Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Struggle Over Representation in the Studio: Critical Pedagogy in Design Education

402 views

Published on

Critical pedagogy has historically been used to document and explicate unequal power relationships in education environments, but this perspective has not been fully developed in the context of design education. The purpose of this study is to begin the process of synthesizing perspectives on critical pedagogy and what we know about representation and materiality in the studio space in order to see the tensions that arise as new methods of representation are explored and implemented in a relatively new studio space within an emergent design discipline. By documenting the tensions surrounding representation in the studio through a critical ethnography, issues of pedagogical oppression, student experience, and representations of design in this particular design field can be more rigorously explored, establishing a space for critical pedagogy in design education, and exploring forms of oppression that may be unique to creative disciplines.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Struggle Over Representation in the Studio: Critical Pedagogy in Design Education

  1. 1. C O L I N M . G R A Y I O WA S TA T E U N I V E R S I T Y S T R U G G L E O V E R R E P R E S E N TAT I O N C R I T I C A L P E D A G O G Y I N D E S I G N E D U C A T I O N I N T H E S T U D I O
  2. 2. I N T R O D U C T I O N • Studio pedagogy is built on the apprenticeship or atelier model of education (Cuff, 1991) • Elements of the studio pedagogy are being incorporated into disciplines without an established history as a design discipline 
 (Brandt et al., 2011; Fallman, 2003; Winograd, 1990) • It is vital to understand the patterns of hegemony built into the pedagogy (Anthony, 1991; Blythman, Orr, & Blair, 2007) before it becomes institutionalized and unquestioned, as in most art and design disciplines (Gray, 2014; Shaffer, 2003)
  3. 3. C R I T I C A L P E D A G O G Y • Broadly applied within educational research, focusing on issues of institutionalized (and social) oppression (e.g., Darder, Baltodano, & Torres, 2003; Freire, 1970; Giroux, 2011) • Freire’s (1970) description of traditional education as operating on the “banking” model, calling for a shift to “problem-posing” which affirms all individuals in the process of becoming • Accounts for power relations and norms communicated through the hidden curriculum (Freire, 1970)
  4. 4. C R I T I C A L [ D E S I G N ] P E D A G O G Y ? • The studio model extends back into 18th century Europe (Cuff, 1991), and significant evidence of patriarchy and institutionalized oppression has been documented in this model of education (e.g., Anthony, 1991; Koch, 2002; Willenbrock, 1991) • Common themes include socialization into design (Webster, 2008), harshness of critique (Anthony, 1991; Webster, 2006), and the often oppressive hidden curriculum of the studio (Dutton, 1991) Critical framings of pedagogy have been rare in art 
 and design education, & have not been documented 
 in emergent design disciplines
  5. 5. C L A S S R O O M S T U D I O
  6. 6. V YA S & N I J H O LT, 2 0 1 2 , P. 1 7 6 “Studio surfaces are not just the carriers of information but importantly they are sites of methodic design practices, i.e. they indicate, to an extent, how design is being carried out.”
  7. 7. R E P R E S E N TAT I O N OF IDENTITY OF PROCESS
  8. 8. R E P R E S E N TAT I O N OF IDENTITY OF PROCESS How am I able to represent my design work in a public way How am I able to perform my identity as a 
 proto-professional
  9. 9. T W O D I S C O U R S E S O F D E S I G N A C A S E
  10. 10. D ATA S O U R C E S PRIMARY • Participant Observation • Photos, Audio, Video • Critical Interview SECONDARY • Artifact Analysis
  11. 11. P R O T O - P R O F E S S I O N A L D I S C O U R S E • Transience of physical design processes
  12. 12. P R O T O - P R O F E S S I O N A L D I S C O U R S E • Transience of physical design processes • Tensions over marking the space v. “showing off”
  13. 13. P R O T O - P R O F E S S I O N A L D I S C O U R S E • Transience of physical design processes • Tensions over marking the space v. “showing off” • Rhythms of representation that paralleled class projects
  14. 14. • Prioritization of completed artifacts over process • Reification of capstone poster as the students’ “best work” FA C U LT Y / A C A D E M I C D I S C O U R S E
  15. 15. FA C U LT Y / A C A D E M I C D I S C O U R S E • Prioritization of completed artifacts over process • Reification of capstone poster as the students’ “best work” • Tension between physical prototyping and keeping a “clean” space
  16. 16. L E G I T I M AT I N G A R E P R E S E N TAT I O N S T U D I O T R A N S F O R M A T I O N
  17. 17. M A R G I N A L I Z I N G A R E P R E S E N TAT I O N S T U D I O T R A N S F O R M A T I O N
  18. 18. P R O C E S S V. F I N A L P R O D U C T
  19. 19. W H AT D O E S T H I S C A S E T E L L U S A B O U T T H E 
 S T R U G G L E F O R R E P R E S E N TAT I O N ?
  20. 20. D I S C U S S I O N S T U D E N T S T R I E D T O L E AV E T H E I R M A R K , E V E N 
 W H E N T H E O D D S W E R E N O T I N T H E I R FAV O R S T U D E N T S O R I E N T E D T O WA R D S P R A C T I C E , W H I L E A C A D E M I A T E N D E D T O G H E T T O I Z E T H E I R W O R K
  21. 21. Hegemony of media and format quite clearly communicates to students what a faculty 
 member or program at large values 
 (e.g., Dineen & Collins, 2005)
 The value of specific forms of 
 representation were not shared, but 
 rather a point of contention
  22. 22. C O L I N G R AY. M E T H A N K Y O U

×