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Ozymandias

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The poem by Shelly, introducing vocabulary and discussion questions.

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Ozymandias

  1. 1. Ozymandias By Percy Shelley
  2. 2. Pre-reading <ul><li>What is your greatest achievement in your life so far? </li></ul><ul><li>What would you like people to remember about you in the future? </li></ul>
  3. 4. Who Was He? <ul><li>Ramesses II </li></ul><ul><li>The early part of his reign was focused on building cities, temples and monuments. He established the city of Pi-Ramesses in the Nile Delta </li></ul><ul><li>By the time of his death, aged about 90, years he had made Egypt rich from all the supplies and riches he had collected from other empires. </li></ul>
  4. 5. bare
  5. 6. boundless
  6. 7. decay
  7. 8. (to) despair
  8. 9. frown
  9. 10. mighty
  10. 11. mocked - to mock
  11. 12. passions
  12. 13. pedestal
  13. 14. remains
  14. 15. shattered
  15. 16. sneer
  16. 17. stamped
  17. 18. trunkless
  18. 19. wreck
  19. 20. wrinkled
  20. 21. bare
  21. 22. boundless
  22. 23. decay
  23. 24. (to) despair
  24. 25. frown
  25. 26. mighty
  26. 27. mocked - to mock
  27. 28. passions
  28. 29. pedestal
  29. 30. remains
  30. 31. shattered
  31. 32. sneer
  32. 33. stamped
  33. 34. trunkless
  34. 35. wreck
  35. 36. wrinkled
  36. 37. Ozymandias By Percy Bysshe Shelley
  37. 38. <ul><li>I met a traveler from an antique land </li></ul><ul><li>Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone </li></ul><ul><li>Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, </li></ul><ul><li>Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown </li></ul><ul><li>And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, </li></ul><ul><li>Tell that its sculptor well those passions read </li></ul><ul><li>Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, </li></ul><ul><li>The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: </li></ul><ul><li>And on the pedestal these words appear: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: </li></ul><ul><li>Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing beside remains. Round the decay </li></ul><ul><li>Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare </li></ul><ul><li>The lone and level sands stretch far away. </li></ul>
  38. 39. <ul><li>I met a traveler from an antique land </li></ul><ul><li>Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone </li></ul><ul><li>Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, </li></ul><ul><li>Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown </li></ul><ul><li>And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, </li></ul><ul><li>Tell that its sculptor well those passions read </li></ul><ul><li>Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, </li></ul><ul><li>The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: </li></ul><ul><li>And on the pedestal these words appear: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: </li></ul><ul><li>Look on my works, ye mighty , and despair !&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing beside remains . Round the decay </li></ul><ul><li>Of that colossal wreck , boundless and bare </li></ul><ul><li>The lone and level sands stretch far away. </li></ul>
  39. 40. Irony <ul><li>This poem is based on irony. </li></ul><ul><li>Irony is when your attempt to do something produces an opposite affect . </li></ul>It is ironic because none of the king's achievements have actually survived What is ironic about the boast inscribed on the pedestal? Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!' &quot;
  40. 41. <ul><li>Where do you think this conversation takes place? Is it the speaker's thoughts? What does this ambiguity contribute to the poem? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there any suggestion that the sculptor takes pride in his work? Justify your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>The traveler refers to the destroyed statue as a heap of &quot;lifeless things&quot;. Is it &quot;lifeless&quot; because it's in pieces, or it is &quot;trunkless“- Or is it &quot;lifeless&quot; because it's made of stone? </li></ul>
  41. 42. <ul><li>4. What words tell us that the poet had not personally witnessed the scene he is describing. </li></ul><ul><li>5. What is the theme of the Octave? </li></ul><ul><li>6. What is the theme of the sestet?  </li></ul>
  42. 43. Bridging Text and Context <ul><li>1. Can you think of any modern day leader who “fits the bill” of this poem. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Does this poem remind you of anything you have seen in your own experience? Explain your response. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Which leaders would you want to read this poem? </li></ul>
  43. 44. Post Reading Activity <ul><li>This statue, however, does not have &quot;two vast and trunkless legs of stone&quot;, nor does it have a &quot;shattered visage&quot; with a &quot;frown, wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>In fact, all statues of Egyptian kings have a uniform expression of serene benevolence. </li></ul><ul><li>Nor does the base of the statue at Thebes have any inscription, although Ramesses's cartouche is inscribed on the statue itself. </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozymandias </li></ul>
  44. 45. Post Reading Activity <ul><li>Knowing the facts, does this change how you feel about the poem? </li></ul><ul><li>Write a formal letter to Percy Shelly explaining how you feel about his misrepresentation of the facts. </li></ul>
  45. 46. Audio Description of Statue <ul><li>http:// www.britishmuseum.org/Files/ramesses.mp3 </li></ul>
  46. 47. Percy Bysshe Shelley <ul><li>English Romantic Poet </li></ul><ul><li>Percy Bysshe Shelley was born 4 August 1792 </li></ul><ul><li>He was brought up in privileged circumstances </li></ul><ul><li>In 1811 he eloped with Harriet Westbrook. </li></ul><ul><li>Sir Timothy refused ever to see his son again. </li></ul><ul><li>Percy and Harriet had daughter Lanthe and a son Charles </li></ul><ul><li>He left Harriet and ran off with Mary Goodwin who he later married and had a son from her named William </li></ul><ul><li>Shelley drowned in the Mediterranean Sea on 8 July 1822 </li></ul>

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