THE                                              ABOUT     MAKING DOLLS                          AND     DOLL CLOTHES     ...
1951         GARDEN CITY BOOKS Copyright, 1951, by franklin Watts, Inc.      PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES ATTHE COUNTRY LI...
CONTENTSChapter 1 POPPETS AND BABES                                9Chapter 2     COTTON BABY AND PING-PONG               ...
POPPETS AND BABES                   s long as there have been little girls in theworld, there have been dolls. We know thi...
An ancient Egyptian Paddle                                   Doll about 4000 years old.                                   ...
and legs that could be swung back and forth. Many of thedolls had their clothes modeled right on them, while othershad to ...
A pair of extremely old dolls found in "Mediterranean countries.7he left one is of baked clay and is crudely painted. She ...
Many different materials were used to make dolls: left, bone,middle, clay; right, ivory.These also are very old.its own pe...
Celeste and Louise, a pair of French bisque dolls dressed in the       height of fashion. Made about 1870, each doll had h...
Bisque dolls are another kind of china doll that col-lectors love to get. Bisque is a fine pink-toned china thathas been u...
for his granddaughters. The beauty and charm of Celesteand Louise and their exquisite wardrobes immediately cap-tured his ...
could dress and undress them as often asthey wanted to without worrying about finelace and exquisite embroidery becomingso...
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pensive toys, and, of course, the Penny Woodens, werejust some of the things you could get.    It was an adventure to be a...
1. "Braided flax doll. 2. French dolls with chinaheads, legs, and arms, kidskin bodies. 3. Pennywooden dolls, two inches h...
and shoulders were molded in one piece with the head.Mother or Aunt Mary usually bought them; made thebody, arms and legs ...
It is fascinating to make dolls for yourself. There areso many different ways of doing it and so many differentkinds of ma...
COTTON BABY AND PING-PONG PATSY                   ave you a tiny soft baby doll just theright size to fit into a doll-hous...
COTTON BABY. 1. "Roll upcotton and tie. 2. Cover top withthin layer of cotton to makehead. Tear pieces up frombottom to ma...
layers. Use two layers for the Cotton Baby and keep thethird layer for another doll.   Roll up one layer rather loosely. T...
Double the arm-piece under until the end of it touchesthe body. Wind string around the arm-piece, as shown,and anchor it b...
will drag the fibers and make a mess. One dot is usuallysufficient for the eye on a doll this tiny. If, however, itseems t...
A very pretty cap can be made from a small bit of lace-paper doily. Cut a piece from the edge of the doily thesame size an...
bend the flap down. Press it smoothly onto the back of thecap. Hold it in place for a moment.   Since this Cotton Baby is ...
Babys shawl can be made from a piece of thin silk or cot-      ton in a soft, pale color. It should be 21/2 in. wide and  ...
pattern for it carefully and accurately, the jacket will turnout very well. A very thin material of yellow, blue, or pinkw...
PING-PONG PATSY is made with a hand-     kerchief, ping-pong ball, and a roll of cot-     ton. She can have two faces, a s...
seams together. Make the side seams by lapping the frontside over the back. Keep the seams as narrow as possible.Press the...
"Baby" faces must always be drawn or painted on the lower halfof the dolls face to make them babyish!pencils for the eyes ...
Body   Ping-Pong Patsy really needs some kind of stuffing. Ab-sorbent cotton will fill her body out nicely. Unroll cottona...
shown on page 3 5 and use it to cut out the shape needed.Put a line of small cement dots along the very edge of theside ma...
Circular cape is simple                                            to make. Told circle                                   ...
Jacket   You can make either a jacket or a dress for Patsy fromthe same pattern. For a dress, make the jacket pattern38Bro...
longer. You will need material 5 in. wide and 71/2 in. longfor the jacket; 5 in. wide and 13 in. long for the dress.Trace ...
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PAPER DOLLS                 id you know that long ago there used tobe very elaborate paper dolls which were manufacturedex...
the new fashions in womens clothes and were also verypopular. One of these mannequins and her wardrobe isshown below. She ...
ballet dancer, or beauty. Their costumes were copied fromthe real clothes worn by the people they were supposed tobe. They...
Joined string of paper dolls cut from folded paper.        string of little dolls, although hed only cut out one! That    ...
Modern pattern for a string of "dressed-up" paper dolts.  Select a nice clean p iece of heavy white or cream-coloredpaper....
We know that each fold must be 3 in. wide and 53/4 in.tall. The number of folds you make in the paper will deter-mine the ...
ankles, will indicate socks. Color the slippers brown, black,red, or green.    Now make the backs of the dolls match the f...
Cut out double dresses for each of the other dolls, usingdifferent colored papers for each. They could be polka-dotted, pl...
paper. Belts are very narrow strips cut from dark-coloredpapers. Wider belts may be made from silver or gold orcolored sco...
piece. The loops are periodically invisible and the dollswill look as if they are dancing on air.Standing Doll StringIf yo...
The marvelous thing about the dresses you can make foryour own paper dolls is that they can actually look likereal gowns, ...
Trace this design to make yourown paper doll. By making herbald it is possible to change herhair-dos as frequently as herd...
Dressing the Doll   Now the really exciting part begins. Make a fresh trac-ing of just the costume on another piece of pap...
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of paste. Press these edges down firmly. Place the othergathered edge along the paste line at the bottom of thesleeve. Pre...
paper pasted across the waistline will look like a belt, aswell as cover the seam line if it did not turn out smoothly.Tri...
wrapping or wallpaper to show that it holds somethingvery special and valuable. Keep your collection of papersand trimming...
A doll house bride and groom                                made of paper.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemak...
THE DOLL HOUSE FAMILY                he most attractive little dolls can be madefor your doll house. Crepe paper, absorben...
full-size dolls; four for the child-size. The method of twist-      ing the cleaners is shown in Figures 1,2, and 3 of the...
peach-colored crepe paper. Bind each part at neck, wrists,and ankles with sewing thread. The frame should look likeFigure ...
in the circles. Don’t press hard, or the pencil tip will tearthe soft paper face. A semi-circle in red will give the bride...
twelve is enough to start with. Place a line of Duco cementfrom the forehead straight back across the top of the head.Lay ...
Gown    The bridal gown is one of the most striking costumesyou can make. It can be made of white, ivory, or any palepaste...
SLEEVE                                      PATTERN               7be doll house brides dress pattern.bottoms of the sleev...
Tbe doll house grooms suit pattern.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
Fold the ribbon in half, lengthwise, and tie a piece of rib-bon around each wrist; make a double knot and then cutoff the ...
Suit   The pattern for the grooms suit is on page 66. Blackcrepe paper is used for trousers and coat/ white writingpaper f...
make a brown wool wig. This is not too hard to do and itcertainly looks handsome when finished."Wig   The best yarn to mak...
7he doll house fathers every-     day jacket pattern uses tube     sleeves like those of the groom.     The doll house chi...
Make the brides dress knee length, of colored paper,add a flat white collar, and it becomes a schoolgirls frock.By making ...
trim the dresses is to paste very narrow cotton lace aroundneckline and bottoms of sleeves. If the lace you have is toowid...
that can stand up by themselves. They can be made to doso by using self-hardening clay to model good supportingfeet for yo...
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THE RAG DOLL                he rag doll belongs to a family noted for itsgreat hardiness, sweet disposition, and comfortab...
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pealing to us all. Shes easy to make and easy to dress. Inher own individual way, she is also quite pretty.How   TO   MAKE...
Needle, thread, thimble, and scissors are the tools withwhich the doll is put together. It is possible to sew the dollbody...
A variety of faces to be drawn, painted, or     embroidered on the rag doll. Copy, or de-     sign your own. Embroidered e...
pencil. Unpin the pattern. Baste the two pieces of materialtogether with short running stitches, 1/4 in. inside of theoutl...
permanent. Bead features, though extremely gay and at-tractive looking, will break off unless the doll is handledcarefully...
or wooden meat skewer halfway into the head stuffing andhalfway into the chest. This makes the "neck" and willkeep the hea...
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top of forehead. Stitch across front of head, along dotted line,as shown in Figure 2. Lap the fabric back, like Figure 3, ...
SHOE PATTERNLay "fold" edge of pattern along the fold of material andcut out. Hem the legs first, then sew up the side sea...
cut the same way. Sew up the side seams of the slip. Makea narrow hem at top of slip and a 1/4-in. hem along thebottom. Wh...
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The straps must be snug around the ankle. If 1 in. is toolong, cut the excess off so theyll fit perfectly.Dress   Right no...
7he puffed-sleeve bodice is cut                                         according to pattern above. Shirr                 ...
Make the narrowest hem you can around the neckline and the bottom of the sleeves. Now gather the sleeves between the point...
The waistline of the dress is not quite as snug as youmay think it should be. This was planned on purpose,because it is ea...
cut out the circle. Fold the circle in half and in half again.Cut off the point 1/2 in. away from the top fold. Curve thec...
An Everyday Dress   A pleated skirt with the same bodice makes a very at-tractive daytime dress. Checked gingham (use only...
giving her a real baby dress you can make her into a sweet little baby.    Six-strand embroidery floss (used with a long-e...
close to where the floss came out. Let the needle tip comeout again a short distance away and draw the threadthrough. Thes...
MODELED RAG DOLLS                    ometime ago a special kind of doll came to   this country from Italy. These dolls wer...
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tractive. The head is made from three separate pieces. Itis quite round and even has a cute little snub-nosed profile.How ...
PATTERN FOR BONNIE. 1.                                    BODY: cut two. 2. FACE: cut                                    t...
absorbent cotton or wool batting. The drawings show how    to place the arms and legs against the body. Turn in top    edg...
The pattern for the head shows exactly where to placethe eyes and mouth. Punch pinholes along the lines show-ing the eyes ...
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
Making Dolls and Doll Clothes
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A book published in 1961 that is now in the public domain on how to make dolls and doll clothes. Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com

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Making Dolls and Doll Clothes

  1. 1. THE ABOUT MAKING DOLLS AND DOLL CLOTHES BY CATHERINE ROBERTS Illustrated by the Author EDITED BY HELEN HOKE GARDEN CITY BOOKS Garden City, New York BY ARRANGEMENT WITH FRANKLIN WATTS< INC.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  2. 2. 1951 GARDEN CITY BOOKS Copyright, 1951, by franklin Watts, Inc. PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES ATTHE COUNTRY LIFE PRESS, GARDEN CITY, N.Y.Brought to you byhttp://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  3. 3. CONTENTSChapter 1 POPPETS AND BABES 9Chapter 2 COTTON BABY AND PING-PONG PATSY 11Chapter 3 PAPER DOLLS 41Chapter 4 THE DOLL HOUSE FAMILY 59Chapter 5 THE RAG DOLL 75Chapter 6 MODELED RAG DOLLS 97Chapter 7 CHARACTER DOLLS 109Chapter 8 DOLLS WITH HARD HEADS 128Chapter 9 DOLL-DRESSMAKING AND DESIGNING 147Chapter10 DOLL ACCESSORIES 166Chapter 11 TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES 178Index 189Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  4. 4. POPPETS AND BABES s long as there have been little girls in theworld, there have been dolls. We know this is so becausescientists have found many dolls in strange and forgottenplaces. By studying these dolls, historians and scientistshave learned a great deal about people who lived thou-sands of years ago. Some of these dolls are very odd-looking. One doll,made from a flat piece of wood, belonged to a little girlwho lived in Thebes, Egypt, four thousand years ago. Wecall it a tfPaddle Doll" because it looks like a short, smallpaddle. The curved blade is the body and the small handleis the head. Attached to the head are many strings of tinybeads. No, they are not supposed to be hair. In those daysfashionable women shaved their heads and wore thickheavy wigs braided into hundreds of stiff little pigtails thatfell down to their shoulders. The Paddle Dolls bead wiglooks just like tiny pigtails. Designs were painted on the 9Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  5. 5. An ancient Egyptian Paddle Doll about 4000 years old. Blue beads make the hair and the dress is painted on the thin wood.doll to look like the trimming that decorated the slim, flatdresses of that time. Undoubtedly this doll was consideredvery elegant and lovely, although she looks strange andawkward to us. Other Egyptian dolls, equally old, look a good dealmore like the ones we are used to seeing. They werecarved in wood, with movable arms, and had real hairglued to their heads. You can see them today in NewYorks Metropolitan Museum of Art and will find themnot too different in size and shape from the wooden dollsGrandmothers mother had. As long ago as twenty-five hundred years, there wereshops in which nothing but dolls, toys, and dolls furniturewere sold. There were so many of these shops at one timein Athens, Greece, that the street where they were locatedwas called the Street of the Dolls. All kinds of dolls couldbe bought there: fat ones and thin ones, pretty ones andplain ones. Some had movable arms. Others had both arms10 Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhom emaking.com
  6. 6. and legs that could be swung back and forth. Many of thedolls had their clothes modeled right on them, while othershad to be dressed at home. Dolls made of all kinds of materials have been foundin faraway lands. Bone, ivory, stone, and wood were carvedto look like real people. Straw, reeds, leaves, and clothwere wrapped or braided or twisted into doll shapes. Claywas modeled and baked to produce lifelike dolls. In this country, long before any white men had cometo live here, Indian children had dolls made from cornhusks, corn cobs, birch bark, leather, pine cones, and wood.They saw their first European doll in 1584, when one wasgiven to a little Indian girl by an Englishman who hadsailed to this country with Sir Walter Raleigh. The Eng-lish had come to explore and to settle in this country. Withthem was an artist, John White, who came to draw picturesof all the new and wonderful things white men had neverseen before. One of his pictures showed an Indian childholding a beautiful English doll in one hand and a babysrattle strung with bells in the other hand. That picture wastaken back to England and preserved among the records ofthe expedition. It is only recently that we have used the word "doll."For a long time dolls were called "poppets" or "babes" or"babies." Sometimes in reading old books one comes acrossother names, such as "mannikin," "idol," "image." AskGrandmother what she called a doll. She will probably tellyou she called it a "doll-baby," but that, naturally, it had 11Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  7. 7. A pair of extremely old dolls found in "Mediterranean countries.7he left one is of baked clay and is crudely painted. She wears abowl on her head. The other doll is an old Roman rag doll madeof linen and stuffed with reeds. He is in pretty good shape forbeing i500 years old.12Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  8. 8. Many different materials were used to make dolls: left, bone,middle, clay; right, ivory.These also are very old.its own personal name. During her childhood all dolls hadnames. Sometimes the dolls came with names given to themby the manufacturer. Usually a particular and special namewas selected for each doll by its young owner. Many of the dolls now in museums are still known bythe names given to them long ago. The names of othershave been lost and now they just have labels which say"Wooden Doll" or "China Doll" or "Composition Doll." That is the way museum people and doll collectors iden-tify old dolls. The label tells what they are made of, whichsometimes also tells about how old they are. Wooden dollscan be very, very old or just medium old. Compositionand china dolls can be anywhere from 125 years old tovery young dolls made just this year. 13Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  9. 9. Celeste and Louise, a pair of French bisque dolls dressed in the height of fashion. Made about 1870, each doll had her own trunk and a wardrobe of a hundred and twenty-five pieces. 14Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  10. 10. Bisque dolls are another kind of china doll that col-lectors love to get. Bisque is a fine pink-toned china thathas been used for doll heads for the past ninety years. Itis quite different from the regular kind of china doll head,which is pure white and has painted hair and features. Celeste and Louise, shown on the opposite page, are twoFrench bisque dolls made near Paris, France, about sev-enty-five years ago. They were made in a large factorywhere dozens and dozens of people did nothing but makedoll bodies and doll heads. After the head, body, arms, andlegs were put together, the supervisor examined each dollto see that every curl was perfect, that the heads turnedeasily, and that the arms and legs moved correctly. Celesteand Louise passed these tests very satisfactorily. They were then sent to Paris to be dressed as YoungLadies of Fashion. Special dressmakers worked long hoursto make beautiful clothes, hats, shoes, gloves, and shawlsfor the dolls. Skilled craftsmen made tiny eyeglasses, fans,pill boxes, watches, and jewelry. Others made pocketbooksand umbrellas. When finished, everything was packed intominiature trunks that had curved tops, each with one dollsname on it. The small bonnets and hats were packed intotheir own boxes. Each doll had a special traveling case tocarry her shawl, umbrella, handkerchief, bottle of eau decologne, and book. Thus equipped, Celeste and Louisewere ready to begin their travels. Soon after they were on display in a Paris doll shop, anAmerican gentleman from Boston came in to find presents 15Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  11. 11. for his granddaughters. The beauty and charm of Celesteand Louise and their exquisite wardrobes immediately cap-tured his attention. He bought them and had them spe-cially packed for the long sea voyage across the Atlanticocean to America. When Celeste and Louise were unpacked in the frontparlor of the tall brownstone house in Boston, they weregreeted with cries of admiration and joy and excitement.They were examined from head to toe. Each dress, eachpiece of jewelry and pair of shoes was tried on, taken off,and tried on again. Since the dolls were exactly the samesize, they could exchange things, so each had twice as manyclothes as was originally intended. The grownups were having just as much fun as the chil-dren. Because the lovely clothes came from Paris, thefashion center of the world, they were of great interest toMother and Grandmother and all the aunts. Pretty soonit began to seem as if Grandfather had brought the dollsfor the women instead of for little Mary and Susan. Forthem, the fun of receiving these beautiful gifts was disap-pearing because the dolls had to be handled so carefully.In fact, the dolls were put away, to be taken out and playedwith only on very special occasions. Mary and Susan really didnt mind not having Celesteand Louise for everyday play. The girls had more fun withthe wooden peg dolls their grandmother had given themlast year. They could wash their wooden faces, spank them,or carry them around by one leg, without harm. They16Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  12. 12. could dress and undress them as often asthey wanted to without worrying about finelace and exquisite embroidery becomingsoiled or damaged. All in all, they agreed,Grandfather was a darling to get them suchterribly expensive gifts, but it was muchmore fun to have common wooden poppets toreally play with. These wooden poppets, or Penny Wood-ens, as they are sometimes called, are amongthe most fascinating dolls ever made. Theirlegs and arms could be moved into very life-like positions. Their heads and bodies,carved in one piece, could survive the roughesttreatment. Their painted faces suffered, it istrue, from too many washings or from beingleft out in the rain, but that was not tooserious an injury. Someone in the family could alwaysrepaint the face when needed. Best of all, they cost so littlethat almost any child could afford to have a family of them.An uncle or a brother who was clever at whittling couldmake a Penny Wooden in a very short time. In NewEngland, if the men of the family were not so talented, thepoppets could be bought for a penny in any Cent Shop. Cent Shops were the most delightful of all old-timestores. Most of the things sold in them were just for chil-dren; candy and cookies, displayed it} tall glass jars withfancy glass tops, small dolls made of wax or china, inex- 17Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  13. 13. Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  14. 14. pensive toys, and, of course, the Penny Woodens, werejust some of the things you could get. It was an adventure to be allowed to go to the Cent Shopall by oneself. When the door opened with a tinkle of itslittle warning bell, there was a delicious smell of cinnamonsticks, gingerbread men, licorice drops, and hoarhoundlozenges. There in a little glass case all by themselves werethe penny dolls. On the shelves behind were ranged themore expensive dolls that cost five, ten, fifteen, or twenty-five cents each. It took time to decide just how to spend a penny. Youcould get five peppermint drops, or one gingerbread man,or a wax baby, or a Penny Wooden. The decision wasVery important because it might be a full month or morebefore you got another penny. The wax babies were small and pretty. So were thechina ones. But they were made all in one piece so that theirarms and legs could not be moved. That made them hardto dress. The more expensive wax and china babies hadmovable arms, but even the tiniest wooden one had bothlegs and arms that moved. On a special shelf were the doll heads of various sizes.They were made of glossy white china and had shiny blackpainted hair, blue eyes, pink cheeks, and tiny rosebudmouths. Sometimes, but not often, you could find a chinahead with brown eyes, and once in a very great while youmight even get a gray-eyed doll head. These heads were really more than heads, for the neck 19Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  15. 15. 1. "Braided flax doll. 2. French dolls with chinaheads, legs, and arms, kidskin bodies. 3. Pennywooden dolls, two inches high. 4. 7wig withacorn head doll. 5. Wooden mixing spoondressed up. 6. Very fancy doll made from cornhusks.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  16. 16. and shoulders were molded in one piece with the head.Mother or Aunt Mary usually bought them; made thebody, arms and legs of cloth; then glued the head onto thebody. In larger stores, one could buy bodies already made,as well as china arms and legs to sew on to a homemadebody. The china parts were made in Germany and shippedto this country in great packing cases that held hundredsof each size. They were sold all over this country and werevery much cheaper than dolls are today. Most of thesechina dolls were "lady" dolls to be dressed in grown-upfashions. They were the mamas of the doll family. Thedoll in the picture, page 18, with its homemade body, arms,and legs, is an unusual "little girl doll" of the 1840s. The children of the doll family usually were homemadeof cloth or wood. Dolls were frequently made by grown-ups for their children. Then, of course, children themselveshave always increased their doll families by making someof their own. Many different kinds of materials and objects werepressed into service. A hank of flax could be braided tolook like a doll, or an acorn could be stuck on the end of atwig to serve the purpose for the time being. Skillful fingerscould contrive really elaborate dressed dolls, using cornhusks and silk for the working materials. A string tiedaround a rolled up rag or a piece of wool or cotton battingtransformed a common material into a very acceptable"doll-baby." 21Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  17. 17. It is fascinating to make dolls for yourself. There areso many different ways of doing it and so many differentkinds of materials to use. Dolls can be made and dressedwithout a bit of sewing: little ones that can be turned outquickly from odd scraps of materials, and more elaborateones that are round and soft, and paper dolls whose dress-maker costumes are cut, shirred, and pleated just like realfabric clothes. The following chapters describe how to make a numberof different kinds of dolls. There are easy ones and moredifficult ones. There are patterns and directions and draw-ings to make doll-making easy for you, no matter whatkind you want. Making dolls and their clothes is fun! Letsstart right now!22Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  18. 18. COTTON BABY AND PING-PONG PATSY ave you a tiny soft baby doll just theright size to fit into a doll-house-size baby carriage, onethat is even soft and small enough to be held in the armsof the mother doll? You cant buy a doll like this, but youcan make one in about fifteen minutes. The picture on the next page shows one. It is a CottonBaby, looking for all the world like a sweet little four-month-old infant. I call her a Cotton Baby because thatis what she is made of: soft, white absorbent cotton. Absorbent cotton, sometimes called surgical cotton, isperfect for making this kind and many other kinds of dolls.You can buy it in a drugstore or dime store. The two-ouncepackage will supply the makings for several kinds of babies.How TO M A KE THE C OTTON B ABY Unroll part of the cotton from its blue paper wrappersCut off a piece 21/2 in. long. Separate this piece into threeBrought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  19. 19. COTTON BABY. 1. "Roll upcotton and tie. 2. Cover top withthin layer of cotton to makehead. Tear pieces up frombottom to make arms. 3. Bendpieces under and tie in place withthread. Hair and features aremade with water-color pencils.Brought to you byhttp://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  20. 20. layers. Use two layers for the Cotton Baby and keep thethird layer for another doll. Roll up one layer rather loosely. Tie a piece of whitestring around the roll about 1/2 in. from one end. Tie thisquite tight to make the neck. The short knob becomes thehead; the longer piece is the body. It should look like thesketch % 1 shown at the left.Head Use the second layer of cotton to cover the head. If itseems too thick, make it thinner by pulling off a thin layer.Cover the head with this thin layer and tie it on by wrap-ping thin string around the neck, as shown. Tie the stringtwice to keep it from coming undone. Turn the smoothest part of the head toward you. Thispart will be Cotton Babys face. Lay her on the table, faceup. Be sure table is clean.Arms Starting at the bottom on the right side, gently tear astrip of cotton out and away from the body part. Do nottear it off completely but leave it attached to the body atthe neck. This piece, which should be not quite 1 in. wideand about 1/8 in. thick, will make the right arm and hand. 25Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  21. 21. Double the arm-piece under until the end of it touchesthe body. Wind string around the arm-piece, as shown,and anchor it by tying it at the neck. Do not wind thestring here as tightly as you did to make the neck. It shouldbe just tight enough to give a nicely rounded little armwith a fat little hand at the end of it. The left arm is madein the same way. Fluff out the bottom of the doll by gently separating thecotton. It will look like a pretty little white dress. The endsof the head covering can be made to disappear by lightlystroking them down until they blend with the body. Face The easiest way of giving the Cotton Baby eyes, mouth,and hair is to put them on with Venus water-color pencils.(These pencils come in boxes of various sizes holdingquite an assortment of colors. Its a good idea to get a sup-ply of colors because theyll play quite an important partin future doll-making sessions. They can be sharpened tovery fine points and used in place of paints simply by dip-ping the pencil points in water before drawing with them.)Azure blue is nice for the eyes, scarlet for the mouth, sepiafor brown hair and eyes, and golden ochre for blond hair. Have very sharp points on the pencils you use. Dip thetip of the pencil in water, then touch it to the cotton. Donot try to draw on the cotton because the wet pencil tip26Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  22. 22. will drag the fibers and make a mess. One dot is usuallysufficient for the eye on a doll this tiny. If, however, itseems too small, make another dot right beside it so that ittouches the first dot. The second eye must be made exactlythe same size and on a straight line with the first eye. Thisis surprisingly difficult to get right. In fact, it is the hardestthing there is to do in making this or any other doll. The mouth, made with the scarlet pencil, is actually alittle line. Touch the side of the wet pencil tip to the face. Use the side of the golden ochre pencil for the hair. Wetthe tip each time before adding another little line of yellowto the head. These will turn out very unevenly but thatmakes the hair look more natural. You can get the effectof a tiny curl or two on the babys forehead by making aseries of little dots in curly lines. Remember, when work-ing on absorbent cotton, to just touch the surface with thepencil. Never try to draw a line. That can be done onother materials, such as cloth or papier-mache or clay, butnot on absorbent cotton. Thats all there is to making the Cotton Baby. She isvery pretty just as she is and will look very sweet and at-tractive in the doll-mothers arms or lying in her crib.Why not leave her there and make a second Cotton Babyfor the carriage? This one will need a little cap and jacketor shawl to keep her warm while riding. These little gar-ments are easy to make. The patterns are right here foryou to follow. 27Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  23. 23. A very pretty cap can be made from a small bit of lace-paper doily. Cut a piece from the edge of the doily thesame size and shape as the cap pattern. Be sure to cut thetwo slashes shown in the pattern. They are needed to makethe cap fit snugly to the head. Put a small drop of Ducocement on the part marked A. Lap edge marked B overand press onto the cement dot at A. Hold this seam to-gether with your fingers for a moment or two to give thecement a chance to start sticking. The square flap that nowsticks out is to be cemented down to cover this back seam.Put three dots of cement along the inside bottom edge and 28Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  24. 24. bend the flap down. Press it smoothly onto the back of thecap. Hold it in place for a moment. Since this Cotton Baby is going to stay in her carriage,you might as well stick her cap on for keeps. Put a fewdrops of cement along the inside of the bottom of the cap.Put the cap on and press it to the head. Hold it in place amoment so the cement will grip. Caps of woven material that is fine and soft can be madeby this same method. Handkerchief linen, lawn, or batisteturns out prettily. Cut it with a very sharp scissors. Theedges do not need hemming. Another pretty cap can be made from a piece of cottonlace edging. The lace should be one inch wide and longenough to fit over the dolls head from jaw to jaw. Care-fully cut off the top edge of the lace (not the fancy edge,for that makes the front of the cap). Cutting the boundedge makes fitting to the head easier. Put a thin line ofcement along the three cut edges of the lace, smoothing itwith the flat side of a toothpick. Lay the lace on the dollshead with the fancy edge framing the face. Press the ce-mented edges to the head with the fingers. If the lace doesnot quite meet at the back, cover the gap by pasting on asmall oval cut from another piece of lace.Shawl What kind of wrap shall she wear? Baby princesseswear delicate shawls until they are six months old. Cotton 29Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  25. 25. Babys shawl can be made from a piece of thin silk or cot- ton in a soft, pale color. It should be 21/2 in. wide and 41/4 in. long. Fold it in half the long way and cut it as shown above. Open it and put it on the doll. See how nicely it fits her tiny neck without bunching up. Cross the ends over her chest and draw them to the back under her arms. Pin the ends together with a tiny safety pin. The triangular back of the shawl will cover the pin. Carriage Blanket A little carriage blanket, cut from matching material, would be pretty. Make it 3 in. long and 21/4 in. wide. Pull out three or four threads from all four sides to make a fringed edge. Jacket Perhaps you would like a wee jacket for the baby doll. This is somewhat harder to make, but if you follow the 30Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  26. 26. pattern for it carefully and accurately, the jacket will turnout very well. A very thin material of yellow, blue, or pinkwould be charming. Maybe the Doll House is drafty, sothis jacket could be worn by the first Cotton Baby. Itwould dress her up nicely for visitors to admire. Trace the jacket pattern on very thin paper. Cut it out.The material for the jacket should be 31/2 in. long and 3 in.wide. Fold it in half so that it is 13/4 in. long and 3 in. wide.Pin the paper pattern to it so the shoulder line of the pat-tern is even with the fold line of the material. Cut out thejacket, then cut it up the center front from bottom to neck-line. Make tiny slashes with the scissors just where thesleeves meet the body. The slashes make it much easier topaste the seams together. Rub a narrow line of cement along the edge of one sideof the sleeve. Lap the other edge over the cemented lineand press it down with the fingers. Join the second seam inthe same way. Let the sleeves dry before putting the side 31Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  27. 27. PING-PONG PATSY is made with a hand- kerchief, ping-pong ball, and a roll of cot- ton. She can have two faces, a sleeping and a wide-awake one. Shes easy32Brought to you byhttp://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  28. 28. seams together. Make the side seams by lapping the frontside over the back. Keep the seams as narrow as possible.Press them together with the fingers and allow the cementto dry thoroughly before putting the jacket on the doll. Ifthe sleeves are a little bit too long, either turn them backinto tiny cuffs or cut the bottoms off to the desired length.How TO M AKE P ING -P ONG P ATSY A somewhat larger doll is quickly made with a ping-pong ball and a ladys handkerchief. Place the ball in the center of the handkerchief, which isthen pulled down tightly around it. Wrap thin whitestring around the folds, both to keep the ball in positionand to give the doll a neck. Keep all the folds and gathersto the side and back so that there will be about half an inchof smooth space for the face. Knot the string.Face You can make this doll without spoiling the handker-chief by giving Ping-Pong Patsy removable eyes andmouth. Tiny circles cut from dark blue paper and a smallhalf-circle cut from red paper will make acceptable fea-tures. Paste them on with library paste. You can peel themoff very easily. To make permanent features, use coloring 33Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  29. 29. "Baby" faces must always be drawn or painted on the lower halfof the dolls face to make them babyish!pencils for the eyes and mouth. This color will not washout. The position of the features is most important on sucha round-headed doll. Hold a string around the middle ofthe head the same way the equator goes around the earth.This is the guideline for placing the eyes. With a sharp-pointed lead pencil, draw a very light line about 1/8 in.long just under and touching the string. The second eye-line is 3/8 in. away from the first one. Draw the eyes andmouth as shown. Patsy is really a double-faced doll! Draw the "sleeping"face on one side of the head, the wide-awake one on theopposite side. Draw the hair as shown on page 32. You canchange her appearance by turning her cap around. 34Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  30. 30. Body Ping-Pong Patsy really needs some kind of stuffing. Ab-sorbent cotton will fill her body out nicely. Unroll cottonand cut off a piece about 6 in. long. Roll this up and put itinside the folds of the handkerchief, pushing it up close tothe neck. The cotton is held in place with two tiny safetypins. They are pinned through from the right side in back.They will not show if they are set up and down instead ofcrosswise because the folds of the handkerchief will con-ceal them.Cap The pattern for Patsys cap is very much like the oneyou used for Cotton Baby. This one takes a piece of mate-rial 31/2 in. long and 21/2 in. wide. Trace the pattern 35Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  31. 31. shown on page 3 5 and use it to cut out the shape needed.Put a line of small cement dots along the very edge of theside marked A. Turn this edge back over the cement dotsin a narrow fold and press it down with the fingers. Thispasted-down hem frames the face. Cement A to B, thencement C down over them.Hair It would be fun to put real-looking hair on Patsy. Youcan do this with fine knitting wool. Choose a nice shade ofbrown, or a gold color. A 5 in. piece will be enough. Cutthis piece into 1/4in. lengths. Now squeeze a thin line of cement right across the topof the head. Spread the cement with a toothpick so that itcomes forward slightly to make the hairline at the fore-head. Place the small pieces of wool, up and down, allacross the cemented area. Pull the pieces at the center ofthe forehead down slightly so that theyre a bit longer thanthe others. While the cement is still wet, gently pull one or two ofthe side pieces back just enough to give an irregular line.You know how a real babys hair grows with a little pointor two in the center and a few wispy ends at the sides ofthe forehead? That is the effect that you want to get onPatsy. It is not necessary to put hair on the rest of the headbecause it wont show. Cement the cap on. 36Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  32. 32. Circular cape is simple to make. Told circle twice and cut off point to make neckline. Cut up front for opening. Cape If Patsy wears a circular cape, she wont need arms. Cut the cape from a piece of colored material, using a saucer to guide you in drawing its outline. Fold the circle of mate- rial in half once, and once again. Cut off 1/4 in. of the point. This makes the neckline. Open the circle and cut it from the bottom up to the neckline to make the front opening. Put the cape on Patsy and hold it together with a tiny safety pin. You could cut a little circular collar from a lace-paper doily to dress up the cape. Cement this in place with a dot or two of Duco. 37Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  33. 33. Jacket You can make either a jacket or a dress for Patsy fromthe same pattern. For a dress, make the jacket pattern38Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  34. 34. longer. You will need material 5 in. wide and 71/2 in. longfor the jacket; 5 in. wide and 13 in. long for the dress.Trace the jacket pattern and then cut it out. Fold the material in half across the short measurement.Pin the pattern to the material, having the shoulder linemeet the fold line of the fabric. Cut it out, then make thecenter slash from bottom to neckline. Sew the seams together with running stitches. The wayto make them is shown in the small sketch along the side ofthe pattern drawing on page 38. Turn back a narrow foldalong the edges of the jacket or dress opening and hold itin place with very small running stitches. Hem the bottomin the same way.Dress If youve made the pattern dress length, put it on Patsybackwards and hold it together at the neckline with a smallsafety pin. Tie a piece of colored knitting wool around herwaist for a belt. The sleeves of jacket or dress are loosely stuffed withabsorbent cotton pushed up inside them to make arms. Leta small piece of cotton extend below the bottom of eachsleeve to give the effect of hands. Now that you know the trick of making these simpledolls, all sorts of ways of changing them will pop into yourhead. See how many different ones you can make. 39Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  35. 35. Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  36. 36. PAPER DOLLS id you know that long ago there used tobe very elaborate paper dolls which were manufacturedexclusively for grown-ups? Those paper dolls were made in France and were quiteexpensive. Both men and women played with countlessnumbers of them. They were printed on sheets, sometimescolored and sometimes only in black and white so that thepurchaser could color them himself. As you can see in thedrawing, which was copied from one of those old sheets,the arms and legs were printed separately to be cut out andattached to the body with strings. When the strings werepulled, the arms and legs moved. This made the figurelook as if it really was dancing. They were called "pan-tins" and were printed by the thousands in many differentstyles of costumes. Another kind of paper doll made just for grown-upswas called a "mannequin”. These were designed to show 41Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  37. 37. the new fashions in womens clothes and were also verypopular. One of these mannequins and her wardrobe isshown below. She was printed and sold in England in1800. There are two things about her that are very in-teresting : she is shown in profile (most paper dolls then,as now, were shown front view) and she was eventuallygiven to a child as a toy. Children were not allowed to playwith the mannequins and pantins because they were toodelicate and too expensive. However, little girls loved the paper mannequins somuch that by 1840 special paper dolls were being manu-factured just for them. These new-style paper dolls wereportraits of famous women of the time; a singer, actress, An English paper mannequin with the latest fashions of 1800.42Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  38. 38. ballet dancer, or beauty. Their costumes were copied fromthe real clothes worn by the people they were supposed tobe. They were printed in lovely colors and made to look asreal as possible. The wonderful thing about these paper dolls was thatalmost anyone could make equally attractive ones for her-self. Any kind of paper could be used for the purpose;fancy wrapping paper, magazine pages, writing paper, oldletters and envelopes, scraps of wallpaper. Paper is suchfascinating stuff to work with that once again the grown-ups started playing with paper dolls, only this time theyexcused themselves by saying they were making them fortheir children! Men, too, liked to work with paper. For the most part,however, they confined their playing to making cutouts.Hans Christian Andersen, famous writer of fairy tales, notonly made a paper doll the heroine of one of his stories(The Little Tin Soldier) but sometimes cut out paperdolls for his young friends. One of these paper dolls is nowdisplayed in the museum in Odense, Denmark. This paperdoll is funny looking to modern eyes, but no doubt Ander-sen and his young friends were delighted with it. Remember, when you were very little, how someone cutout a string of paper dancing dolls for you to play with orto hang on the Christmas tree? The operation was quitemysterious to you then. He folded the paper so quickly,gave a few rapid cuts and snips with the scissors, thendramatically unfolded the cutout and displayed a whole 43Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  39. 39. Joined string of paper dolls cut from folded paper. string of little dolls, although hed only cut out one! That was magic that delighted you both. Once when I was working on such a string my grand- mother asked me why I didnt make little paper dresses to put on each doll! She showed me how to do it and they were so pretty and so much fun that perhaps you, too, will enjoy making ones like them. How TO MAKE A P AP ER D OLL S TR ING If you are good at drawing, you can make your own pattern doll. But it might be a good idea, this first time, to trace the pattern doll shown on the next page. Transfer the tracing to heavy brown wrapping paper, then cut it out. The pattern doll measures 3 in. wide and 4 3/4 in. tall. Dolls smaller than this pattern are much too difficult to dress successfully. 44Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  40. 40. Modern pattern for a string of "dressed-up" paper dolts. Select a nice clean p iece of heavy white or cream-coloredpaper. Good quality shelf or wrapping paper will do verywell. If the paper has creases in it, iron them out just asyou would from a handkerchief. 45Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  41. 41. We know that each fold must be 3 in. wide and 53/4 in.tall. The number of folds you make in the paper will deter-mine the number of dolls you get. It is quite difficult to cutthrough more than six folds. To make a string of six, measure off a piece of paper 18in. long and 6 in. wide. Along both sides of the long edgesmark off 3-in. points to guide the folding. Make accordion(back and forth) folds. Do not fold the paper over andover. Lay the pattern doll on the folded paper so that theedge of each hand just touches the outside edges of thefolds. Carefully trace around the pattern doll. Cut outalong the traced line except around the outside edges ofthe hands. If these edges are cut, you will have six separatedolls instead of a single string of dolls holding hands.finishing the Dolls Unfold the dolls. Now they are ready to have faces,hair, socks, and shoes put on them. Each one can be differ-ent. Use colored pencils or sharply pointed crayons forthis work. For the eyes, just make tiny blue, brown, or gray circlesand fill them in. A tiny half circle drawn in red makes themouth. A thin, light brown line makes the eyebrows. Haircolors may vary as you like. A light pencil line across each leg, slightly above the46Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  42. 42. ankles, will indicate socks. Color the slippers brown, black,red, or green. Now make the backs of the dolls match the fronts byfilling in the hair, socks, and shoes.Dressing the Dolls One dress pattern will do for all the dolls. Trace and transfer it to heavy paper. Cut it out and use it to guide the drawing of each dress. These dresses have a back as well as a front, so lay the pattern on a piece of folded paper. Use a striped or printed paper. Trace around the pattern. With the paper still folded, cut out the dress. You will have two identical pieces for the first doll. 47Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  43. 43. Cut out double dresses for each of the other dolls, usingdifferent colored papers for each. They could be polka-dotted, plaid, plain, or you could draw little designs onthem with pen and ink or colored pencils. When each dollhas a dress (front and back), the pasting begins. Place the string of dolls face down on a clean piece ofpaper. Spread a thin layer of library paste or vegetableglue across the shoulders and waist of the first doll. Smooththe paste so there will be no lumps. Fit one dress piece (layits matching front aside so it wont get mixed up with theothers) to this doll, placing the shoulders of the dress evenwith the shoulders of the doll. When the dress is in theright position, make it stick to the doll by rubbing yourforefinger across the pasted areas. If any paste oozes outat the sides, wipe it off immediately with a piece of cleans-ing tissue. Each of the other dolls has the back of her dress put onin the same way. Turn the string of dolls over and put thefronts on to match the backs. Carefully wipe away anypaste smudges before they dry.Trimming When the dresses are all pasted on and dry, youll wantto add those bits of trimming that give individuality toeach. Look at the illustrations shown with the pattern. ThePeter Pan collar and cuffs may be cut from white writing48Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  44. 44. paper. Belts are very narrow strips cut from dark-coloredpapers. Wider belts may be made from silver or gold orcolored scotch tape. A lace collar may be cut from a pieceof paper-lace doily. Tiny bows and flowers are sometimesfound in magazine illustrations. Cut them out for usehere. Make-believe rickrack braid can be made by cuttingvery narrow strips of colored paper with a pinking shears.Remember to cut double amounts of everything so that thebacks of the dresses will be as attractive as the fronts. Applying paste to these tiny trimming pieces is some-thing of a job. Wrap a very small piece of cotton aroundthe end of a toothpick to use as a paste applicator. Turnthe trimming piece face down and rub paste on the back ofit with the applicator. If the piece should slip as yourepasting it down, thus leaving a smear of paste on the dress,gently rub the smear off with cleansing tissue. If allowedto dry on the dress, it will show up as a white stain, whichis not attractive looking.Stringing When the dolls are all dressed, they may be hung fromthe branches of the Christmas tree or the edge of the man-telpiece for the whole family to enjoy. With a needle, puta small loop of black sewing thread close to the top of thehead of each doll. The tips of the loops may be tied to thetree branches or scotch-taped to the edge of the mantel- 49Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  45. 45. piece. The loops are periodically invisible and the dollswill look as if they are dancing on air.Standing Doll StringIf you want these dancing dolls to stand up by themselves,they will have to be made much stiffer. Make twoidentical strings of dolls and paste them together beforedressing them. This will make them firm enough to standwhen the string has been joined to make a circle.Another way to make them stand is to put “bones” in thedolls. Pipe-stem cleaners are pasted on the backs of oneset of dolls. Pipe-stem cleaners are pasted on the backs ofone set of dolls. A 41/4 in. length of cleaner is pasteddown the middle of the doll from forehead to heels. Two11/2 in. lengths are pasted along the arms. The second setof dolls is then pasted on to cover the bones. The excitingthing about this method is that the arms and legs can bebent into dancing poses. You can make May Pole groupsor square dancing sets that look very natural.The paper dolls made to play with are really the most fun.They can look just exactly as you want them to. You cancopy your own favorite party dress or the prettiest clothesof your friends. You can dream up wonderful designs thatno manufacturer would ever think of. With no expense atall, your paper doll can have as fabulous and extensive awardrobe as the ones that used to go with the real fashiondolls of olden times.50Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  46. 46. The marvelous thing about the dresses you can make foryour own paper dolls is that they can actually look likereal gowns, with folds and pleats and draping just as yourown clothes have. Dressing a doll this way is fascinating.It takes time and requires a lot of planning and patience,but each finished costume is so attractive that you’ll wantto start making another one right away.HOW TO MAKE REAL SCULPTED PAPER DOLLSThe first step is to make the doll itself. Design your own,or use the pattern doll on page 52.Draw the pattern doll on heavy white writing paper.Before cutting it out, paste on paper to lightweightcardboard like the pieces the laundry puts in Father’sshirts. The paste must be very smooth. When the paste isdry, cut out the doll and draw in the features.Do not draw in any hair. Let her stay bald so that all sortsof different hairdos may be designed later to go withindividual costumes.Use the pattern doll for all dress and costume designing.Trace its outline on another paper piece of white paper.Design the dress right over this figure. Start with an easycostume like the jumper and blouse you wear to school.After you have drawn the perky puffed sleeves, snugbodice, and pleated skirt, draw on tabs at the shouldersand at each side of the waist as shown in the small sketchon page 54.51Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  47. 47. Trace this design to make yourown paper doll. By making herbald it is possible to change herhair-dos as frequently as herdresses. Be sure to put hitchingtabs on each hair-do.Brought to you byhttp://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  48. 48. Dressing the Doll Now the really exciting part begins. Make a fresh trac-ing of just the costume on another piece of paper. Leaveout the head, arms, and legs, but be sure to include thetabs. Cut it out. This is the very important foundation pat-tern. The first sketch may now be cut up to give you patternsfor the separate parts of the costume. The second sketch,the foundation pattern, is the part upon which the variousfinal parts are pasted. The idea now is to make the dolls costume look like areal dress actually having pleats, folds, and fullness. Theway to get that effect is to cut the individual parts largerthan the foundation sleeve, bodice, or skirt. Then the edgesof the larger pieces are pasted to the edges of the founda-tion. Because they are larger, the paper bows out in curvesand folds and looks most realistic. Since only the sleeves of the blouse show, that is all ofthe blouse that has to be made. Cut two pieces from asingle sheet of cleansing tissue (it looks just like sheer mus-lin on the doll). Cut each piece 1/4 in. larger than the foun-dation sleeve. Put a narrow line of paste along the bottomof the sleeve on the foundation pattern and another line ofpaste along the armhole. Gather the top and bottom edgesof the tissue between the fingers so it will look as if it hadbeen shirred. Place one shirred edge along the armhole line 53Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  49. 49. Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  50. 50. of paste. Press these edges down firmly. Place the othergathered edge along the paste line at the bottom of thesleeve. Press down. Because the tissue was longer thanthe foundation, it bows out and looks like real puffedsleeves. A very narrow strip of white paper may be pastedalong the bottom of the sleeves to cover the raw edges ofthe tissue. Or use a colored strip to match the jumper.The next step is to make the skirt. Cut ¼ in. longer thanthe skirt length of the pattern, and 7 in. wide. Make alittle box pleat in the center and a number of narrowpleats on either side of it. Rub a line of paste right acrossthe waistline of the foundation and down each side edgeof its skirt, but not across the bottom. Lay the pleatedskirt on the foundation. Press down the top edge to thewaistline of the foundation. Press down each side of theskirt so that it sticks to the sides of the foundation. Onlythe backs of the pleats will stick to the waistline, so puttiny dabs of paste between each fold that has popped upat the waist and press the folds down. Clean off any bitsof paste that may have oozed out.Cut the bodice 1/8 in. wider at sides and bottom than thepattern. Use the same kind of paper you used for the skirt.Cover the back of the bodice with a thin coat of paste. Setthe bodice very carefully on the foundation so that itsarmholes will cover the upper edges of the sleeves andthe bottom will cover the top edge of the skirt. Gently rubit so the paste will take hold. A narrow strip of blackBrought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  51. 51. paper pasted across the waistline will look like a belt, aswell as cover the seam line if it did not turn out smoothly.Trim off the sides of the skirt if they extend too far. Loosen the skirt pleats by slipping your finger underthe bottom of them to make them swing out as your ownskirt does. Gently pull out the sleeve tissue if it has becomeflattened. Be sure that the dress has hitching tabs at shoul-der and waistline to hold the costume on the doll. It is great fun to try your hand at making various hairstyles and hats. Magazine illustrations can be copied ex-actly, or you can just use them to guide your own design-ing. Actual pieces of ribbon, fabric, feathers, and tiny arti-ficial flowers can be pasted on the hats to decorate them. When you are designing your own costumes, alwaysfollow the same procedure; trace the doll, then make yourdesign on this tracing, not forgetting to put on the neces-sary tabs which will hold the dress on the doll. Make afresh tracing from the completed design and cut it out tobe used as the foundation. Study the design before cuttingout the various parts. Plan colors and trimming. Paste theskirt and sleeves on, then the bodice, which should coverthe edges of the sleeves and skirt. Last of all comes thetrimming. By working in this order, your costumes willalways turn out successfully. A good deal of skill and time has gone into the makingof these elaborate dolls. It is a good idea to have a specialbox in which to keep them, so theyll stay fresh and un-damaged. A candy box will do. Cover it with a pretty gift56Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  52. 52. wrapping or wallpaper to show that it holds somethingvery special and valuable. Keep your collection of papersand trimmings in a separate box. Use an elastic bandaround each box to keep it smooth and neat. You can be very proud of these paper dolls. Who cantell but that perhaps some day, years and years from now,these dolls will appear in a museum to delight both chil-dren and grown-ups with their beauty and fine workman-ship? Just in case that might happen, write the dolls name,your name, and the date you made it on the back of eachpiece. 57Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  53. 53. A doll house bride and groom made of paper.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  54. 54. THE DOLL HOUSE FAMILY he most attractive little dolls can be madefor your doll house. Crepe paper, absorbent cotton, andpipe-stem cleaners are the things youll need besides scis-sors, paste, thread, and needle. The charming thing about these dolls is that they can bebent into all sorts of natural poses without any difficultywhatsoever. Their crepe-paper clothes, for the most part,are put together with paste. Only occasionally do youhave to sew anything. Of course, you can use other kindsof paper, too, for costumes and trimmings. As you workalong with them, all sorts of interesting ideas will occur toyou. Sheer fine fabrics can be used on these dolls and,since the dolls are so very small, the tiniest scraps that can-not be used elsewhere will do nicely here.How TO M A K E D O L L H O US E D O LLS Pipe-stem cleaners are used to make a frame or skeletonfor the doll. Six regular-size cleaners are needed for the 59Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  55. 55. full-size dolls; four for the child-size. The method of twist- ing the cleaners is shown in Figures 1,2, and 3 of the dia- gram. One cleaner is looped and twisted to make the head and body. The second cleaner makes the arms and hands. Two cleaners, twisted together, are used for each leg. Fol- low the drawings step by step. When the frame is done, place a small wad of absorbent cotton in the head loop. Then cover the entire head with a very thin layer of cotton and bind it to the neck by wind- ing thread around it tightly. Place small wads in the loops of the hands and feet. Cover the head, hands, and feet with 60Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  56. 56. peach-colored crepe paper. Bind each part at neck, wrists,and ankles with sewing thread. The frame should look likeFigure 4. Pad the shoulders and chest with thin strips of cotton.The shoulder strips should be about 1/2 in. wide and 2 in.long. Lay them across the shoulders, having the ends comedown to the waist. Tie them there with a binding of thread.The chest strip, 1/2 in. wide and 3 in. long, is wrappedaround the body and held on with a binding of thread. Cover the legs and arms with crepe paper cut into strips1/4 in. wide. Starting at the ankles and wrists, bind thestrips spirally up each leg and arm. Tie at the top with sew-ing thread. Cover the body the same way, using a strip 1/2in. wide. The doll should look like Figure 5. The child-size doll is made exactly the same way, butshould be about 11/2 inch shorter than the grown-up doll.The diagram and dress pattern on page 70 will guide you.This basic doll can be made into many characters bymeans of different hairdos and clothes. A favorite pair is a bride and groom. Lets make thebride first.THE BRIDE Water-color pencils are used to draw on the eyes andmouth. Dip the tip of an azure-blue pencil in water, shakeoff the excess, then draw two small circles for the eyes. Fill 61Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  57. 57. in the circles. Don’t press hard, or the pencil tip will tearthe soft paper face. A semi-circle in red will give the bridea pleasant, halfway smiling expression.It is wise to practice using these water-color pencils onpieces of crepe paper before you actually use them on theface. Lay a scrap piece of the paper over a wad of cottonand then try making different kinds of features. When youfeel that you have the knack of it, draw the eyes and mouthon the doll.WigLet’s plan a blond bride. There are two ways of making herhair: with crepe paper according to the pattern shown here,or with strands of fine pale yellow yarn. The crepe-paperwig is easier.Cut pale yellow paper to the size and shape shown. Thecurved edges of it are finely slashed to make it look likehair. Cover the top, sides, and back of the doll’s head witha thin, even coat of library paste. Paste the wig on asshown, molding it to the head. If the bob is too long, trimthe ends carefully with a very sharp scissors.The yarn wig is a bit more difficult to make but it doeslook very natural when done. Cut twelve 21/2 in. lengths ofvery fine yellow wool. You may need more lengths, but62Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  58. 58. twelve is enough to start with. Place a line of Duco cementfrom the forehead straight back across the top of the head.Lay the center of each strand on the line of cement, so thatthe strands touch each other completely. Start at theforehead and continue back to the crown of the head,pressing the strands down against the cement. The ends falldown on either side of the face. Turn the doll around so theback of her head is toward you. There will be a spot on thehead that is still bald. Put a thin coat of cement on this baldspot. Press some more stands of wool straight up andadown on the cement. The end of each new strand musttouch the last strand of top hair.When the cement is dry draw all the strands together at theback of the neck. Tie them with a piece of matching wool,then cut off the ends quite close to the tied part. This makesa little pompon that looks just like a little bun.63Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  59. 59. Gown The bridal gown is one of the most striking costumesyou can make. It can be made of white, ivory, or any palepastel crepe paper. Only five pieces are necessary to makeit: two sleeves and a bodice, and a straight skirt which isshirred at the waistline. In cutting out the various parts, besure that the crinkled grain of the paper runs up and down. The skirt requires a piece of paper 9 in. long and 4 in.wide. Gather the top of the skirt (along the 9-in. edge)with a needle and thread. Pull the thread just tight enoughto fit the waistline of the doll. Tie the gathering threadwith a double knot. Put the skirt on the doll and bind it inplace by winding the thread tightly around the waistline.This wrapping thread goes over the gathers. Tie it se-curely. Paste the back seam of the skirt, lapping one edgeover the other. Hold the doll upright with her feet flat on the table totest the length of the skirt. Trim off the bottom if it is toolong. Stretch the bottom edge of the skirt by gently pull-ing small sections of it sideways. This will make a seriesof small puffs around the bottom which are very pretty. Cut sleeves and bodice according to patterns on page65. The grain or crinkle of the paper must run fromtop to bottom of each piece. Use a needle and thread togather the bottom of each sleeve. Gather the tops betweenthe points marked A and B. The sleeves can be made tolook fuller by gently stretching the center part. Tie the64Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  60. 60. SLEEVE PATTERN 7be doll house brides dress pattern.bottoms of the sleeves to the wrists, wrapping them on likethe top of the skirt. The tops of the sleeves are pasted tothe dolls shoulders. Paste the seams together by lappingone side over the other. The lap should be as narrow aspossible. The front and back of the bodice are identical. Rub athin coat of library paste all over one side of each piece.Carefully fit one piece on the back, smoothing it to removewrinkles and making sure that the piece covers the tops ofthe sleeves and the top of the skirt. Fit the front on in thesame way.Accessories Narrow white satin ribbon may be tied around the waist, finishing it with a bow and streamers at center back. 65Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  61. 61. Tbe doll house grooms suit pattern.Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  62. 62. Fold the ribbon in half, lengthwise, and tie a piece of rib-bon around each wrist; make a double knot and then cutoff the ends. The neckline may be finished either with a little flat col-lar cut from a lace-paper doily or with a tiny lace ruffle.For the latter, cut a strip 1/4 in. wide and 3 in. long. Gatherit to fit the neck. Put it on with the ends meeting at centerback. Tie securely. The nicest kind of veil for the little bride is made fromsilk or nylon tulle or net. A piece 4 in. wide and 6 in. longwill do nicely. Lay it on the head so it will fall to the chestin front and flow gracefully down in back. Hold the veil inplace by pinning it with two very short straight pins stuckright into the head. By slipping a tiny pearl bead on eachpin and sticking a number of them in side by side acrossthe top of the head, you make a pearl coronet which is verybeautiful. Paint silver or white slippers on the bride.T HE G ROOM The groom doll is made exactly like the bride, exceptthat you might want to make his complexion darker. If so,you can cover his face and hands with light tan crepepaper. Also, the shape of his eyes and mouth are madesomewhat different from those on the bride. Study thepicture of the finished pair on page 58 to see the difference.Brown water-color pencil is used. 67Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  63. 63. Suit The pattern for the grooms suit is on page 66. Blackcrepe paper is used for trousers and coat/ white writingpaper for the shirt. Since only the front will show underhis suit, it is cut without a back. Paste the edges of each trouser leg together to maketubes, which are then slipped up onto his legs. Keep theseams on the inner side of the legs. Paste the tops to thebody at the waistline. Paste the shirt on, lapping the bottom of it over the topof the trousers. His collar is a narrow strip cut from shinywhite paper, just long enough to go around his neck. Pasteit on with the ends meeting at center front. Paste on thetiniest snip of black paper to look like a tie. The sleeves are made into tubes and slipped on the arms.Paste the tops of them to the shoulders. The coat is put on last. Rub a thin coat of paste alongthe edges of the armholes, across the top of the back, andacross the top edge of the front shoulders. Start with theback and carefully fit it to the body, smoothing out anywrinkles and lapping the armholes over the edges of thesleeves. Lap the front shoulders over the back. Bend backthe lapels. Paste the coat together in front at the waist. Atiny snip of white paper may be pasted to the left lapel tolook like a carnation. Paint the grooms feet black. Use thesame poster paint to give him hair, unless you want to68Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  64. 64. make a brown wool wig. This is not too hard to do and itcertainly looks handsome when finished."Wig The best yarn to make a wool wig for a man doll, is astrand unraveled from an old piece of knitting. Whenripped out it is nice and curly. Cut the yarn into smalllengths somewhat less than 1/4 in. Put a thin coat of Ducocement all over the head and press the tiny bits of wool onuntil the head is covered with them. Right now theyllmake him look like a Hottentot, but after the cement is dryyou can barber him. Cut the wool off close above the earsand at the back of the head. The top hair should be just abit longer. The bride and groom are now ready for display, andwhat an exceedingly handsome couple they make! TheBrides skirt is stiff enough to allow her to stand withoutsupport. Link the grooms pipe-cleaner arm through hersand he, too, will stand upright.COSTUME CHANGES Both the brides and the grooms clothes can, with a fewchanges, be turned into everyday outfits. 69Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  65. 65. 7he doll house fathers every- day jacket pattern uses tube sleeves like those of the groom. The doll house child takes only a few minutes to make with pipestem cleaners and crepe paper.70 Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomem aking.com
  66. 66. Make the brides dress knee length, of colored paper,add a flat white collar, and it becomes a schoolgirls frock.By making the skirt a bit longer (about halfway down theleg) and not quite so full, it turns into a fine gown for amother doll. For her, a tiny necklace of pearls will be agood finishing touch. A dress made exactly like the origi-nal, only in gray paper and with a wide flat collar of stiffwhite paper added, turns the doll into an enchanting littlePilgrim Maid. Add a black cape to complete the picture. The pattern for the grooms suit can be the basis for anumber of daytime outfits. The trousers are always cut thesame way. The jacket pattern is shown on page 70. Trycutting it from a tweedy looking writing paper and usewith gray or brown crepe-paper trousers. You will have avery fine country outfit. If the man doll is to appear justin slacks and a shirt, cut a duplicate of the shirt front forthe back and cut sleeves of the same paper, using thejacket-sleeve pattern. A narrow black or brown strip ofpaper around the waist will serve as a belt. These easy costume changes transform the dolls intomother and father characters.D OLL H OUSE C HILDREN The child-size dolls are made in the same way but are1 1/2 in. shorter. Cut little one-piece dresses for them. Theyare really too small to wear anything fancy. A nice way to 71Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  67. 67. trim the dresses is to paste very narrow cotton lace aroundneckline and bottoms of sleeves. If the lace you have is toowide, cut it to the width you need. Use cement for pastingit down. Tie a piece of colored yarn around the waist topull in the fullness of the dress. Paint socks and shoes onwith poster paint.P LANNING A D OLL S HOW These tiny dolls are fun to make. They take so littlematerial and are completed so rapidly that making dozensof them for a Doll Show would be a most interesting proj-ect to work on. Why not have a Doll Bee with a group offriends? You could trade materials, trimmings, and ideasand help each other prepare the dolls for the Show. Such a project should be planned in advance. A centralidea or theme is necessary to give the Show importance.Suppose your town is going to celebrate its hundredthanniversary. What could be more exciting than to preparegroups of dolls dressed as Founding Families and theirdescendants? A hundred years of fashions offers all sortsof possibilities for doll costumes. Everyone will co-operateby giving you lots of stories and anecdotes that can beturned into doll group presentations. These dolls are ide-ally suited for this kind of use because, after costumingthem, they can be bent into action poses to suit the theme. If you do plan anything like this, you will want dolls72Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  68. 68. that can stand up by themselves. They can be made to doso by using self-hardening clay to model good supportingfeet for your actors. Make a small oval of the clay about 3/4 in. long, 1/2 in.wide, and 1/4 in. thick. Press this on the table so that thebottom is absolutely flat. Press each doll foot into a claylump, then smooth the sides of the lump up and over the topof the wire ankle. The clay will dry very hard, and then itmay be painted. It is heavy enough to hold the doll uprightwithout other support. The clay feet are certainly notdainty looking, but with the men dolls it doesnt make anydifference, and the skirts of the women dolls will partiallyconceal them. Oddly enough, large feet look rather appeal-ing on doll children. 73Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
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  70. 70. THE RAG DOLL he rag doll belongs to a family noted for itsgreat hardiness, sweet disposition, and comfortable per-sonality. While not as beautiful as the bisque and chinabranches of the family, the rag doll clan possesses bothcharm and an amazingly durable constitution. The term "rag doll" is used to describe any doll that isentirely made of cloth of some kind. One naturally thinksof a rag as being an old, worn, or discarded piece of mate-rial, but this does not apply to all rag dolls. Metropolitanmuseums have collections of rag dolls made (heads, bod-ies, and limbs) of the finest silks and satins and dressed ingorgeous velvets and brocades. Made by artist doll-mak-ers, these rag dolls proudly proclaim the fact that theirbranch of the family has aristocrats as well as commonfolk. Perhaps your museum has one of these beauties. But it is the common everyday rag doll, the lovable,huggable, soft darling for everyday use that is most ap- 75Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  71. 71. 76Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
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  73. 73. pealing to us all. Shes easy to make and easy to dress. Inher own individual way, she is also quite pretty.How TO MAKE A RAG DOLL The drawing of Prudence, a finished rag doll, shows justhow attractive this kind of doll can be. On the precedingtwo pages you will find the pattern for making this doll.The pattern is in two parts to give you a doll which will be8 in. tall. In tracing the pattern, draw the top part first. Thenplace the tracing paper on the second part so that thebottom of the shaded area of the body will just touch thetop of the shaded area of the legs, and finish the tracing. Cut out the pattern and indicate the dotted lines thatappear on the original pattern drawings.Material The best material from which to make a rag doll is astrong, firmly woven cotton that is not too heavy. Muslin,percale, longcloth, or sateen work out very satisfactorily.A half yard will be enough to make several dolls. Ab-sorbent cotton, cotton batting, or wool batting make excel-lent stuffing materials. Soft rags or old silk or nylonstockings are sometimes used for stuffing, but the finaleffect is apt to be bumpy and uneven. 78Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  74. 74. Needle, thread, thimble, and scissors are the tools withwhich the doll is put together. It is possible to sew the dollbody on a sewing machine, but you will be much bettersatisfied with the results from hand sewing, because youcan go around curves and in and out of sharp angles muchmore smoothly. Use tiny back stitches and sew directlyalong the penciled line. Very pale pink or cream-colored material are best forthe doll body. If white is the only thing you have to workwith, you can tint it to look more like skin. Beige or peachtinting dye will produce nice tones. Follow the instructionson the packages. I like to use tea for tinting. Four or fivecups of strong tea will give a light sun-tanned tone that ismost attractive. Wet the material in clear water first, thenwring it out as dry as possible. Pour the hot tea into abowl and submerge the wet material in it. Stir the fabricaround with a spoon and hoist it up and down in the teato make sure that every bit of it is soaked with the tea. Ittakes only a few minutes to get the desired color. Rinse thematerial thoroughly in cold water. Iron the material whileit is slightly damp.Cutting and Stitching Pin the paper pattern to two thicknesses of material inorder to get a front and back at the same time. Tracearound the edges of the pattern with a sharp-pointed soft 79Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  75. 75. A variety of faces to be drawn, painted, or embroidered on the rag doll. Copy, or de- sign your own. Embroidered eyebrows are done with Outline Stitch, which is done by making short, diagonal stitches close to- gether as shown in top needle sketch. Satin Stitch for mouth and eyes are straight stitches set side by side. See lower needle.80 Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  76. 76. pencil. Unpin the pattern. Baste the two pieces of materialtogether with short running stitches, 1/4 in. inside of theoutline. Then do the final stitching directly on the penciledline. Leave a 2-in. opening on one side of the doll in orderto turn it inside out and to put in the stuffing. Rip out thebasting stitches. When the stitching is completed, cut out the doll. Dontcut too close to the stitching, but keep about 1/8 in. awayfrom it. Before turning the doll inside out, make a tinyslash at each side of the neck, under the arms, and betweenthe legs. These slashes make it easier to get a good flat seamon the right side. It is much more difficult than it sounds to turn a dollinside out. Do the legs first, then the arms and head. Theseare then pulled through the side opening. The fabric maybecome wrinkled, but dont worry about that. The stuffingwill smooth out the wrinkles.Face The dolls face should be put on next, because it is mucheasier to do this before the doll is stuffed than afterward.There are several ways in which this can be done: withcrayon, with embroidery stitches, with textile paints, orwith tiny beads. Embroidered features last the longest. They are not hardto do and are very pretty. Crayon and paint are fairly 81Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  77. 77. permanent. Bead features, though extremely gay and at-tractive looking, will break off unless the doll is handledcarefully. In making any face that requires sewing (em-broidery or bead work), be sure that the needle does notgo through and sew the back of the head to the front. Inorder to avoid this, hold the first two fingers of your lefthand inside the head to keep the front and back separatedwhile you are working. Different kinds of faces are shown on page 80. Traceand transfer them to the cloth face, using a sharp-pointedhard pencil. The features are colored in the style youchoose. When embroidering, use outline stitch for the thinline; satin stitch for the eyes and lips. The way to makethese stitches is illustrated with the face drawings. Shortsingle stitches are used for making eyelashes.Stuffing In stuffing the doll, begin with the legs and arms. Tearoff small pieces of cotton or wool and push them down intothe legs. Use the eraser end of a pencil to poke the piecesdown. Keep the stuffing as smooth and firm as possible.When the leg is stuffed to the top (the dotted line shown onthe pattern), sew across from seam to seam. The same kindof seams are needed at the tops of the arms. These seamsmake it possible to move the arms and legs back and forth. Stuff the head three-quarters full. Push a lollipop stick82Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  78. 78. or wooden meat skewer halfway into the head stuffing andhalfway into the chest. This makes the "neck" and willkeep the head from wobbling back and forth as it wouldif it had no support. Fit the rest of the stuffing firmlyaround the stick, filling out the neck and shoulders. Stuffthe body, keeping it smooth and quite firm. When youhave finished stuffing, draw the side opening together andsew with small, closely set stitches. In the drawing, you will see a dotted diamond acrossthe front of each foot. This indicates where a tuck mustbe taken to make the foot bend forward in a natural posi-tion. Take a tiny stitch on the top line, another stitch onthe bottom line and pull the thread tight to draw the linestogether. Do this right across each foot, then knot thethread securely.Wigs Hair for the doll can be made of several different mate-rials. A wig made of wool or cotton jersey, or the leg partof cotton socks, is very nice looking. The pattern on page84 can be worked out for bangs, no bangs, pigtails, longor short bob. If you choose to have bangs, cut the narrowstrip marked A, make fine vertical slashes along the bot-tom, then sew the piece across the top of the head as shownin Figure 1. Cut large wig pattern and place center arrow at center 83Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
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  80. 80. top of forehead. Stitch across front of head, along dotted line,as shown in Figure 2. Lap the fabric back, like Figure 3, andsew down flat. Cut the hair to the desired length and make fine verticalslashings all around. The ends of the jersey wig may becurled by dampening them and rolling them up on straightpins. Secure the rolls with extra pins and allow the fabricto dry before removing them. Trim the bangs. If you want pigtails, cut wig 2 in. longer than pattern.Make six evenly spaced slashes from the bottom of the wigup to the neck. This gives three pieces on each side whichcan be braided. Tie the ends of the braids with little piecesof colored wool to look like hair ribbons. Rug yarn or heavy knitting wool can also be used foreffective-looking hair. Each strand must be sewn on in-dividually. The bottom layer of strands, each 6 in. long,is put on first. (See page 86.) The top layer of 8-in. strandsis sewn from forehead to back of head. Use enough strandsto entirely cover cloth head. Trim to length desired. Leaveit long if you are going to braid it.Underwear Panties and a pretty slip are the first pieces of clothingto make. The patterns for these are on page 88. Use anysoft white cotton such as lawn, nainsook, or batiste. The panties are cut in one piece, from folded material. 85Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  81. 81. SHOE PATTERNLay "fold" edge of pattern along the fold of material andcut out. Hem the legs first, then sew up the side seams andfinish off the top with a narrow hem. This may be done ona sewing machine, but it looks much prettier done by hand.Elastic sewing thread is whipped to the top hem with fairlyloose overcast stitches. When the elastic thread is all theway around the top, pull it a bit to gather in the top of thepanties. Tie the ends of the elastic in a square knot and trimoff the ends. To make the slip, fold the material in half and lay theside of the pattern marked "fold" along the fold of thematerial. Then cut out the first piece. A second piece is86 Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomema king.com
  82. 82. cut the same way. Sew up the side seams of the slip. Makea narrow hem at top of slip and a 1/4-in. hem along thebottom. Whip elastic thread to the top of the slip, just asyou did for the panties. Both the slip and panties will look much more dainty ifyou trim the bottoms with narrow cotton lace. Lay the laceflat on the hem (see page 88), and sew it on with overcaststitches. Now turn the lace down and flatten the sewingwith your fingers.Shoes The pattern for the dolls shoes, on page 86, should betransferred to cardboard, cut out, and used to trace aroundthe edges. Shoes are not difficult to make, but they do re-quire nice tiny even stitches. Each shoe has two pieces: anupper, marked A, and a sole, marked B. Cut two of each.Lay the upper on the sole, matching the Vs. Join themalong the outside edges with closely set overcasting stitches.Lap C over D and sew down flat. Felt, wool jersey, andthin kid from an old pair of gloves are all excellent mate-rials for dolls footwear. They must be sewn with matchingcolored thread. Try the shoes on the doll. If they are a bit longer thanthe feet, stuff out the toes of the shoes with tiny bits ofcotton. Cut two very narrow strips of the shoe material tomake straps. These should be about 1 in. long. Sew themon, having the ends meet at the back top edge of the shoe. 87Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  83. 83. 88Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  84. 84. The straps must be snug around the ankle. If 1 in. is toolong, cut the excess off so theyll fit perfectly.Dress Right now, just in her underwear and slippers, isnt sheone of the most attractive little dolls youve ever had? Youcan tell at this point just what kind of a name to give her.Shall it be Aramantha Susan Peabody or Prudence Cabotor Sue Ellen Pritchard? Lets call her Prudence for thetime being. The dress Prudence is wearing in her portrait on page74 is easily made. As you can see on the pattern (page 90);the bodice and sleeves are cut in one piece. The skirt is astraight piece that is shirred around the top and sewn tothe bodice. My Prudence wears a gown of lavender andwhite striped lawn, trimmed with lavender velvet ribbon.Any soft fine cotton fabric will do very nicely. It couldbe plain colored, or plaid, or checked, or printed with atiny floral design. Ribbon, narrow rickrack braid, bias tape,or lace could be used for trimming. Its such fun to figureout just how youre going to make and trim the dress. Trace the bodice pattern and transfer it to heavy paper.Write the dolls name and the date on the pattern. This isa basic pattern which can be used for any number of differ-ent dresses and fancy costumes, so dont let it get lost. Fold the material in half. Place the pattern on it so thatits top edge meets the fold line of the fabric. Cut it out. 89Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  85. 85. 7he puffed-sleeve bodice is cut according to pattern above. Shirr between the points marked A and B. "Before finishing shirring, try on doll to see that head and arms will go through when bod- ice is done. Sew side seams. 90Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  86. 86. Make the narrowest hem you can around the neckline and the bottom of the sleeves. Now gather the sleeves between the points marked A and B on the diagram. Before knotting the gathering thread, test the shirring at the neck to see if youve allowed enough room to put the bodice on over the dolls head. Test the sleeve .bottoms to see that theyre wide enough to allow the hand and arm to go through them. When these adjustments have been made, knot the thread. Sew the sides together, on the wrong side. Turn the bodice inside out. The skirt measures 16 in. around the bottom and is 4 3/4in. long, including the turnup for the hem. Gather the topand draw in enough to match the measurement around thebottom of the bodice. Be sure to leave 1/4 in. at each sideto seam the skirt together. It is a very good idea to securethe shirring by running a line of machine stitching alongit. If you cannot use a machine, sew a row of small back-.stitches to hold the gathers in place. Seam the side of theskirt. Iron the skirt and press the seam open so it will lieflat. A dolls electric iron is just right for this. Join the bodice to the skirt like this; turn the skirt inside out and the bodice upside down. Slip the bodice inside the skirt until the two edges meet. Sew the two parts together, having the side seam of the skirt meet one side seam of bodice. Use small running stitches, and go around the waistline twice. Knot the thread securely. Turn up 1/2 in. along bottom of skirt and hem with tiny stitches. Iron hem before putting dress on doll. 91Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  87. 87. The waistline of the dress is not quite as snug as youmay think it should be. This was planned on purpose,because it is easier to put the dress on the doll when thewaist is a bit loose. The belt or sash that shell wear canbe put on tight enough to give her the wee waist that looksso very pretty.Neckla ce A necklace of small beads will complete her costume.Choose a color bead that contrasts nicely with the colorof the dress. The necklace can be removable if you make itthe following way: thread one bead and slide it down towithin 2 in. of the end of the thread; tie the thread in adouble knot around this bead, then thread as many morebeads as is necessary to make the necklace the length youwant. Then knot the thread around the last bead and breakit off 2 in. away from the bead. The thread ends can be tiedin a small bow at the back of the neck.C OSTUME C HANGES Charming Prudence can have many more dresses if youuse the basic bodice pattern with different kinds of skirts. Suppose you have a pretty piece of pink chambray youwant to use for a dress with a circular skirt. Cut and finishthe bodice as before. Then lay a bread and butter plate ona single thickness of the fabric. Trace around it and then92Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  88. 88. cut out the circle. Fold the circle in half and in half again.Cut off the point 1/2 in. away from the top fold. Curve thecutting line slightly so that a perfect circle is taken out ofthe center. This is the waistline. Fit it to the bottom of thebodice. If it is too small, trim it just the slightest bit. If toolarge, gather it slightly to fit. The shirring looks best whenplaced at the back. Sew the circle to the bodice. Make a narrow hem aroundthe bottom of the skirt. Three bands of narrow white rick-rack around the bottom of the skirt, and one band aroundthe neckline and sleeve bottoms, will give the dress a fresh,spick-and-span look that is most attractive. A white kidbelt would be pretty, or a piece of the white rickrack tiedaround the waist would finish it nicely.A fairy Princess Gown A party gown or Fairy Princess costume can be madefrom white or pale yellow organdie. Use the same bodicepattern. Cut a circular skirt from a double thickness oforgandie, using a dinner plate as a guide in drawing a per-fect circle. Cut out the waistline just as you did in the pinkchambray. Silver ribbon or silver tinsel make beautifultrimmings for these gowns. String enough small pearls tomake a circle the size of a quarter. Tie the ends together andplace on the dolls head for a little crown. A tiny braceletof pearls can be tied on each wrist. For fancy costumessuch as these, silver painted or white kid slippers look best. 93Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  89. 89. An Everyday Dress A pleated skirt with the same bodice makes a very at-tractive daytime dress. Checked gingham (use only thevery smallest size check) or a small pattern plaid ginghamlooks very well when pleated. Make the bodice as usual. For the skirt, cut a straight piece of material about 4 in.long and 13 in. wide. Make a small box pleat in the center.Make 1/4 in. pleats, side by side, on either side of the cen-ter, so that the top of the skirt measures the same width asthe bottom of the bodice. Then pin the pleats in place. Inthis instance, the skirt will be seamed at the center back.Cut off any excess material. Stitch along the top of theskirt to hold the pleats in place. Put the bodice on andhold the skirt up to it to determine the correct length. Hemthe skirt but do not seam it together. While still unseamed,iron the pleats in place; then sew up the seam. Join the skirtto the bodice as usual. Bias binding tape (it comes already folded for use) canbe sewn around the neckline and bottom of sleeves. A nar-row black kid belt will look well.B ABY R AG D OLL Prudence can be changed into a real baby doll very eas-ily. By covering her head with a mass of short curls and94Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  90. 90. giving her a real baby dress you can make her into a sweet little baby. Six-strand embroidery floss (used with a long-eyed needle) is worked into French knots. Draw the floss all the way through the fabric. Then, holding the needle close to where the floss came out, wind the floss several times around the needle. Insert the needle into the fabric quite 95Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  91. 91. close to where the floss came out. Let the needle tip comeout again a short distance away and draw the threadthrough. These knots should be a good deal looser thanthose used in fine embroidery. Set the knots close togetherso theyll entirely cover the head. The baby dolls dress shows only the top. Make it longenough so that it will cover her feet. Use soft, fine whitematerial. Shirr the sleeves and neckline as shown by thedotted lines on the pattern and trim the edges with narrowlace. You know how to cut and put on a tiny diaper.A D OLL S C LOSET By this time youve thought of several more ways ofworking out dress designs of your own. They dont takelong to make, and theyre such fun to make and use. A good way to keep the dresses fresh is to provide thedoll with her own trunk or wardrobe chest. Use a shoeboxcovered with wallpaper or cretonne for a trunk. To use thebox as a wardrobe, stand it up on its end. Put a pencil ora thin wooden stick inside the box to act as a rod uponwhich to hang the dress hangers. Measure the width of thebox and cut the pencil or stick to fit. Thumb tacks, pushedthrough from the outside, will hold the rod in place. The dime and variety stores have pretty little coloredplastic hangers for small-sized doll dresses. If each dressis kept on its own hanger, it will stay fresh much longer.96Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  92. 92. MODELED RAG DOLLS ometime ago a special kind of doll came to this country from Italy. These dolls were so beautiful that grownups bought them just to look at. They could sit on dressing tables and beds in the most lifelike way. Some of these dolls live in dolls* houses and delight hundreds of little girls who are lucky enough to own them. Made entirely of felt (which means that they are really rag dolls!), they have fat, dimpled arms and legs, and adorable faces. Despite the fact that the heads are made of the same felt as the bodies, the faces are rounded and modeled like those of the bisque dolls. There is a very special manufacturing trick involved in making these faces which the home doll-maker can never duplicate. But the charming roundness of the rest of the doll serves as an inspiration in making a more realistic rag doll. By cutting out the arms, legs, body, and head individu- ally, it is possible to get the realistic shape which is so at- 97Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  93. 93. Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  94. 94. tractive. The head is made from three separate pieces. Itis quite round and even has a cute little snub-nosed profile.How TO M A KE A R EALIS TIC R AG D OLL The patterns necessary for this doll are shown on page100. The arms and legs are cut in "profile/ which resultsin the seams being along the center front and back ofeach leg instead of at the sides. One hardly notices theseseams when the stuffing has been put in. The body shape isvery natural looking. The head pattern calls for two pieces for the front andone piece for the back. The center seam which runs downthe front of the face makes it possible to give the doll areal profile. When firmly stuffed, this seam is hardly vis-ible. Trace and transfer the pattern to heavy paper. Use fine,firmly woven cotton material to make the doll. Pin eachpattern piece to a double thickness of the material. Tracearound the outside edge of the pattern. Remove the pat-tern and baste the two pieces together to keep them fromslipping out of place while the final stitching is being put in. Sew along the pencil outline, either by hand with back-stitches, or on the machine. Cut the piece out about 1/8 in.outside the line of sewing. Turn the piece inside out. Finishthe arms, legs, and body before doing the head. Stuff each section just as firmly as possible, using either 99Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  95. 95. PATTERN FOR BONNIE. 1. BODY: cut two. 2. FACE: cut two. 3. LEGS: cut four. 4. ARMS: cut four. 5. F OOT BOTTOM : cut two. 6. BACK OF HEAD: cut one.100Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  96. 96. absorbent cotton or wool batting. The drawings show how to place the arms and legs against the body. Turn in top edges of the arms and legs and hem them to the body. Set the stitches close together to make a strong seam. Secure the end of the sewing so that there is no possible danger of it starting to rip out. Sew the two front pieces of the head together with the tiniest of backstitches. This line of sewing must be perfectly straight and even. When the seam is finished, turn the piece inside out 101Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com
  97. 97. The pattern for the head shows exactly where to placethe eyes and mouth. Punch pinholes along the lines show-ing the eyes and mouth on the pattern. A sharp-pointedpencil tip will just fit into each hole. Lay the face piece flaton the table and fit the paper pattern on it so the edge ofthe pattern exactly matches the seam line of the face. Putthe pencil point into each pinhole and make a dot on thecloth. These dots will guide you in embroidering or paint-ing the features. The face should be put on before the frontof the face is joined to the back head piece.Head Sew the face and back of head together, leaving the bot-tom open for stuffing. If the back circle is a little too large,shirr the edge slightly to make it fit. Turn it right side out.Roll a tiny bit of cotton into a ball and place it in the noseto accentuate it. Place a large flat piece of cotton inside andagainst the face. Stuff the rest of the head tightly andsmoothly. Push a 2-in. piece of lollipop stick halfway up into thehead, and halfway down into the chest. This will keep thehead from wobbling. When the head is sitting firmly onthe shoulders (and right in the middle), sew the bottomof the neck to the body. The edge of the fabric must beturned in, of course, before sewing. Use thread that102Brought to you by http://www.oldfashionedhomemaking.com

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