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FDR’s Policies and Major Military Actions America Enters World War II
Before America Entered the War… <ul><li>FDR initiated a build-up of defenses and the military in 1939 and 1940, Congress a...
A German U-boat
War on the Home Front <ul><li>After Pearl Harbor, many young men enlisted in the military, while some others were drafted ...
Women’s Army Corps Poster
The Government and the Economy <ul><li>National War Labor Board: limited wage increased, allowed benefits, kept unions sta...
Major Military Movements <ul><li>The fight for the Atlantic: FDR minimized the loss of Allied ships to U-boats by organizi...
A Torpedoed Japanese Destroyer
Major Military Movements (Cont’d) <ul><li>The Battle of Midway:  American forces won a very important victory, defeating a...
American Troops Taking Guam
People to Know <ul><li>FDR: U.S. President during the war </li></ul><ul><li>Winston Churchill: British Prime Minister, too...
 
The Closing of the War <ul><li>In April 1945, the Soviets stormed Berlin and the Allies were able to make their last push ...
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  1. 1. FDR’s Policies and Major Military Actions America Enters World War II
  2. 2. Before America Entered the War… <ul><li>FDR initiated a build-up of defenses and the military in 1939 and 1940, Congress also passed the first draft during peace time </li></ul><ul><li>In late 1940, FDR started up the Lend-Lease Plan which let other countries fighting against the Axis Powers “borrow” military supplies and arms. </li></ul><ul><li>In response to this, Hitler sent out “wolf packs” of German U-Boats (submarines, the “u” is for “unter” or under) </li></ul><ul><li>FDR signed the Atlantic Charter with Churchill, laying out the principles for why WWII was being fought: for civil rights, free trade, international cooperation and disarmament </li></ul>
  3. 3. A German U-boat
  4. 4. War on the Home Front <ul><li>After Pearl Harbor, many young men enlisted in the military, while some others were drafted by the Selective Service </li></ul><ul><li>Women were encouraged to join the WAAC, the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, although they were not paid or treated as well as their male counterparts </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial factories were switched to war production factories </li></ul><ul><li>6 million women entered the workforce and took over jobs that men had before the war (but only earned 60 to a man’s dollar) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Women’s Army Corps Poster
  6. 6. The Government and the Economy <ul><li>National War Labor Board: limited wage increased, allowed benefits, kept unions stable </li></ul><ul><li>War production Board: Rationed fuel, rubber, plastics and oil </li></ul><ul><li>Dept of the Treasury: issued war bonds </li></ul><ul><li>Smith-Connally Act: limited the right for workers to strike in industries crucial to the war effort </li></ul>
  7. 7. Major Military Movements <ul><li>The fight for the Atlantic: FDR minimized the loss of Allied ships to U-boats by organizing them into convoys escorted by destroyers </li></ul><ul><li>The Battle of Stalingrad: Hitler’s army took over the Soviet city of Stalingrad in 1943, and after months of occupation, the Soviets pushed back and won am impressive victory but lost over a million people </li></ul><ul><li>The North African Front: Allied troops under Eisenhower defeated German forces in North Africa in 1942 </li></ul>
  8. 8. A Torpedoed Japanese Destroyer
  9. 9. Major Military Movements (Cont’d) <ul><li>The Battle of Midway: American forces won a very important victory, defeating a Japanese attack in 1942, often known as the most important battle on the Pacific front </li></ul><ul><li>Germany continues to use “blitzkrieg” war against Britain, and Britain is continually bombed throughout the early years of the war </li></ul><ul><li>The Battle of the Bulge: A huge German offensive was defeated by Allied forces in the Ardennes (a section of hilly forests in Belgium/Luxembourg), German forces were significantly depleted- the bloodies U.S. engagement of the war </li></ul>
  10. 10. American Troops Taking Guam
  11. 11. People to Know <ul><li>FDR: U.S. President during the war </li></ul><ul><li>Winston Churchill: British Prime Minister, took over for Chamberlain </li></ul><ul><li>Hirohito: Japanese Emperor </li></ul><ul><li>Hideki Tojo: Japanese War General </li></ul><ul><li>Dwight D. Eisenhower: U.S. War General in North Africa </li></ul><ul><li>George Patton: U.S. War General at D-Day </li></ul><ul><li>Stalin: Soviet Premier </li></ul><ul><li>Hitler: German Fuhrer </li></ul><ul><li>George Marshall: U.S. Army Chief of Staff </li></ul>
  12. 13. The Closing of the War <ul><li>In April 1945, the Soviets stormed Berlin and the Allies were able to make their last push through Germany </li></ul><ul><li>Hitler committed suicide in his underground bunker and Eisenhower accepted a formal surrender from the Germans </li></ul><ul><li>The nation celebrated V-E Day (Victory in Europe Day) </li></ul><ul><li>The Allied forces captured Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. drops Atomic bombs on the Japanese cities Nagasaki and Hiroshima </li></ul>

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