HHIS403 - Political & Social Movements in TwentiethCentury Ireland
The Irish Labour Movement, 1889 – 1924
 

Lecture Four:...
May 1877 – “In the house of Lords, t he Duke of St. Albans had moved the second
reading of a bill which would have restric...
May 1877 – “In the house of Lords, t he Duke of St. Albans had moved the second
reading of a bill which would have restric...
23 January 1891 - House of Commons debate ends with the following resolution:
“That in the opinion of this House the emplo...
“In the future we are not going to have the rank and file crawling into
the office to any body of railway directors. We ar...
The company has had frequent strikes of various kinds
in the last few years, and the board are now firmly
determined in th...
2. 1913 lockout
http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/Dublin_1913Strike_and_Lockout
26 August 1913. The strike begins.
28 August. Larkin and other lab...
1 September. Jacobs shut down part of its factory because of a strike by members of the
ITGWU. Rioting broke out in Redmon...
4 September. A labourer named John Byrne died from injuries received during rioting on
Saturday night, 30 August.
5 Septem...
9 September. The Dublin Building Trades Employers’ Federation adopted unanimously a
resolution not to employ members of th...
15 September. Another
conference took place
between employers, workers,
and English trade unionists,
but ended in failure....
25 September. Troops were
drafted in to protect property.
26 September. The
Government Board of Trade
appointed George Ask...
29 September. The Askwith
Commission of Inquiry into the
causes of the Lockout began.
2 & 3 October. Employers gave
eviden...
6 October. The Court of Inquiry concluded. Askwith recommended that a Conciliation
Committee be set up, to hear the case o...
16 October. A crowd of about 4000 striking
workers marched through the city to protest at
the employers’ statement.
20 Oct...
2. Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army
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4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army

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1913 lockout and Irish Citizen Army

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4. The 1913 Lockout and the Irish Citizen Army

  1. 1. HHIS403 - Political & Social Movements in TwentiethCentury Ireland The Irish Labour Movement, 1889 – 1924   Lecture Four: The 1913 Lockout & the Irish Citizen Army
  2. 2. May 1877 – “In the house of Lords, t he Duke of St. Albans had moved the second reading of a bill which would have restricted the employment of railwaymen to twelve hours in every twenty-four, except where unforseen circumstances rendered longer employmenr necessary. The purpose of the bill was to limit only the houes of those engaged in working the traffic, since the main concern of its sponsors was to protect the travelling public from the dangers of accidents arising from the employment of tired railwaymen. Even so this modest proposal was strenupusly opposed by other peers… On account of this opposition the bill was withdrawn and no further attempt was made to limit working hours of ralwaymen for over a decade.” (Bagwell, 153)
  3. 3. May 1877 – “In the house of Lords, t he Duke of St. Albans had moved the second reading of a bill which would have restricted the employment of railwaymen to twelve hours in every twenty-four, except where unforseen circumstances rendered longer employmenr necessary. The purpose of the bill was to limit only the houes of those engaged in working the traffic, since the main concern of its sponsors was to protect the travelling public from the dangers of accidents arising from the employment of tired railwaymen. Even so this modest proposal was strenupusly opposed by other peers… On account of this opposition the bill was withdrawn and no further attempt was made to limit working hours of ralwaymen for over a decade.” (Bagwell, 153) July 1889 – the ASRS adopts a national programme at its AGM in Hull. It included “ a guaranteed weekly wage, a ten-hour day (except for platelayers, nine hours, and some shunters and signalmen, eight hours) and overtime at time and a quarter and Sunday duty at time and a half rates,” (Bagwell, p.132)
  4. 4. 23 January 1891 - House of Commons debate ends with the following resolution: “That in the opinion of this House the employment of railway servants for excessive hours is a source of danger both to the men themselves and to the travelling public, and that a select committee be appointed to inquire whether, and if so in what way, the hours worked by railway servants should be restricted by legislation.”
  5. 5. “In the future we are not going to have the rank and file crawling into the office to any body of railway directors. We are going to maintain a bold front. Men of skill who have training that qualifies them to speak on behalf of their fellows would GO TO THE DIRECTORS AND ARGUE THE CASE OF THE MEN, and if we cannot then succeed in getting what we want, we can have recourse to the method that has been successful on this occasion. What is now annoying the directors is the growing spirit of solidarity amongst the working classes, and they don’t know how to deal with it.” (Irish Worker, 26 August 1911)
  6. 6. The company has had frequent strikes of various kinds in the last few years, and the board are now firmly determined in the interests of the general public, the traders of the country, their own employees, and the shareholders, that the industry of this country is not to be paralysed like this again, and are determined at any cost to re-man the system, and they hope that the majority of their old employees will tender their application at once, and that a lasting peace may ensue... I sincerely regret that you should have been led into such a mistake, which has cost the country so heavily, and trust you will now immediately accept the olive branch we hold out to you. Goulding, 28 September 1911
  7. 7. 2. 1913 lockout
  8. 8. http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/Dublin_1913Strike_and_Lockout 26 August 1913. The strike begins. 28 August. Larkin and other labour leaders were arrested . Released later that day. 29 August. Official proclamation issued prohibiting the proposed meeting in Sackville St on 31 August. Great meeting in Beresford Place. Before 10,000 people, Larkin burned the Government proclamation prohibiting the gathering. 30 August. Police baton-charge crowd on O’Connell St and Eden Quay. James Nolan dies from head injuroes 31 August. Imperial Hotel, in disguise, to address the huge crowd assembled. He was immediately arrested, and a riot followed.
  9. 9. 1 September. Jacobs shut down part of its factory because of a strike by members of the ITGWU. Rioting broke out in Redmond’s Hill, in surrounding areas, and in other parts of the city. 2 September. The Dublin Coal Merchants’ Association locked out members of the ITGWU. Two tenement houses collapsed in Church Street, causing the immediate death of seven persons and serious injury to others. 3 September. William Martin Murphy addressed a meeting of about 400 employers, and persuaded them to act against the ITGWU. The employers drew up an agreement that pledged not to employ members of the ITGWU, and to sack those who refused to accept this decision. Thousands attended the funeral of James Nolan.
  10. 10. 4 September. A labourer named John Byrne died from injuries received during rioting on Saturday night, 30 August. 5 September. A conference was held between employers, workers, and English trade unionists to try to resolve the dispute, without success.
  11. 11. 9 September. The Dublin Building Trades Employers’ Federation adopted unanimously a resolution not to employ members of the ITGWU, and dismissed workers who did not accept this decision. 12 September. Farmers in Co. Dublin gave notice to labourers who belonged to the ITGWU. Members of the Dublin Carriers’ Association fired workers who refused to handle ‘tainted’ goods, i.e., materials provided by or for employers who supported Murphy’s lockout.
  12. 12. 15 September. Another conference took place between employers, workers, and English trade unionists, but ended in failure. 16 September. Serious rioting broke out in Finglas village, and the police opened fire to disperse rioters. 21 September. Strikers marched through the city centre and clashed with police. 22 September. Staff employed by Timber Merchants refused to work with ‘tainted’ goods, and joined the strike.
  13. 13. 25 September. Troops were drafted in to protect property. 26 September. The Government Board of Trade appointed George Askwith, Thomas R. Rathliffe–Ellis, and J. R. Clynes MP to oversee a Court of Inquiry to investigate the causes of the dispute, and to try to end it. 27 September. The first food ship arrives from England with 60,000 ‘family boxes’ for striking workers.
  14. 14. 29 September. The Askwith Commission of Inquiry into the causes of the Lockout began. 2 & 3 October. Employers gave evidence to the Commission, defended their actions against the ITGWU, emphasised that they were not against Unions in principle, but were resolutely opposed to the ITGWU because it threatened their very existence by forcing workers into sympathetic strikes. 4 October. Representatives of the workers presented their case to the Commission, and stated that they would return to work only if Employers lifted their ban on the ITGWU, and reinstated all workers.
  15. 15. 6 October. The Court of Inquiry concluded. Askwith recommended that a Conciliation Committee be set up, to hear the case of workers and employers, and to attempt to resolve disputes before a strike or lockout was declared. Employers rejected Askwith’s proposals. 8 October. Serious riots occurred in Swords, Co. Dublin when striking workers tried to prevent farmers bringing cattle to market. Police and civilians were injured. 14 October. In response to the Commissioners’ Report, the Employers’ Federation announced that they would end the Lockout only if the ITGWU were completely reorganised, under new leadership, and that they would not promise to reinstate every worker because they would not fire workers who replaced those on strike.
  16. 16. 16 October. A crowd of about 4000 striking workers marched through the city to protest at the employers’ statement. 20 October. Archbishop William Walsh condemned the plan to send children of strikers to England for the duration of the strike. 21 October. The first group of children set sail for England, amidst loud protests from angry crowds at the ports. 12 November. Labourers in Dublin port stopped work. 18 December. Representatives of workers and employers met again to try to reach agreement but discussions ended two days later because of disagreement about the reinstatement of workers who had been on strike. December 1913 & January 1914. Striking workers gradually began to return to work and the Lockout ended by degrees.
  17. 17. 2. Irish Citizen Army

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