Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Electrical Safety by Industrial Safety Institute

4,081 views

Published on

Electrical Safety

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

Electrical Safety by Industrial Safety Institute

  1. 1. NFPA 70E® –2015 Electrical Safety Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® 2015 Edition 1 Presented by: R Scott Young Industrial Safety Institute
  2. 2. Topics covered today • Safety related work practices • Arc flash analysis and the Tables • Shock protection boundaries • Arc Flash Boundaries • Hazard risk categories  • Appendix • Energized work permit 2
  3. 3. • Recognizing the hazards: – Exposure – Electrical hazard – Arc Flash hazard 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 7
  6. 6. • A Safe Work Area requires focus on the three most common factors for electrical accidents. According to OSHA these include: – Equipment – Environment – Employee Work Practices 8
  7. 7. • It is the Employer’s Responsibility to Provide: – Safe work – Equipment – Safe work – Environment – Safe work Practices • Documentation • Training 9
  8. 8. • It is the Employee’s responsibility to: – Use the Equipment Provided – Pay attention to the Environment – Use the Safe Work Practices (procedures) Provided by the Employer 10
  9. 9. Safe Electrical Work Practices Shall be Used • Avoid – Shortcuts – Cord and Plug – Failure to de-energize – Unsafe tools – Horseplay 11
  10. 10. 90.2 Scope  Covered. The standard addresses electrical safety related work practices safety-related maintenance requirements, and other administrative controls • Covered (examples) • Public and Private Premises (commercial & industrial) • Installations • Electric utilities for ALL facilities other than communications, metering, generation, control, transformation, transmission, or distribution Informational Note 12
  11. 11. 90.3 Arrangement  Chapter 2 applies to safety-related maintenance requirements for electrical equipment and installations in workplaces  Informative Annex F, Risk Assessment Procedure 13
  12. 12. Chapter 1 Safety-Related Work Practices Article 100 Definitions 14
  13. 13. Definitions New definitions • Hazard • Hazardous • Risk • Risk assessment 15
  14. 14. Definitions • Boundary, Arc Flash • Calculated for 2nd degree burn–1.2 cal/cm2  Boundary, Limited Approach. An approach limit at a distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part within which a shock hazard exists. 16
  15. 15. Definitions  Boundary, Restricted Approach. An approach limit at a distance from an exposed energized electrical conductor or circuit part within which there is likelihood of electric shock, due to electrical arc-over combined with inadvertent movement, for personnel working in close proximity to the energized electrical conductor or circuit part.  Note: Prohibited Approach has been removed 17
  16. 16. Chapter 1 Safety-Related Work Practices Article 110 General Requirements for Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices 18
  17. 17. 110.1 Electrical Safety Program.  General. Employer shall  document an overall electrical safety program appropriate to the risk associated with electrical hazards.  implemented as part of the electrical safety and health program  Maintenance. The electrical safety program shall include elements that consider condition of maintenance of electrical equipment and systems. 19
  18. 18. 110.1 Electrical Safety Program.  Awareness and Self-Discipline. The electrical safety program shall  provide an awareness of the potential electrical hazards  provide the required self discipline for all employees  Instill safety principles and controls 20
  19. 19. 110.1 Electrical Safety Program.  Electrical Safety Program Procedures. An electrical safety program shall identify the procedures to be utilized before work is started by employees exposed to an electrical hazard 21
  20. 20. 110.1 Electrical Safety Program.  Risk Assessment Procedure. An electrical safety program shall include a  risk assessment procedure that addresses employee exposure to electrical hazards.  shall identify the process to be used by the employee before work is started to carry out the following:  Identify hazards, Assess risks, Implement risk control according to a hierarchy of methods 22
  21. 21. 110.1 Electrical Safety Program.  Job Briefing. Before starting each job  Briefing shall cover  hazards associated with the job  work procedures involved  special precautions  energy source controls  PPE requirements  the information on the energized electrical work permit, if required  Additional job briefings shall be held if changes occur during the course of the work. 23
  22. 22. 110.2 Training Requirements  Type of Training  On the Job / Classroom or both  Emergency Response training  Contact Release  First Aid, Emergency response and Resuscitation  Trained in First Aid, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation(CPR), Automatic External Defibrillator (AED)  Annual employer certification and documentation of training required 24
  23. 23. 110.2 Training Requirements  Employee Training.  Qualified Person (cont.)  Skills to:  Make decisions for job planning and personal protective equipment (PPE)  Perform the job safety planning, Identify electrical hazards, Assess the associated rise  Select the appropriate risk control methods from the hierarchy of controls identified in 110.1(G), including personal protective equipment 25
  24. 24. 110.2 Training Requirements  Unqualified Person trained for their safety  Retraining  Retraining in safety-related work practices and applicable changes in this standard shall be performed at intervals not to exceed three years. 26
  25. 25. Chapter 1 Safety-Related Work Practices Article 120 Establishing an Electrically Safe Work Condition 27
  26. 26. 120.2 – Application of Lockout/Tagout Principles of Lockout/Tagout Execution Retraining Retraining shall be performed: When procedures are revised At intervals not to exceed 3 years Training Documentation. Employer shall document employee training shall be made when employee demonstrates proficiency shall contain the content of the training, employee’s name, dates of training 28
  27. 27. Chapter 1 Safety-Related Work Practices Article 130 Work Involving Electrical Hazards 29
  28. 28. 130.2 Electrically Safe Working Conditions Energized Work Normal Operations Shall be permitted where all of the following conditions are satisfied the equipment  is properly installed  is properly maintained  doors are closed and secured  All equipment covers are in place and secured  no evidence of impending failure 30
  29. 29. 130.2 Electrically Safe Working Conditions Energized Electrical Work Permit  Energized electrical work permit shall be required in accordance with 130.2(A), under the following conditions:  Work performed within the restricted approach boundary  Employee working near equipment not exposed but an increased likelihood of injury from arc flash hazard exists 31
  30. 30. 130.3 Working While Exposed to Electrical Hazards General Safety-related work practices shall – be used to safeguard employees electrical conductors and circuit parts – be determined before exposure to shock or arc flash hazard (using risk assessment) – ONLY qualified persons permitted to work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts – put in electrically safe work condition 32
  31. 31. 130.4 Approach Boundaries to Electrical Circuit parts or Conductors for Shock Protection Shock Risk Assessment. A shock risk assessment shall be used to determine the voltage to which personnel will be exposed Boundary requirements Necessary PPE 33
  32. 32. 130.4 Approach Boundaries to Electrical Circuit parts or Conductors for Shock Protection Shock Protection Boundaries Limited Approach Boundary  Unless permitted by 130.4(C)(3) Restricted Approach Boundary Tables 130.4(D)(a) & (b) 34
  33. 33. 130.5 Arc Flash Risk Assessment Documentation  Documentation required on all arc flash risk assessment. 35
  34. 34. 130.5 Arc Flash Risk Assessment Arc Flash PPE – One of the following methods shall be used, either but not both: • Incident Energy Analysis Method • Engineering calculations (Annex D) • Arc Flash PPE Category Method – Table 130.7(C)(15) – Table 130.7(C)(16) 36
  35. 35. 130.7 Personal and Other Protective Equipment Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Selection of Personal Protective Equipment When Required for Various Tasks  Incident energy analysis required by 130.5(C)(1)  (AC equipment) When selected in lieu of the incident energy analysis of 130.5(C)(1), Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a) shall be used When arc flash PPE is required, Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(b) shall be used to determine the arc flash PPE category  See Informational Notes.  (DC equipment) 37
  36. 36. An incident energy analysis shall be required in accordance with 130.5 for the following: •Tasks not listed in Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a) •Power systems with greater than the estimated maximum available short-circuit current •Power systems with longer than the maximum fault clearing times •Tasks with less than the minimum working distance 130.7 Personal and Other Protective Equipment Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 38
  37. 37. 39
  38. 38. 40
  39. 39. 130.7 Personal and Other Protective Equipment Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Arc flash PPE category identified from Table 130.7(C)(15)(A) (b) or Table 130.7(C)(15)(B), Table 130.7(C)(16) used to determine the required PPE for the task. Table 130.7(C)(16) lists PPE based on arc flash PPE categories 1 through 4. 41
  40. 40. 42
  41. 41. 130.7 Personal and Other Protective Equipment Alerting Techniques 1) Safety Signs and Tags  Per ANSI Z535 1) Barricades –if arc flash boundary > limited approach, shall not be put closer than Arc flash boundary 2) Attendants 3) Look-Alike Equipment Standards for Other Protective Equipment – See Table 130.7(F) 43
  42. 42. Personal Protective Equipment Category specific Arc-Rated Clothing  ARC 1 – minimum 4 cal/cm2  ARC 2 – minimum 8 cal/cm2  ARC 3 – minimum 25 cal/cm2  ARC 4 – minimum 40 cal/cm2 44
  43. 43. Chapter 3 Safety Requirements for Special Equipment 45
  44. 44. Batteries and Battery Rooms • Scope – Practical safeguarding of employees – Batteries that exceed 50 volts, nominal • Definitions specific to article • Safety procedures – General safety hazards – Battery risk Assessment – Electrolyte Hazards – Cell Flame Arresters & Cell Ventilation 46
  45. 45. Informative Annexes A – P 47
  46. 46. R. Scott Young Industrial Safety Institute WWW.IndustrialSafetyInstitute.com Ph 813.732.6445 Email: Rsyisi@gmail.com Questions?

×