provoke student questions and theories. 2. Improve your responses to students: • What makes you say that? • Where might we go next? 3. Slow down: Observe and Interpret.
  29. 29. 6 Ideas to Get Going (cont.) 4. Look for persistent interests. 5. Use previous activities to feed forward. 6. Help students make sense of Non-Fiction Text.
  30. 30. What might inquiry look like? Source: Sadie Hart https://www.flickr.com/photos/sadiehart/7613125774/
  31. 31. Accountability Documentation of: conversation observations student product
  32. 32. Accountability Documentation of: conversation observations student product student process
  33. 33. Assessing and Evaluating Inquiry • Evaluate on what they have learned based on day to day assessment. • Day to day evidence: daily scrub notes, short and long summaries, notebooks. • Evaluate open ended responses that require students to show their thinking and learning.
  34. 34. Ways to Assess Inquiry Assessing Thinking and Understanding (Harvey & Daniels, 2009; p.273) • Listen to students • Read students work • Confer with students • Listen in on conversations and record what they say • Observe behaviour and expressions • We capture student responses
  35. 35. Book Creator demo
  36. 36. 4 Ways to Document with iPad
  37. 37. Photos 4 Ways to Document with iPad
  38. 38. Photos Screenshots 4 Ways to Document with iPad
  39. 39. Photos Screenshots Videos 4 Ways to Document with iPad
  40. 40. Photos Screenshots Videos Screencasts 4 Ways to Document with iPad
  41. 41. Photos
  42. 42. Screenshots
  43. 43. Videos
  44. 44. Screencasts
  45. 45. Screencasts
  46. 46. Barriers and Roadblocks
  47. 47. Rubrics • The Challenge: How to get a report card mark from collaborative inquiry? • Potential Solution: Performance rubrics • Combine academic and learning skills
  48. 48. Thank you. Michelle Cordy @cordym hacktheclassroom.ca cordymich@gmail.com Lisa Morris @LisaLMorris morrisl@thamesvalleymail.ca

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