Where scrum doesn't fit

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Presentation to ISA agile event 'Bringing Agile to the Next Level' Oct2nd 2013 in Dublin

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Where scrum doesn't fit

  1. 1.   Colm  O’hEocha  –  AgileInnova4on   Slow  Down  to  Speed  Up   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on   1   Where  Scrum  won’t  fit:     Ge2ng  Agile  with  Kanban  in  IT  Ops  and   Support  
  2. 2. This  material  is  Copyright   Protected  under  the  following   Crea4ve  Commons  License:     AGribu4on-­‐ShareAlike  3.0     Please  use  this  material  freely   and  derive  further  work  from  it.   BUT,  aGribu4on  must  be  given   to  the  original  author,  and   these  same  rights  must  govern   all  derived  works.     Please  use  the  following   aGribu4on:   “Colm  O’hEocha,   AgileInnova4on  Ltd.  2013:   www.agileinnova4on.eu”    
  3. 3. Scrum  –  CommiGed  Sprint  Work  Items   Commitment:  To  Work  Items   •  Well  Groomed/Understood  Items   •  Acceptance  Criteria/Tests  Predefined   •  Short  Planning  Horizon   •  Evidence  Based  Planning   •  Explicit  Policies  (e.g.  DoD)   •  Stable,  Cross-­‐Func4onal  Team   •  Fast  Feedback  (Inspect  &  Adapt)   Commitment  to  Sprint  Plan:  100%  Velocity  means  we’ll  ‘fail’  half  the  4me     Lets  Protect  Ourselves:  Build  in  a  ‘Con4ngency’  (or  two)   Parkinson's  Law:  Work  expands  to  fill  4me  allocated  to  it   Work  Takes  Longer   How  we  Build  Predictability  (and  commit):   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  4. 4. Scrum  –  Forecast  Sprint  Work  Items   Commitment:  To  Goal   Forecast:  To  Work  Items   •  Well  Groomed/Understood  Items   •  Acceptance  Criteria/Tests  Predefined   •  Short  Planning  Horizon   •  Evidence  Based  Planning   •  Explicit  Policies  (e.g.  DoD)   •  Stable,  Cross-­‐Func4onal  Team   •  Fast  Feedback  (Inspect  &  Adapt)   Commitment  to  Sprint  Goal:  100%  Velocity  means  we’ll  never  ‘fail’   No  need  to  build  in  a  Con4ngency.  Precise  Es4ma4on  not  so  important   Predictable  delivery  of  Sprint  Goal,  not  individual  work  items   Team  Output  Improves     How  we  Build  Predictability  (and  commit):   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  5. 5. Scrum  –Some  Un-­‐Planned  Demand   Commitment:  To  Goal   Forecast:  To  Work  Items   (70-­‐80%  of  Velocity)   •  Well  Groomed/Understood  Items   •  Acceptance  Criteria/Tests  Predefined   •  Short  Planning  Horizon   •  Evidence  Based  Planning   •  Explicit  Policies  (e.g.  DoD)   •  Stable,  Cross-­‐Func4onal  Team   •  Fast  Feedback  (Inspect  &  Adapt)   Commitment  to  Sprint  Goal:  70-­‐80%  Velocity  means  we’ll  (probably)  never  ‘fail’   Con4ngency  already  built  in  (for  un-­‐planned  work).  Precise  Es4ma4on  not  so  important   Predictable  delivery  of  Sprint  Goal  may  be  undermined  (un-­‐planned  work)   Weakens  Planning,  dilutes  Visibility  &  Predictability  from  the  Team   How  we  Build  Predictability  (and  commit):   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  6. 6. Some  Scrum  Assump4ons   (that  we  may  not  be  able  to  sa4sfy)   •  All  work  items  are  known,  understood  and   es4mable  (for  the  next  sprint)   – Bugs  (soeware,  hardware,  infrastructure,…)   – Deploying  to  Customer  Equipment   – Integra4ng  Hardware  from  New  Suppliers,…   •  All  work  items  can  be  right-­‐sized  to  a  sprint   •  All  work  Items  can  be  delivered  at  Sprint  End   •  We  work  in  cross-­‐func4onal  teams  7±2   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  7. 7. Agile/Lean  Delivery  Models   Timeboxed   Scrum,  XP,  FDD,…   Flow  Based   Kanban,…?   •  Work  Planned  based  on  Available  Capacity   •  Scope  Fixed,  Dura4on  Variable   •  Commitment  -­‐>  Waste  Elimina4on   •  Macro  &  Micro  Level  Pull   •  Work  Planned  to  fit  the  Timebox   •  Dura4on  Fixed,  Scope  Variable   •  Commitment  -­‐>  Es4ma4on  &  Planning   •  Macro  Level  –  Pull;  Micro  Level  -­‐  Push   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  8. 8. Sprint   Backlog   To  Do   In  Progress   Done   t1 t2 t3 t5 t6t7 t4 t9 t8 t10 t13 t11 t12 t14 S1 S2 S3 S4 Scrum  Board  
  9. 9. Input  Q   (4)   Find  It  (2)   Fix  It  (4)   Test  (3)   Ready  to   Deploy   Deployed   In  Progress   Done   In  Progress   Done   1 2 3 5 6 7 49 810 13 11 12 14 Kanban  Mechanics  in  a  Nutshell  
  10. 10. IteraLon  Based  (Scrum)   Flow  Based  (Kanban)   Focus  on  maximising  work  done  in  an  sprint   (max  Velocity)   Focus  on  minimising  the  4me  to  get  a  piece   of  work  from  start  to  finish  (min  Cycle  Time)   WIP  limited  indirectly  (per  sprint)   WIP  limited  directly  (per  workflow  state)   Somewhat  Predictable,  Es4mable  Work   Interrupt  Driven,  Highly  Variable  Demand   Sprints  Immutable  (by  Work  Items  or  Goal)   Finish  something  before  you  start  something   else  (expedi4ng  excep4onal)   Scope  extends  to  work  of  the  Team   Scope  extends  across  a  Value  Stream   Scope  Can  Vary   Scope  Oeen  Fixed   Predictability  Paramount   Responsiveness  Paramount   Any  type  of  (Plannable)  Work   Design  for  the  Work  Expected:  WIT,  CoS,  SLA   Coupled  I/O  cadence   Decoupled  I/O  Cadences   Periodic  Retrospec4ves   Stop  the  Line  –  Fix  as  it  Happens   X-­‐Func4onal,  Generalizing  Teams  (7±2)   High  Specializa4on  with  Hand-­‐Offs  Possible   Scrum  &  Kanban  Summary  -­‐  Differences   10   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  11. 11. •  Scrum   –  Teams  may  struggle  to  break  up  work,  deliver   poten;ally  releasable  product,  achieve  transparency  &   joint  responsibility   –  Management  may  struggle  to  allow  self-­‐organisa;on,   variable  scope  and  to  maintain  sprint  discipline   •  Kanban   –  Teams  may  struggle  with  a  lack  of  prescribed   structure  (e.g.  cadence  of  events,  Scrum  roles)   –  Management  may  struggle  with  a  lack  of   commitment,  milestones  and  ‘big-­‐bang’  change   11   Both  are  Simple,  Neither  are  Easy   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  12. 12. •  Visualising  your  value  stream   •  Defining  WITs,  CoS,  Policies   •  Managing  Flow  –  Balancing  Demand  to  Capacity,   Handling  BoGlenecks   •  Stakeholder  Engagement  Models   •  Input  &  Output  Cadences   •  Metrics  &  Repor4ng   •  Scaling  Kanban   •  Managing  Variability   Kanban  for  Complex  Domains:   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on   Colm  O’hEocha   AgileInnova4on  Limited           www.agileinnova4on.ie   Colm@agileinnova4on.ie  
  13. 13. •  Services   –  Pre  and  Post  Agile  Adop;on  Assessments   –  Working  with  Senior  Management  on  agile  adop;on  strategies,   re-­‐structuring,  re-­‐skilling   –  Kanban  Bootstrap  –  a  structured  approach  to  implemen;ng   Kanban   •  Training  and  Coaching   –  Professional  ScrumMaster  and  PMI  Agile  Cer4fied  Prac44oner   –  Succeeding  with  Agile  and  Scrum  –  an  Agile  Primer  for  the  Team   –  Geung  Lean  with  Kanban   –  Execu4ve  Briefings  on  Agile  and  Lean  in  IT  –  benefits,  challenges  and  strategies   –  Product  Owner  Training   –  Agile  Requirements  –  User  Stories  and  Es4ma4on   –  Agile  Tes4ng   13   Agile  Innova;on   Lean/Agile  Training,  Coaching,  Consul;ng   Copyright  ©  2013  AgileInnova4on  
  14. 14. This  material  is  Copyright   Protected  under  the  following   Crea4ve  Commons  License:     AGribu4on-­‐ShareAlike  3.0     Please  use  this  material  freely   and  derive  further  work  from  it.   BUT,  aGribu4on  must  be  given   to  the  original  author,  and   these  same  rights  must  govern   all  derived  works.     Please  use  the  following   aGribu4on:   “Colm  O’hEocha,   AgileInnova4on  Ltd.  2010:   www.agileinnova4on.eu”    

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