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Visual Arts
Drama
Music
Dance
Technology
Reggio Emilia
Literacy
Books
Websites
Action Plan
Referenc...
Visual Arts
Visual Arts Standards
Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques,
and processes.
•Students know the differen...
Visual Arts Standards Cont.
Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter,
symbols and ideas.
•Students ex...
Visual Arts Standards Cont.
Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the
characteristics and merits of their [a student's...
Visual Arts Activities
Shadow Art

Name tags
I sh

Elem

r
of A
s
ent

r
oste
tP

Finger Dancing
Bo

culpt
dy S

hunt
re
Textu

Matis
se

Wirin
g
Drama
Drama Standards
Content Standard #1: Script writing by planning and recording improvisations based on
personal experience ...
Drama Standards Cont.
Content Standard #3: Designing by visualizing and arranging environments for
classroom dramatization...
Drama Standards Cont.
Content Standard #5: Researching by finding information to support
classroom dramatizations.
Achieve...
Drama Standards Cont.

Content Standard #7: Analyzing and explaining personal preferences and constructing meanings
from c...
Yes Lets!

Human Play Dough

Train Wreck

Drama Activities
Story
Drama

Character Museum

Story Production
Story Box Theater

Bear Hunt Strategy
Tableau

Magic Box

Shadow Play

Fairy Tale Talk Show
Circle Drama Video
Music
Music Standards

NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR MUSIC EDUCATION

Standard 1: Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire
o...
Music Activities
Story Music Effects

Body Part Steady Beat

Scales
Line Composition

Music StylesFunga Alafia

Sound Scape
Musically
Inspired
Characters

Song Writing

Symbol Rhythm

Story Drama
With Sounds
Dance/Movement
Dance Standards

National Dance Standard K-4

Standard 1: Identifying and demonstrating movement elements and skills in
pe...
Dance Activities

Shadow Dance
Stretchy Bands
Dragon Dance
Autumn Leaves
Are Falling

Round of
Applause

Machine Dancing
Funky Chicken

Human Paint
Brush

Texture
Dance
Four
Corners
Human Machine
Letter Locomotion
Water Dance
Body Letters
Technology
Technology Standards
Technology Standards Cont.
My Digital Story (Click to Play)
Digital Story Telling
Reggio Emilia
Respect the children

Reggio Emilia
Communication, Collaboration,
They are capable Community
Literacy
Connect the Arts to Literacy
Books
1. It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles Shaw
2. The Napping House by Audrey Wood
3.Pete the Cat: Rocking in My Schoo...
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www.arts4learning.org
www.aahperd.org/nda
www.songsforteaching.com
www.classicsforkids.com
www.onemorestory.com...
My proposed intervention:
•Collaborate with parent to use the arts in
the home and school setting to promote
communication...
References
Theater
American Alliance for Theatre Education (n.d.). National theatre standards:K-4.
Retrieved from
http://w...
References Continued
Dance
Agoo ammee (n.d.).
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance
(n.d...
References Continued
Music
Benefits of music study (n.d.).
Crocker, D. (n.d.). Me stone.
Music Educators National Conferen...
References Continued
Visual Arts:
American Alliance for Theatre Education (n.d.). Grades K-4 visual art standards.
Retriev...
References Continued
Literacy
Andreae, G., & Parker-Rees, G. ( 1999). Giraffes can’t dance. New York, NY: Orchard
Books.
B...
References Continued
Websites
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (2013). National
dan...
References Continued
Articles
Causton-Theoharis, J. N. (2009). The golden rule of providing support in
inclusive classroom...
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Eced 680 e portfolio final ppt

  1. 1.            Visual Arts Drama Music Dance Technology Reggio Emilia Literacy Books Websites Action Plan References
  2. 2. Visual Arts
  3. 3. Visual Arts Standards Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes. •Students know the difference between materials, techniques and processes. •Students describe how different materials, techniques and processes cause different responses. •Students use different media, techniques and processes to communicate ideas, experiences and stories. •Students use art materials and tools in safe and responsible manner. Standard 2: Using knowledge of structures and functions. •Students know the differences among visual characteristics and purposes of art in order to convey ideas. •Students describe how different expressive features and organizational principles cause different responses. •Students use visual structures and functions. of art to communicate ideas.
  4. 4. Visual Arts Standards Cont. Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas. •Students explore and understand prospective content for works of art. •Students select and use subject matter, symbols and ideas to communicate meaning. Standard 4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures. •Students know that the visual arts have both a history and specific relationships to various cultures . •Students identify specific works of art as belonging to particular cultures, times and places. •Students demonstrate how history, culture and the visual arts can influence each other in making and studying works of art..
  5. 5. Visual Arts Standards Cont. Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their [a student's own] work and the work of others. •Students understand that there are various purposes for creating works of visual art. •Students describe how people's experiences influence the development of specific artworks. •Students understand there are different responses to specific artworks. Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines. •Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines. •Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum.
  6. 6. Visual Arts Activities Shadow Art Name tags
  7. 7. I sh Elem r of A s ent r oste tP Finger Dancing
  8. 8. Bo culpt dy S hunt re Textu Matis se Wirin g
  9. 9. Drama
  10. 10. Drama Standards Content Standard #1: Script writing by planning and recording improvisations based on personal experience and heritage, imagination, literature, and history. Achievement Standard: a) Students collaborate to select interrelated characters, environments, and situations for classroom dramatizations. b) Students improvise dialogue to tell stories, and formalize improvisations by writing or recording the dialogue. Content Standard #2: Acting by assuming roles and interacting in improvisations. Achievement Standard: a) Students imagine and clearly describe characters, their relationships, and their environments. b) Students use variations of locomotor and nonlocomotor movement and vocal pitch, tempo, and tone for different characters. c) Students assume roles that exhibit concentration and contribute to the action of classroom dramatizations based on personal experience and heritage, imagination, literature, and history.
  11. 11. Drama Standards Cont. Content Standard #3: Designing by visualizing and arranging environments for classroom dramatizations. Achievement Standard: a) Students visualize environments and construct designs to communicate locale and mood using visual elements (such as space, color, line, shape, texture) and aural aspects using a variety of sound sources. b) Students collaborate to establish playing spaces for classroom dramatizations and to select and safely organize available materials that suggest scenery, properties, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Content Standard #4: Directing by planning classroom dramatizations. Achievement Standard: a) Students collaboratively plan and prepare improvisations and demonstrate various ways of staging classroom dramatizations.
  12. 12. Drama Standards Cont. Content Standard #5: Researching by finding information to support classroom dramatizations. Achievement Standard: a) Students communicate information to peers about people, events, time, and place related to classroom dramatizations. Content Standard #6: Comparing and connecting art forms by describing theatre, dramatic media (such as film, television, and electronic media), and other art forms. Achievement Standard: a) Students describe visual, aural, oral, and kinetic elements in theatre, dramatic media, dance, music, and visual arts. b) Students compare how ideas and emotions are expressed in theatre, dramatic media, dance, music, and visual arts. c) Students select movement, music, or visual elements to enhance the mood of a classroom dramatization.
  13. 13. Drama Standards Cont. Content Standard #7: Analyzing and explaining personal preferences and constructing meanings from classroom dramatizations and from theatre, film, television, and electronic media productions. Achievement Standard: a) Students identify and describe the visual, aural, oral, and kinetic elements of classroom dramatizations and dramatic performances. b) Students explain how the wants and needs of characters are similar to and different from their own. c) Students articulate emotional responses to and explain personal preferences about the whole as well as the parts of dramatic performances. d) Students analyze classroom dramatizations and, using appropriate terminology, constructively suggest alternative ideas for dramatizing roles, arranging environments, and developing situations along with means of improving the collaborative processes of planning, playing, responding, and evaluating. Content Standard #8: Understanding context by recognizing the role of theatre, film, television, and electronic media in daily life. Achievement Standard: a) Students identify and compare similar characters and situations in stories and dramas from and about various cultures, illustrate with classroom dramatizations, and discuss how theatre reflects life. b) Students identify and compare the various settings and reasons for creating dramas and attending theatre, film, television, and electronic media production.
  14. 14. Yes Lets! Human Play Dough Train Wreck Drama Activities
  15. 15. Story Drama Character Museum Story Production
  16. 16. Story Box Theater Bear Hunt Strategy
  17. 17. Tableau Magic Box Shadow Play Fairy Tale Talk Show
  18. 18. Circle Drama Video
  19. 19. Music
  20. 20. Music Standards NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR MUSIC EDUCATION Standard 1: Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. Standard 2:Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music. Standard 3: Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments. Standard 4:Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines. Standard 5: Reading and notating music. Standard 6: Listening to, analyzing, and describing music. Standard 7: Evaluating music and music performances. Standard 8: Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts. Standard 9: Understanding music in relation to history and culture.
  21. 21. Music Activities Story Music Effects Body Part Steady Beat Scales
  22. 22. Line Composition Music StylesFunga Alafia Sound Scape
  23. 23. Musically Inspired Characters Song Writing Symbol Rhythm Story Drama With Sounds
  24. 24. Dance/Movement
  25. 25. Dance Standards National Dance Standard K-4 Standard 1: Identifying and demonstrating movement elements and skills in performing dance. Standard 2: Understanding choreographic principals, processes, and structures. Standard 3: Understanding dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.   Standard 4: Applying and demonstrating critical and creative thinking skills in dance.   Standard 5: Demonstrating and understanding dance in various cultures and historical periods.   Standard 6: Making connections between dance and healthful living.   Standard 7: Making connections between dance and other disciplines.
  26. 26. Dance Activities Shadow Dance Stretchy Bands Dragon Dance
  27. 27. Autumn Leaves Are Falling Round of Applause Machine Dancing
  28. 28. Funky Chicken Human Paint Brush Texture Dance Four Corners
  29. 29. Human Machine Letter Locomotion Water Dance Body Letters
  30. 30. Technology
  31. 31. Technology Standards
  32. 32. Technology Standards Cont.
  33. 33. My Digital Story (Click to Play) Digital Story Telling
  34. 34. Reggio Emilia Respect the children Reggio Emilia Communication, Collaboration, They are capable Community
  35. 35. Literacy
  36. 36. Connect the Arts to Literacy
  37. 37. Books 1. It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles Shaw 2. The Napping House by Audrey Wood 3.Pete the Cat: Rocking in My School Shoes by James Dean 4. We’re Going on a Lion Hunt by Margery Cuyler 5. The Black Rabbit by Philippa Leathers 6. I Ain’t Going to Paint No More by Karen Beaumont 7. How Will I Get to School This Year? By Jerry Pallotta 8. The Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen 9. Ish by Peter Reynolds 10. Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae 11. The Little Yellow Leaf by Carin Berger 12. Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina 13. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak 14. Perfect Square by Michael Hall 15. Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young
  38. 38.      www.arts4learning.org www.aahperd.org/nda www.songsforteaching.com www.classicsforkids.com www.onemorestory.com      www.nyphilkids.org www.dsokids.com www.sfskids.org www.teachertube.com http://multikidsmusicvids.co
  39. 39. My proposed intervention: •Collaborate with parent to use the arts in the home and school setting to promote communication skills in children with speech and language delays. How I will implement the plan: •Home visits to use the arts in the home with the parent and child •Parent workshops on the different art areas •Family art days •Invite parents to observe the arts in the classroom
  40. 40. References Theater American Alliance for Theatre Education (n.d.). National theatre standards:K-4. Retrieved from http://www.aate.com/?page=nationalstandards14 Carroll, A., (2009). Classroom drama for all children: Suggested approaches for story drama. Carroll, A. (2010). Responding to Theatre. Classroom drama for inclusive learning (2004). Creative dance resources (n.d.). Fennessey, S. (2006). Using theater games to enhance language arts learning. The Reading Teacher,59(7), 688-690. Lyons, K. Using theatre to understand parts of a story, summarizing, retelling, and problem-solving. Menu of arts ed strategies (n.d.). Meyers, N. Story Chant. Wilson. P. W. (2003). Supporting young children’s thinking through tableau. Language Arts, 80 (1), 375-383.
  41. 41. References Continued Dance Agoo ammee (n.d.). American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.aahperd.org/dance/prodev/standards-grades-k-4.c Child and Family (2006). Creative dance in early childhood education. Dragon dance (n.d.). Gilbert, A. G. (2003). Toward best practices in dance education through the theory of multiple intelligences. Brain-Compatible Dance Education, 267272. Gilbert, A. G. (2005). Strategies for creating dances. Brain-Compatible Dance Education, 186. Shake and stop (n.d.). Virginia reel (n.d.). Wilcox, C. (n.d). The elements of dance for children.
  42. 42. References Continued Music Benefits of music study (n.d.). Crocker, D. (n.d.). Me stone. Music Educators National Conference (1994). The national standards for music education. National Standards for Arts Education. Elements of music (n.d.). Evans, K. (n.d.). Se, se, se. Jay, C. (n.d.). Funga Alafia Jenkins, E. & Williams, I. (n.d.). Jambo hello. Kye kye kule (n.d.). “La raspa”-Mexico (n.d.). McRae, S. & Spallina, A.M. (n.d.). Hello song. Moore, L. (n.d.). Oboo asi me nsa. Sinclair, M. & Williams, I. (n.d.). Kookaburra. Spallina, A.M. (n.d.) Counting song. Spallina, A.M. (n.d.). This is what I can do. Williams, I. (n.d.). Clap you hands.
  43. 43. References Continued Visual Arts: American Alliance for Theatre Education (n.d.). Grades K-4 visual art standards. Retrieved from http://artsedge.kennedycenter.org/educators/standards/national/arts-standards/k-4/visual-arts/visual-arts1.aspx Colker, L. J. (n.d.). A place for weaving. Teaching Young Children, 5(3), 16-17. One looks says it all (n.d.). Elements of art (n.d.). Reggio Emilia Malaguzzi, L. (n.d). 100 ways of children. Pinnacle Presbyterian Church (2006, April 13). Reggio Emilia Philosophy. Retrieved from: http://www.pinnaclepres.org/reggio-emilia-philosophy/ Technology Daniels, J. (2012). Creating digital stories using windows live movie maker. Daniels, J. (n.d.). How to add a link. Maryland’s Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology. Maryland teacher technology standards. Retrieved from http://www.mttsonline.org/standards/
  44. 44. References Continued Literacy Andreae, G., & Parker-Rees, G. ( 1999). Giraffes can’t dance. New York, NY: Orchard Books. Beaumont, K. (2005). I ain’t going to paint no more! Orlando, FL: Harcourt. Berger, C. (2008). The little yellow leaf. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books. Cuyler, M. (2008). We’re going on a lion hunt. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish Corporation. Dean, J. & Litwin, E. (2011). Pete the cat: Rocking in my school shoes. New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers. Diesen, D. (2008). The pout pout fish. New York, NY: Macmillan Young Listeners. Hall, M. (2011). Perfect square. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books. Leathers, P. (2013). The black rabbit. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press. Pallotta, J. (2013). How will I get to school this year? New York, NY: Scholastic. Reynolds, P. (2004). Ish. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press. Sendak. M. (1963). Where the wild things are. New York, NY: Harper & Row. Shaw, C. (1947). It looked like spilt milk. New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers. Slobodkina, E. (1947). Caps for sale. New York, NY: Harper & Row. Wood, A. (2009). The napping house. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Children’s Books. Young, E. (2007). Seven blind mice. Norwalk, CT: Weston Woods Studios. Books for celebrating the arts with young children (2012). Music and literacy ideas (2012).
  45. 45. References Continued Websites American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (2013). National dance association. Retrieved from http://www.aahperd.org/nda/ Cincinnati Public Radio Inc (2013). Classics for kids. Retrieved from http://www.classicsforkids.com/ Dallas Symphony Association (2013). DSO kids. Retrieved from http://www.dsokids.com/ Multi Kids Music Vids (2013). Multicultural kids music vids with Daria. Retrieved from http://multikidsmusicvids.com/ One More Story Inc. (n.d.). One more story: Authors you know, books you love. Retrieved from http://onemorestory.com/index.html San Francisco Symphony (n.d.). SFS kids: Fun with music. Retrieved from http://www.sfskids.org/templates/home.asp?pageid=1 Songs for Teaching (2012). Songs for teaching: Using music to promote learning. Retrieved from http://songsforteaching.com/index.html Symphony Works/Moon Road LLC (n.d.). The New York Philharmonic kid zone! Retrieved from http://www.nyphilkids.org/main.phtml Teacher Tube, LLC (n.d.). Teacher tube: Teach the world. Retrieved from http://www.teachertube.com/ Youth Audience (2010). Arts for learning. Retrieved from http://arts4learning.org/
  46. 46. References Continued Articles Causton-Theoharis, J. N. (2009). The golden rule of providing support in inclusive classrooms: Support others as you would wish to be supported. Teaching Exceptional Children, 36-43. Elements of a comprehensive assessment system in early childhood (n.d). Goldhaber, J. & Smith, D. (1997). “You look at think differently:” The role of documentation in the professional development of a campus childcare center staff. Early Childhood Education Journal, 25(1), 3-10. Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education (2008). Supporting students in general education classes. Sharapan, H. ( 2012). From STEM to STEAM: How early childhood educators can apply Fred Rogers’ approach. Young Children, 67(1), 36-40. Why Yoga? Why Now? (n.d). Textbook Isenberg, J.P. & Jalongo. M. R. (2013). Creative thinking and arts-based learning (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

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