BayROC Ad Strategy

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Team A\'s Ad Strategy for the BayROC reusable bag ad campaign.

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BayROC Ad Strategy

  1. 1. Advertising Strategy TEAM A Make it a Habit and Grab it! reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable The New reusablestylishdurablecolorshape “It” Bag environmentprotectionstylereusable Is Your reusablestylishdurablecolorshape Reusable environmentprotectionstylereusable One! reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable reusablestylishdurablecolorshape Make It A Habit & Grab It! environmentprotectionstylereusable bayarearecycling.org reusablestylishdurablecolorshape environmentprotectionstylereusable The Advertising Strategy Report will summarize the findings of Team A!s marketing research. Compiled in this document, are results from secondary and The Marketing Team primary sources to help the marketing team discover Anna Aggeryd, Carolyn Hom, the impact of reusable bags on the target market!s Christina Mott, Dallas Tillman, everyday lives. Following data collection, the Nadzeya Nuselnikava, marketing team developed a creative brief for the Paul Ward production team. From there the production team The Creative Team generated concepts for BayROC!s advertising Chris McDougall, Sarah Mendoza, campaign to encourage the use of reusable bags. Crystal Marie Mitchell, Jose Ramirez, Elliot Roe, John Romo, Jeremy Wesler-Buck, Teri Yan, Rosanna Yung 

  2. 2. 
 Table
of
Contents
 I.
THE
PROBLEM
 3
 A.
 THE
KEY
FACT
 3
 B.
 ADVERTISING
OBJECTIVES
 3
 II.
THE
CREATIVE
PLATFORM
 4
 A.
THE
ISSUE:
USING
REUSABLE
BAGS
 4
 1.
THE
FACTS
ABOUT
REUSABLE
SHOPPING
BAG
USAGE
 4
 2.
CONSUMER
PERCEPTIONS
OF
THE
FACTS
ABOUT
DISPOSABLE
BAG
USAGE
 5
 B.
THE
TARGET
AUDIENCE
 6
 C.
THE
“COMPETITION”
 7
 D.
THE
MOST
COMPELLING
BENEFIT
WE
CAN
OFFER
TARGET
CONSUMERS
FOR
REMEMBERING
TO
USE
THEIR
 REUSABLE
BAGS
ON
EVERY
SHOPPING
TRIP
 8
 E.
WHY
SHOULD
THEY
BELIEVE
THIS?
 8
 F.
TONE
 9
 III.

THE
CREATIVE
BRIEF
 10
 A.
WHY
ARE
WE
ADVERTISING
AT
ALL?
 10
 B.
WHO
ARE
WE
TALKING
TO?
 10
 C.
WHAT
IS
THE
SINGLE
MOST
COMPELLING
IDEA
WE
NEED
TO
COMMUNICATE
TO
THEM?
 10
 D.
WHY
SHOULD
THEY
BELIEVE
THIS?
 10
 E.
DESIRED
BRAND
PERSONALITY/TONE?
 10
 APPENDIX
A:

MARKETING
REFERENCES
 11
 WORKS
CITED
 11
 INTERVIEW
QUESTIONS
 12
 APPENDIX
B:

SCRIPTS
 12
 TV
AD
#1:
“A
DAY
IN
THE
LIFE”
 13
 TV
AD
#2:
“THE
WALK”
 15
 TV
AD
#3:
“MY
REUSABLE
BAG”
 18
 RADIO
AD
#1:
“TESTOMONIALS”
 19
 RADIO
AD
#2:
“THE
ONE”
 20
 APPENDIX
C:

PRINT
ADS
 21
 APPENDIX
D:

CREDITS
 23
 2
  3. 3. I.
The
Problem
 
 1. The
Key
Fact
 
 Bay
Area
women
support
the
use
of
reusable
bags
but
need
to
be
motivated
to
bring
their
 own
reusable
bags
to
the
store
every
time.
 
 2. Advertising
Objectives
 
 • To
motivate
Bay
Area
women
to
bring
their
reusable
bags
to
the
store
at
all
times
and
 emphasize
the
personal
benefits
they
will
get
from
this
action.
 • To
have
an
upbeat
message
that
showcases
the
positive
aspects
of
using
a
reusable
 bag
as
it
pertains
to
self‐image
and
confidence.
 
 3
  4. 4. II.
The
Creative
Platform
 
 
 A.
The
Issue:
Using
Reusable
Bags
 
 1.
The
Facts
about
Reusable
Shopping
Bag
Usage
 
 
 
 Negative
Impact
of
Plastic
Bags
 
 • The
production
of
plastic
bags
requires
petroleum
and
often
natural
gas,
both
non‐ renewable
resources
that
increase
our
dependency
on
foreign
suppliers.
Additionally,
 prospecting
and
drilling
for
these
resources
contributes
to
the
destruction
of
fragile
 habitats
and
ecosystems
around
the
world.
 • The
energy
needed
to
manufacture
and
transport
disposable
bags
eats
up
more
 resources
and
creates
global
warming
emissions.
 • Plastic
bags
cause
over
100,000
sea
turtle
and
other
marine
animal
deaths
every
year
 when
animals
mistake
them
for
food
 • Approximately
60
‐
100
million
barrels
of
oil
are
required
to
make
the
world’s
plastic
 bags
each
year
 • Most
plastic
bags
take
over
400
years
to
decompose.
Some
figures
indicate
that
 plastic
bags
could
take
over
1000
years
to
break
down.
 • Collection,
hauling
and
disposal
of
plastic
bag
waste
create
an
additional
negative

 environmental
impact.
An
estimated
8
billion
pounds
of
plastic
bags,
wraps
and
sacks
 enter
the
waste
stream
every
year
in
the
US
alone,
putting
an
unnecessary
burden
on
 our
diminishing
landfill
space
and
causing
air
pollution
if
incinerated.

 
 *
Sources
found
at:
(Cobb,2008).
 
 
 Negative
Impact
of
Paper
Bags
 
 • Most
grocery
bag
paper
comes
from
tree
pulp,
so
the
impact
of
paper
bag
production
 on
forests
is
enormous.
In
1999,
14
million
trees
were
cut
to
produce
the
10
billion
 paper
grocery
bags
used
by
Americans
that
year
alone.
Paper
bag
production
delivers
 a
global
warming
double‐whammy
forests
(major
absorbers
of
greenhouse
gases)
 have
to
be
cut
down,
and
then
the
subsequent
manufacturing
of
bags
produces
 greenhouse
gases.
 • Paper
bags
generate
70%
more
air
and
50
times
more
water
pollutants
than
plastic
 bags
 • It
takes
four
times
as
much
energy
to
manufacture
a
paper
bag
as
it
does
to
 manufacture
a
plastic
bag.
 • quot;By
using
reusable
bags,
one
individual
can
save
up
to
6
plastic
bags
a
week
–
or
24
 bags
a
month
or
288
bags
a
year
or
22,176
bags
in
a
lifetime”(Reiss,
2008).




 • Some
studies
have
shown
that
paper
bags
generally
don’t
decompose
any
faster
in
 landfills
than
plastic
bags.
This
is
due
to
the
lack
of
water,
light
and
oxygen
etc,
in
 landfills
necessary
for
the
ideal
decomposing
environment.
 4
  5. 5. • Paper
bags
use
more
space
in
landfills
than
plastic
bags
 • The
majority
of
grocery
bag
paper
is
made
by
heating
wood
chips
under
pressure
at
 high
temperatures
in
a
chemical
solution.
As
evidenced
by
the
unmistakable
stench
 commonly
associated
with
paper
mills,
the
use
of
these
toxic
chemicals
contributes
to
 both
air
pollution,
such
as
acid
rain
and
water
pollution.
Millions
of
gallons
of
these
 chemicals
pour
into
our
waterways
each
year;
the
toxicity
of
the
chemicals
is
long‐ term
and
settles
into
the
sediments,
working
its
way
through
the
food
chain
(Cobb,
 2008).

 
 The
above
evidence
clearly
supports
the
argument
that
plastic
and
paper
bags
contribute
 negatively
towards
the
environment.

Thus
a
simple
and
easy
solution
to
this
problem
is
to
 use
reusable
bags.
 
 
 2.
Consumer
Perceptions
of
the
Facts
about
Disposable
Bag
Usage

 

 We
began
collecting
and
analyzing
secondary
research
to
develop
a
better
understanding
of
 consumers’
perceptions
of
disposable
and
reusable
bags.
For
this
purpose
we
focused
 primarily
on
the
study
titled,
Barriers
to
Behavior
Change
&
the
Application
of
Social
 Marketing
Tools,
which
provided
valuable
information
on
the
topic.
As
we
suspected
82%
of
 the
study’s
respondents
rated
plastic
bags’
impact
on
the
environment
as
significantly
 negative
and
nearly
94%
would
like
to
see
more
recycling
of
plastic
bags
in
the
grocery
 stores
(Reiss,
2008).

However,
many
have
a
hard
time
remembering
to
bring
their
reusable
 bags
every
time
they
shop.
Secondary
research
informed
us
that
consumers
know
they
 should
bring
reusable
bags
to
the
store
so
they
can
help
save
the
planet
and
contribute
to
a
 better
environment
for
themselves
and
their
children.
Nevertheless,
not
many
consumers
 are
aware
of
specific
facts
and
numbers
regarding
disposable
bags
effects
on
the
 environment.
For
instance
in
one
year
paper
bag
manufacturers
cut
down
14
million
trees,
 rushing
global
warming
and
destroying
our
planet
at
a
faster
rate
(Pogue,
2008).
We
believe
 that
public
knowledge
concerning
disposable
bags’
impact
on
the
environment
must
 increase
in
order
to
see
an
improvement
of
the
current
situation.



 
 In
order
to
find
out
how
consumers
feel
about
reusable
bags
we
conducted
field
research,
 which
consisted
of
short
interviews,
observation
and
in‐dept
interviews.
Through
our
 primary
research
we
discovered
that
environmental
concern
was
the
most
frequently
 discussed
topic
when
we
asked
women
why
they
use
reusable
bags,
followed
by
personal
 satisfaction,
individual
benefits
and
lastly
guilt.
 
 We
discovered
that
our
target
audience
is
aware
of
the
overall
negative
impact
that
plastic
 and
paper
bags
have
on
the
environment,
and
know
that
they
should
be
using
reusable
bags
 at
all
times.
Despite
their
understanding
of
the
situation
most
women
admit
to
forgetting
 their
bags.
Several
women
mentioned
during
our
in‐depth
interviews
that
they
used
 reusable
bags
because
of
environmental
concerns.
One
respondent
mentioned;
“by
using
my
 reusable
bag
it
feels
like
I
am
helping
the
environment”
while
another
woman
stated,
“The
 disposable
bags
will
be
around
much
longer
than
your
kids”.
The
majority
of
respondents
we
 interviewed
wanted
to
make
the
effort
to
remember
reusable
bags
because
they
feel
good
 about
using
them;
they
feel
as
if
they
are
doing
their
share
to
help
the
environment
while
 acting
as
role
models
for
their
children.

 5
  6. 6. 
 Our
respondents
also
talked
a
lot
about
achieving
personal
satisfaction
by
helping
the
 environment
and
obtaining
feelings
of
superiority
by
setting
a
good
example.
The
women
 also
frequently
mentioned
the
connection
between
the
bags
and
their
personal
sense
of
 fashion,
style
and
their
appearance.
They
discussed
the
many
different
styles,
colors
and
 materials
from
which
reusable
bags
are
made.
They
said
they
not
only
feel
good,
but
look
 good
while
using
them.
 
 Respondents
also
informed
us
that
the
individual
benefits
that
they
experience
when
using
 reusable
bags
are
important;
these
vary
for
each
individual
depending
on
one’s
needs
and
 priorities.
The
target
audience
mentioned
that
reusable
bags
hold
twice
as
many
items
as
 plastic
bags;
therefore
they
have
fewer
bags
to
carry.
The
bags
are
washable
and
will
be
with
 users
for
years
to
come.
Since
they
are
made
out
of
fabric
they
will
not
rip
or
tear
when
 boxes
lay
against
the
side
or
items
are
too
heavy.
The
handles
are
also
more
comfortable
for
 hands
and
are
built
to
hold
more
weight.
Another
plus
is
that
the
longer
handles/straps
can
 be
thrown
over
the
shoulder
so
that
the
wearer
may
carry
heavier
loads.
As
a
bonus
many
 stores
offer
incentives
such
as
money
off,
discounts,
and
rewards
when
their
customers
 bring
their
own
reusable
bags.
 
 During
our
discussions
about
disposable
bags
several
women
mentioned
feelings
of
guilt.
 This
was
an
important
issue
for
a
few
respondents.
They
felt
guilty
using
disposable
bags
 and
they
felt
guilty
when
forgetting
their
reusable
bags
at
home.
One
respondent
mentioned
 her
hate
towards
plastic
bags
drawing
attention
to
their
uncomfortable
handles
and
lack
of
 durability.
Many
consumers
use
disposable
bags
even
though
they
dislike
their
appearance,
 limitations,
flaws
and
impact
on
the
environment.
According
to
the
Waterloo
thesis,
only
3%
 of
respondents
reported
favoring
plastic
bags
(Reiss,
2008).
Even
though
the
majority
 dislikes
paper‐
and
plastic
bags,
600
disposable
bags
are
generated
every
second
in
 California
and
20
billion
bags
are
distributed
each
year
(Algalita
Marine
Research
 Foundation,
2009).

If
every
consumer
brings
at
least
one
reusable
bag
while
shopping,
it
 would
make
a
huge
impact
on
the
environment.

 
 B.
The
Target
Audience
 
 The
Bay
Area
population
is
extremely
diverse
with
little
over
half
of
the
population
being
 Caucasian,
with
an
additional
22%
being
of
Asian
descent.

We
can
also
assume
the
area
is
 well
educated
and
able
to
identify
the
negative
impacts
of
paper
and
plastic
bags
on
the
 environment
since
roughly
40%
of
the
population
holds
a
college
degree
or
higher.

With
 almost
half
of
Bay
Area
being
college
graduates,
the
median
Bay
Area
annual
household
 income
is
$73k,
which
is
$15k
higher
than
the
California
average.

Although
the
Bay
Area
is
 evenly
split
between
males
and
females,
studies
have
found
that
on
average
women
spend
 twice
as
much
time
grocery
shopping
as
men.

Taking
this
one
step
further
we
can
assume
 mothers
will
tend
to
buy
more
at
the
store
and
shop
more
frequently
to
provide
for
their
 families’
needs
(Hamrick
&
Shelley,
2005).

We
took
a
closer
look
at
the
size
the
market
of
 mothers
in
the
Bay
Area
to
determine
if
they
are
the
best
group
for
BayROC
to
target
with
 the
reusable
bag
campaign.

Families
with
children
under
18
accounted
for
31%
of
the
Bay
 Area
population
with
each
family
averaging
3.3
people.
Taking
this
into
consideration,
we
 want
to
target
the
roughly
565,000
women
aged
25
to
44,
who
will
likely
have
children
that
 6
  7. 7. are
old
enough
to
take
notice
of
their
habits
while
at
the
grocery
store
(Hearst
 Communications
Inc.,
2009).

Because
these
educated
mothers
have
the
ability
to
influence
 other
family
members,
we
believe
that
targeting
them,
will
lead
to
changes
in
their
own
 habits
as
well
as
those
of
their
family
members.

(Bay
Area
Census
).
 
 As
we
mentioned
earlier,
many
of
the
mothers
are
aware
of
the
negative
effects
of
non‐ reusable
bags,
but
are
still
having
difficulty
forming
the
habit
of
remembering
to
bring
their
 own
reusable
bags
to
the
store.


 
 By
talking
with
Bay
Area
mothers,
we
were
able
to
understand
that
personal
style
is
also
 extremely
important
to
them.

In
addition
to
their
willingness
to
be
eco‐friendly,
“our”
 mothers
also
want
to
be
in
tune
with
current
fashion
trends.

According
to
the
popular
press
 reusable
totes
are
the
nation’s
fastest‐growing
fashion‐accessory,
with
sales
up
from
last
 year
by
76%
(Gamerman,
2008).

Celebrities
are
now
using
reusable
bags
and
fashion
 designers
are
making
limited
editions,
for
which
customers
are
willing
to
pay
big
bucks.
 With
beautiful
and
hip
reusable
bags
to
choose
from,
these
mothers
will
not
have
to
forego
 fashion
to
help
the
environment.
Based
on
these
insights
we
believe
the
BayROC
ad
 campaign
should
focus
on
how
mothers
can
be
both
stylish
and
socially
responsible
by
 forming
the
habit
of
bringing
their
own
environmentally
friendly
bags
to
the
store.


 
 • English
speakers
 • Mothers
 • 25‐44
year
olds

 • Children
in
the
home
 • Middle
to
upper‐middle
class
 • Educated
 • Eco‐friendly

 • Fashionable
 
 Kat
is
a
40­year­old
married
mother
of
three
who
lives
in
the
Oakland
hills.

After
earning
 her
MBA
Kat
started
her
own
small
home
décor
company,
which
she
operates
out
of
her
 house.

Kat
dresses
hip
and
professional,
while
she
meets
with
artists
to
brainstorm
designs
 for
her
company.

She
started
having
children
at
the
age
of
30
and
now
juggles
the
three
 children’s
activities
with
her
business.

The
kids
are
now
between
the
ages
6­11
and
attend
 ballet,
piano
lessons,
and
soccer
practice
to
name
just
a
few.

Kat
owns
a
hybrid
and
tries
to
 do
what
she
can
for
the
environment,
but
often
is
in
a
rush.
She
shops
at
Safeway
and
other
 local
grocery
stores,
although
she
often
forgets
her
reusable
bags
at
home
if
they
are
not
 already
in
her
car.

She
needs
help
trying
to
form
the
habit
of
remembering
her
reusable
 bags
each
trip
to
the
store.


 
 C.
The
“Competition”
 
 Remembering
to
bring
reusable
bags
when
shopping
ultimately
comes
out
of
habit.
 However,
in
the
busy
lives
of
our
target
audience,
stylish
mothers
from
the
Bay
Area
who
 work
and
have
an
average
house
hold
incomes
of
$73K
+,
establishing
a
new
habit
in
their
 lives
is
difficult.

 
 
 7
  8. 8. These
women’s
hectic
work/life
schedules
are
a
major
obstacle
to
forming
new
habits
 without
significant
motivational
forces
(reinforcement
factors).
It
has
been
said
that
working
 mothers
have
two
full
time
jobs
–
the
money
making
job
and
caring
for
her
family.
Typically,
 eight
hours
a
day
are
devoted
to
business
related
work.
The
rest
of
the
time,
mothers
must
 worry
about
feeding
their
families,
getting
their
children
to
and
from
school,
sports
games,
 parties,
and
the
overall
well
being
of
their
families.
Their
routines
are
so
hectic
that
creating
 a
new
habit
within
them
is
extremely
difficult.

 
 
 The
availability
of
paper
and
plastic
grocery
bags
is
motivation
to
continue
to
accept
 disposable
bags
instead
of
encouraging
the
woman
to
bring
her
own.
The
availability
of
 disposable
bags
at
grocery
stores
is
a
safety
net
for
many
women,
assuring
them
that
“it
is
 okay
to
have
forgotten
today,
there
is
always
next
time.”
 
 
 Since
bringing
your
own
bag
is
not
required
by
law,
there
are
no
consequences
for
not
 bringing
your
own
bag
when
you
shop
and
without
consistent
reinforcement
and
threat
of
 punishment,
people
will
not
change
as
quickly.

 
 
 Positive
reinforcement
to
bring
your
own
bag
to
grocery
stores
is
helpful,
however,
the
 rewards
for
this
behavior
are
insignificant
to
most
people,
especially
at
this
level
of
income.
 In
many
larger
grocery
retail
chains,
patrons
receive
five
to
ten
cents
off
their
purchase
per
 bag
brought.
These
savings
off
a
typical
grocery
store
purchase
of
hundreds
of
dollars
 amounts
to
a
savings/return
of
less
than
1%
per
trip.
This
is
only
a
small
incentive
to
bring
 your
own
bag
to
shop
and
many
people
find
it
too
small
to
be
worth
the
trouble.

 
 
 The
lack
of
knowledge
of
the
negative
effects
provides
little
motivation
to
change
habits
and
 have
a
positive
impact
on
something
that
affects
people
on
a
global
scale.
Many
people
 “know”
that
plastic
bags
ending
up
in
landfills
are
bad
but
often
assume
that
paper
bags
are
 an
acceptable
alternative.
Paper
bags
may
break
down
in
an
ideal
environment
more
quickly
 than
plastic
bags,
however
people
do
not
consider
the
entire
life
cycle
from
cradle
to
grave,
 and
fail
to
see
how
harmful
the
production
of
paper
bags
can
be
to
the
world’s
air
quality.

 
 
 D.
The
Most
Compelling
Benefit
We
Can
Offer
Target
Consumers
for
 Remembering
to
Use
Their
Reusable
Bags
on
every
Shopping
Trip
 
 By
making
it
a
habit
to
bring
reusable
bags
to
the
store,
one
can
express
their
individual
style
 and
achieve
a
higher
level
of
personal
satisfaction
from
helping
the
environment.
 
 E.
Why
Should
they
Believe
This?
 
 As
we
see
from
previous
sections
most
consumers
do
possess
an
understanding
of
the
 harmful
consequences
of
plastic
bags
on
the
environment
and
they
are
willing
to
make
 changes
but
find
it
difficult
to
change
their
behavior.

We
believe
that
by
offering
the
target
 audience
the
stronger
personal
impetus,
which
is
not
only
the
personal
satisfaction
of
 helping
the
environment
but
also
a
way
to
express
their
personal
style
and
personality,
we
 can
motivate
them
to
change
their
behavior.
 8
  9. 9. 
 
 By
using
reusable
bags
women
get
personal
satisfaction
by
feeling
superior.
Women
feel
 empowered
to
be
a
part
of
an
environmentally
concerned
community
through
which
they
 are
not
only
able
to
contribute
to
a
bigger
cause
but
also
provide
a
good
example
for
their
 children.

 
 
 By
using
reusable
bags,
Bay
Area
Moms
will
help
the
environment
as
well
as
have
a
great
 opportunity
to
express
themselves
through
their
choice
of
reusable
shopping
bags,
to
show
 their
intelligence,
responsibility
and
sense
of
fashion.
We
offer
them
another
chance
to
look
 good
and
feel
good.
There
are
a
lot
of
different
reusable
bags
on
the
market
right
know,
 which
range
from
budget
friendly
Chico
bags
to
Louis
Vuitton
$1000
shopping
bags.
There
 are
different
styles
and
fabrics,
such
as
organic
cotton
reusable
bags.
Some
sites
like
 BagsOnTheRun.com,
give
a
possibility
to
put
one’s
own
logo
and
statement
on
the
reusable
 shopping
bag.
One
can
find
a
suitable
size
and
shape.
There
are
some,
like
Breezy
Bags,
 which
are
five
tiny
reusable
shopping
bags
in
one
small
pouch
the
size
of
a
soda
can.
There
 are
over
three
thousand
different
sites,
where
an
individual
can
purchase
a
bag
that
suits
his
 or
her
individual
preference.
 
 
 F.
Tone

 
 The
feel
of
the
ads
should
be
upbeat
and
show
today’s
women
in
modern
settings
using
 reusable
bags
that
match
their
own
individual
sense
of
style.

We
are
trying
to
communicate
 a
sense
of
being
confident,
intelligent
and
responsible
while
remaining
true
to
the
women
 themselves
in
regards
to
fashion.

Each
one
of
these
women
makes
fashion
statements
and
 choices
that
trickle
down
to
each
woman’s
individual
reusable
bag.

 
 The
ads
should
be
colorful
representing
a
positive
outlook
and
highlight
the
women
in
a
way
 that
shows
off
their
fashion
sense.

To
get
this
point
across
we
suggest
the
message
be
 brought
by
women
who
look
like
the
women
we
are
targeting
or
what
they
would
like
to
be
 perceived
as.

Women
should
dominate
the
ads
as
to
not
create
confusion
as
to
who
the
ads
 are
targeting
and
male
activity
in
the
ads
should
be
kept
to
a
minimum.
 
 The
ads
should
be
positive
and
shouldn’t
involve
facts
about
the
negative
impacts
of
not
 using
a
reusable
bag.

The
point
of
the
ads
should
not
be
to
try
and
convince
these
women
 that
using
a
reusable
bag
is
good
for
the
environment
but
that
they
can
use
one
and
look
 responsible
and
intelligent
while
still
remaining
unique
and
stylish.
 
 9
  10. 10. III.

The
Creative
Brief
 
 
 A.
Why
are
we
advertising
at
all?
 
 To
remind
people
to
bring
their
reusable
bags
to
the
store
at
all
times
and
emphasize
what
 personal
benefits
they
can
get
from
this
action.
 
 B.
Who
are
we
talking
to?

 
 We
are
talking
to
stylish
Bay
Area
moms
(30+)
who
are
on
the
go
and
care
about
their
self
 image
and
various
fashion
trends.
These
mothers
are
aware
of
the
broad
negative
 environmental
impact
of
using
disposable
bags
(paper
and
plastic),
own
reusable
shopping
 bags,
but
often
forget
to
bring
them.
 
 C.
What
is
the
single
most
compelling
idea
we
need
to
communicate
to
 them?
 
 By
making
it
a
habit
to
bring
reusable
bags
to
the
store,
one
can
express
their
individual
style
 and
achieve
a
higher
level
of
personal
satisfaction
from
helping
the
environment.

 
 Reusable
Bags
=
style
+
bonus
of
helping
the
environment
 
 D.
Why
should
they
believe
this?
 
 • It
takes
1000
years
for
a
plastic
bag
to
break
down
in
ideal
decomposing
conditions
 (complete
with
air,
water,
and
light)
with
Americans
using
380
billion
of
these
each
 year
 • It
takes
14
million
trees
to
produce
10
billion
paper
bags
that
are
used
by
Americans
 every
year
 o by
helping
to
decrease
these
startling
numbers
mothers
can
also
be
stylish
by
 purchasing
reusable
bags
from
some
of
the
following
websites:
 o http://shesabetty.typepad.com

 o www.bringyourownbag.ca

 
 • From
high
end
bags
by
Louis
Vuitton
to
low
end
bags
from
grocery
stores,
everyone
is
 encouraging
the
public
to
go
green
and
there
is
bound
to
be
a
bag
out
there
that
can
 suit
each
individuals
preferences


 
 E.
Desired
brand
personality/tone?
 
 Positive,
colorful,
rewarding,
superior,
confident,
intelligent,
responsible,
sexy
 
 10
  11. 11. Appendix
A:

Marketing
References
 
 Works
Cited
 
 (n.d.).
Retrieved
April
2009,
from
Bags
on
the
Run:
http://www.bagsontherun.com
 Algalita
Marine
Research
Foundation.
(2009).
Trashed:
Plastic,
Plastic
Everywhere.
Retrieved
 April
2009,
from
Algalita
Marine
Research
Foundation:
http://algalita.org
 Bay
Area
Census
.
(n.d.).
San
Francisco
Bay
Area.
Retrieved
April
2009,
from
Bay
Area
 Census:
http://www.bayareacensus.ca.gov/bayarea.htm
 City
of
Palo
Alto.
(n.d.).
Zero
Waste
Program.
Retrieved
April
2009,
from
City
of
Palo
Alto:
 Http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/depts/pwd/recycle/news/details.asp?NewsID=987& TargetID=151

 Cobb,
V.
(2008,
Janurary
16th).
Key
Facts
of
Reusable
bags.
Retrieved
April
15th,
2009,
from
 ReusableBags:
http://www.reusablebags.com/facts.php
 Dye,
J.
L.
(2008,
August).
Fertility
of
American
Women:
2006.
Retrieved
April
27,
2009,
from
 U.S.
Census
Bureau:
http://www.census.gov/prod/2008pubs/p20‐558.pdf
 Gamerman,
E.
(2008,
September
26).
An
Inconvenient
Bag.
The
Wall
Street
Journal
,
p.
W1.
 Hamrick,
K.,
&
Shelley,
J.
K.
(2005,
November).
How
Much
Time
Do
Americans
Spend
 Preparing
and
Eating
Food?
Retrieved
April
18,
2009,
from
Amber
Waves:
 http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/November05/DataFeature/
 Hearst
Communications
Inc.
(2009).
Bay
Area
Market.
(San
Francisco
Chronicle)
Retrieved
 April
28,
2009,
from
SF
Gate:
 http://www.sfgate.com/chronicle/advertise/sevenday1.html
 Pogue,
D.
(2008,
August
28).
The
Bottom
Line
of
the
Eco
Balance
Sheet.
Retrieved
April
2009,
 from
The
New
York
Times:
http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/28/the‐ bottom‐line‐of‐the‐eco‐balance‐ sheet/?scp=6&sq=paper%20bags%20pollution&st=cse

 Reiss,
A.
(2008,
April
7).
University
of
Waterloo.
Retrieved
February
2009,
from
 Barriers
to
Behaviour
Change
&
the
Application
of
Social
Marketing
Tools

:
 http://www.fes.uwaterloo.ca/ers/research/490s/documents/AReiss490sThesis.pdf
 11
  12. 12. Interview
Questions
 
 1.
How
often
do
you
use
a
reusable
bag?
 

 2.
Why?
(Ask
this
in
order
to
figure
out
what
are
the
benefits
of
its
use
are
to
them)
 

 3.
Why
do
you
think
it
is
hard
or
easy*
(easy
if
they
always
do)
to
remember
to
bring
a
 reusable
bag?
 
 4.
What
do
you
think
about
people
who
use
reusable
bags?
 
 
 Additional
Questions
for
In­depth
Interviews
(In
no
particular
order)
 
 5.
How
do
you
feel
about
paper
and
plastic
bags?
 
 6.
What
made
you
start
using
reusable
bags?
 
 7.

What
qualities
do
you
look
for
when
choosing
a
reusable
bag?
 
 8.

Do
you
feel
like
you’re
children
motivate
you
to
use
reusable
bags?
 
 9.

How
do
you
remember
to
bring
your
reusable
bags
to
the
store?
 
 10.

What
problems
do
you
encounter
while
using
your
reusable
bags?
 12
  13. 13. Appendix
B:

Scripts

 
 TV
Ad
#1:
“A
Day
in
the
Life”

 
 The
purpose
of
this
ad
is
to
show
the
individual
style
that
can
be
reflected
by
 reusable
bags.
This
ad
will
use
strong
visuals
and
unique
transitions
to
 showcase
the
fashion
and
individuality
of
the
bags
while
achieving
a
higher
 level
of
personal
satisfaction.
 VIDEO
 AUDIO

 POV
MS:
MARRIED
MOM
(Woman
1)
 MUSIC
 APPROACHES
COUNTER,
PICKS
UP
 MARRIED
MOM:
Sometimes
it’s
hard
 HER
REUSABLE
BAGS;
HUSBAND
IS
 to
juggle
everything
at
once.
Everyday
 BEHIND
AT
THE
KITCHEN
TABLE.
 is
a
different
routine.
 ZOOM
INTO
DOOR.
 POV
MS:
CAREER
WOMAN
(Woman
2)
 CAREER
WOMAN:
Different
meetings
 WALKING
OUT
OF
HER
OFFICE
 to
attend.
 BIULDING,
REUSEABLE
BAG
IN
TOW.
 ANOTHER
PERSON
WALKS
THROUGH
 THE
FRAM
WIPING
THE
SHOT
 POV
MS:
SINGLE
WOMAN
(Woman
3)
 SINGLE
WOMAN:
Different
places
to
 WALKING
TOWORDS
A
RECORD
 explore.

 STORE
WITH
HER
REUSEABLE
BAG,
 READY
TO
BE
USED.
ZOOM
INTO
THE
 BAG.
 CU:
OF
THE
BAG
BEING
LOADED
 
 WITH
GROCERIES.
THE
CAMERA
 ZOOMS
OUT
TO
REVEAL
MARRIED
 MOM
AT
THE
GROCERY
STORE
 CHECKING
OUT.
WHEN
THE
BAG
IS
 ALL
PACKED
UP,
SHE
PICKS
IT
UP
 AND
WALKS
TOWARDS
THE
CAMERA
 UNTIL
THE
BAG
FILL
THE
ENTIRE
 FRAME.

 CU:
THE
BAG
FILLING
THE
ENTIRE
 
 FRAME
THAN
PULLS
OUT
AS
CAREER
 WOMAN
WALKS
OUT
OF
A
BOUTIQUE
 13
  14. 14. WITH
HER
REUSABLE
BAG
FULL
OF
 CLOTHES.
SHE
STOPS
ON
THE
 CORNER
AS
A
BUS
DRIVES
BY
WIPING
 THE
FRAME

 LS:
SINGLE
GIRL
CROSSING
THE
 
 STREET
TOWARDS
CAMERA
WITH
 HER
BAG
ENTERING
 AMOEBA/RASPUTIN.
SHE
WALKS
 INTO
THE
FRAME
CREATING
A
 NATURAL
DIP
TO
COLOR.
 MS:
CAREER
WOMAN
WALKING
 CAREER
WOMAN:
But
the
one
thing.
 AWAY
FROM
CAMERA.
CAMERA
PANS
 PAST
A
STORE
DISPLAY
THAT
WIPES
 THE
FRAME
 MS:
SINGLE
WOMAN
PULLS
OUT
A
 SINGLE
WOMAN:
That
always
gets
me
 VINYL
RECORD
AND
PUTS
THE
BAG
 through
the
day.

 DOWN
IN
FRONT
OF
THE
CAMERA.
 POV
MS:
MARRIED
MOM
RETURNS
TO
 MARRIED
MOM:
Is
my
bag.

 KITCHEN.
SHE
IS
UNLOADING
HER
 BAG
ON
THE
COUNTER.

 CU:
MARRIED
MOM’S
REUSABLE
BAG.

 FEMALE
ANNCR:
Make
it
a
habit
and
 CG:
BAYROC
LOGO
WITH
TEXT.
 grab
it.

 
 
 
 14
  15. 15. TV
Ad
#2:
“Breaking
the
Habit/
The
Walk”
 

 The
purpose
of
this
ad
is
to
show
how
using
the
reusable
bag
can
simplify
a
 woman’s
life.
This
ad
focuses
on
the
change
in
habit
needed
to
make
a
 difference,
and
a
call
to
action
that
also
demonstrates
its
rewards.
This
targets
 the
Bay
Area
woman
who
own
reusable
bags
and
do
not
actively
use
them.
The
 objective
is
to
lead
the
audience
[into
using
their
bags]
by
example,
and
to
 visually
imply
how
fashionable
it
is
to
use
their
bag.
 
 VIDEO
 AUDIO
 MS:
WOMAN
WAKES
UP.
 MUSICAL
PHRASE
 
 OTS:
WOMAN
PULLS
ON
A
T‐SHIRT
 
 
 MS:
WOMAN
GRABS
HER
LUNCH
IN
 
 HER
HANDS,
NO
BAG.
 

 FS:
WOMAN
LOOKS
IN
THE
MIRROR,
 
 SIGHS
 
 CU:
WOMAN
WALKS
OUT
OF
HOUSE;
 
 WOMAN
IS
NOT
FEELING
CONFIDENT
 
 MS:
WOMAN
WAKES
UP
 MUSICAL
PHRASE
 
 OTS:
WOMAN
IN
FRONT
OF
MIRROR
 
 HOLDING
UP
A
DIFFERENT
TWO
 BLOUSES.
 
 CU:
PACKS
HER
LUNCH
IN
A
PLASTIC
 
 BAG.
 
 FS:
LOOKS
AT
HERSELF
HOLDING
THE
 
 PLASTIC
BAG
WITH
HER
SEMI‐CUTE
 OUTFIT.

SIGHS.
 
 
 15
  16. 16. FS:
WOMAN
WALKS
OUT
OF
HOUSE;
 
 WOMAN
IS
NOT
FEELING
CONFIDENT
 
 
 CU:
WOMAN’S
DISSATISFIED
FACE.
 
 
 MS:
WOMAN
WAKES
UP.
 MUSIC
 
 OTS:
WOMAN
STANDING
IN
FRONT
OF
 
 MIRROR
IN
A
SUIT,
SMILING
AT
HOW
 GOOD
SHE
LOOKS.
 
 CU:
PACKS
HER
LUNCH
IN
A
REUSABLE
 
 BAG.
 FS:
LOOKS
AT
HERSELF
HOLDING
THE
 
 REUSABLE
BAG
WITH
HER
VERY
 STYLISH
OUTFIT.
SMILES
 CONFIDENTLY
IN
THE
MIRROR.
 
 FS:
WOMAN
LEAVING
HER
HOUSE
 
 WITH
HER
REUSABLE
BAG.
 
 CU:
WOMAN
ARRIVES
AT
WORK
WITH
 
 HER
REUSABLE
BAG.

 
 FS:
PEOPLE
GLANCING
AT
WOMAN
AS
 MUSICAL
PHRASE,
BUT
DIFFERENT
 SHE
PASSES.
 FROM
PREVIOUS
ONE
 
 CU:
THE
CLOSET
WITH
THE
BAGS
 
 BEING
SWEPT
AWAY
TO
MAKE
ROOM
 FOR
THE
NEW
REUSABLE
BAG.
 
 MS:
WOMAN
LOOKING
SATISFIED,
LIKE
 
 SHE
HAS
ACCOMPLISHED
A
GOAL.
 
 FS:
WOMAN
GRABS
THE
NEW
BAG
AND
 
 WALKS
TO
THE
DOOR.
 
 16
  17. 17. CU:
THE
REUSABLE
BAG
SWINGING
ON
 VO:
Find
a
bag
that
means
something
 HER
ARM.
 to
you.
 FS:
WOMAN
WALKING
DOWN
THE
 VO:
A
reusable
bag
helps
you
stylishly
 STREET
WITH
HER
BAG.
A
MAN
DOES
A
 express
yourself.

 DOUBLE
TAKE
OR
STOPS
TO
WATCH
 HER
PASS.
 
 LS:
WOMAN
ENTERS
THE
STORE
WITH
 VO:
This
has
been
a
message
from
 REUSABLE
BAGS.
 BayROC
reminding
you
to.
 
 
 CG:
BAYROC
LOGO
WITH
TEXT
 VO:
Make
it
a
habit
and
grab
it.
 
 
 
 17
  18. 18. TV
Ad
#3:
“My
Reusable
Bag”
 
 The
purpose
of
this
ad
is
to
show
why
and
how
different
individuals
use
their
 reusable
bags.
This
is
a
montage
of
different
people
talking
about
their
bags
 and
what
they
like
about
them.
We
will
include
the
fashion
aspect
through
 visual
elements
in
the
commercial
(i.e.,
talent’s
clothing;
design
on
the
bag;
and
 the
location).
 
 VIDEO
 AUDIO
 MS:
SUBURBAN
HOUSEWIFE
IN
FRONT
 MUSIC
 OF
WHOLE
FOODS
IN
MARIN.
 
 
 HOUSEWIFE:

I
use
my
reusable
bag
 because.
 MS:
YOUNG
HIP
GUY
IN
FRONT
OF
 YOUNG
HIP
GUY:
Because
it’s
a
habit.
 SAFEWAY
IN
THE
CASTRO.
 
 MS:
OLDER
WOMAN
IN
FRONT
OF
 OLDER
WOMAN:
For
my
grandchildren.
 BERKELEY’S
RASPUTIN.
 
 MS:
HOUSEWIFE
IN
FRONT
OF
WHOLE
 HOUSEWIFE:
Confidence.
 FOODS.

 
 MS:
MOTHER
WITH
KIDS
IN
FRONT
OF
 MOTHER:
I
do
it
because
it’s
stylish.
 GROCERY
STORE
IN
SAN
JOSE.
 
 CU:
HOUSEWIFE
SMILING.
 VO:
Though
a
reusable
bag
means
 different
things
to
different
people.

 
 CU:
YOUNG
HIP
GUY
SMILING.
 VO:
A
reusable
bag
is
the
way
to
express
 
 yourself.

 CU:
OLDER
WOMAN
SMILING.
 
 CU:
MOTHER
WITH
KIDS
IN
FRONT
OF
 VO:
Make
it
a
habit
and
grab
it.
 GROCERY
STORE
IN
SAN
JOSE.
 
 CG:
BAYROC
LOGO
WITH
TEXT.
 
 
 18
  19. 19. Radio
Ad
#1:
“Testimonials”

 
 SFX:
Grocery
store
background.

 YOUNG
WOMAN:
I
use
reusable
 
 bags
because.

 
 
 
 OLDER
WOMAN:
They’re
stylish.

 
 
 
 YOUNG
MAN:
Durable.

 
 
 SFX:
Playground
with
kids.

 CHILD:
Mine
has
awesome
cartoons
 
 on
it!

 
 
 
 WOMAN:
I
use
reusable
bags
 SFX:
Distant
ambient
noise.

 because
they
are
environmentally
 friendly.

 
 ALL:
(EXCITED,
PROUD)
It’s
a
good
 habit!

 
 FEMALE
ANNCR:
Whatever
your
 reason
for
using
reusable
bags:
 Make
it
a
habit
and
grab
it.

 
 A
message
from
the
Bay
Area
 Recycling
Outreach
Coalition.

 
 19
  20. 20. Radio
Ad
#2:
“The
One”

 
 SFX:
The
sounds
of
a
grocery
store
 ANNE:
Jen,
I've
been
looking
for
a
 in
the
background‐
the
beeps
from
 while,
and
I
think....
I
think
I've
 the
register.

 finally
found
the
one!
 
 
 
 JEN:
(DELIGHTED)
That’s
great!
 
 Tell
me
more!

 
 
 
 ANNE:
What
can
I
say!

This
one's
 
 got
it
all!

Strong,
handy,
always
 
 there
for
me...
 
 
 
 JEN:
Oooh,
how
exciting!
What're
 
 we
talking
about
in
the
looks
 
 department?

 
 
 
 ANNE:
Oh,
you
should
see
me
 
 walking
down
the
street
with
this
 
 one
in
tow.

Everyone's
totally
 
 jealous.

 
 
 SFX:
Grocery
store
music

 JEN:

Sounds
awesome!
What's
their
 name?
 
 ANNE:
(CONFUSED)
Name?
No,
no,
 sweetie.
I’m
talking
about
my
 environmentally
friendly
reusable
 bag!

 
 FEMALE
ANNCR:
Reusable
bags
 might
not
be
a
replacement
for
an
 (EMPHASIZE)
actual
relationship,
 but
we
promise
they’ll
make
your
 shopping
trips
a
whole
lot
better!

 Make
it
a
habit
and
grab
it.

 A
message
from
the
Bay
Area
 Recycling
Outreach
Coalition.

 
 
 20
  21. 21. Appendix
C:

Print
Ads
 21
  22. 22. Print ad 2 22
  23. 23. Appendix
D:

Credits
 
 
 Account
Planning
and
Research
Team
 
 Anna
Aggeryd
 Carolyn
Hom
 Christina
Mott
 Dallas
Tillman
 Nadzeya
Huselnikava
 Paul
Ward
 
 
 Creative
Team
 
 Producer:
 Teri
Yan
 
 Director:
 Chris
MacDougall
 
 Associate
Producer:
 Sarah
Mendoza
 
 Copywriters:
 Jeremy
Wesler‐Buck
 Elliot
Roe
 
 Art
Directors:
 Crystal
Marie
Mitchell
 Jose
Ramirez
 
 Director
of
Videography:
 Jeremy
Wesler‐Buck
 
 Lighting
Director:
 John
Romo
 
 Audio
Team:
 Matt
Bernot
 Chris
Hardy
 Oscar
Su
 John
Romo
 
 Editors:
 Rosanna
Yung
 Teri
Yan
 Chris
MacDougall
 
 23
  24. 24. Assistant
Director:
 Elliot
Roe
 
 Production
Assistant:
 Rosanna
Yung
 
 Acting
Talent:
 Candy
Churilla
 Kelly
Hunter
 Christina
Kim
 Dawn
Troupe‐Masi
 
 Voice
Talent:
 Candy
Churilla
 Christina
Kim
 Deborah
May
 
 Music
Producer:
 J.D.
Calloway
 
 Special
Thanks:
 Jamie
Falletti
 Falletti
Grocery
Store
 Diesel
Bookstore
 The
Feagley
Family
 
 Special
Thanks:
 Ricardo
Gomes,
Chair
DAI
 Jeff
Jacoby,
BECA
 Scott
Patterson,
Chair
BECA
 Jeff
Rosenstock,
BECA
Equipment
Room
 Lena
Zhang,
BECA
 
 
 ­­BAYROC­­
 
 Executive
Producers:
 Hamid
Khani
 Kathy
O’Donnell
 
 
 24

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