Lesson 6 brain structures involved in memory function 2013

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Lesson 6 brain structures involved in memory function 2013

  1. 1. Lesson 6 - Brain structures involved in Memory FunctionSaturday, 30 March 13
  2. 2. From last lesson...... Long-term potentiation is best described as A. the long-lasting strengthening of synaptic connections resulting in enhanced functioning of neurons. B. habituation in Aplysia. C. the formation of a long-term memory. D. the potential to form a long-term memory.Saturday, 30 March 13
  3. 3. Long-term potentiation is best described as A. the long-lasting strengthening of synaptic connections resulting in enhanced functioning of neurons. B. habituation in Aplysia. C. the formation of a long-term memory D. the potential to form a long-term memory.Saturday, 30 March 13
  4. 4. Todays Lesson.......Outcomes (What you need to know and be able to do) • Explain the role of the temporal lobe including the hippocampus and the amygdala   • Explain the consolidation theory • Explain the conditions required for consolidation to be effective Saturday, 30 March 13
  5. 5. The HippocampusSaturday, 30 March 13
  6. 6. The Case of H.MSaturday, 30 March 13
  7. 7. The case of H.M provides evidence that: •the hippocampus and medial temporal lobe are involved in the formation of new long-term memories, but they are not storage sites for established long-term memories •the hippocampal area of the temporal lobe has an important role in formation or encoding of new declarative explicit memories (semantic and episodic) but not in the formation or retrieval of implicit procedural memories •that LTM involves distinctive, or relatively ‘independent’, storage and retrieval processes. Damage to this area does not seem to seriously affect retrieval of procedural memories, but formation and retrieval of declarative memories are affected.Saturday, 30 March 13
  8. 8. The AmygdalaSaturday, 30 March 13
  9. 9. The AmygdalaThe amygdala regulates emotions such as fear and aggression andplays a more general role in the formation of emotional memory. The amygdala also has an important role because the emotions it regulates enhance the memorability of an event which is stated as declarative memory. Though to be essential in fear conditioningSaturday, 30 March 13
  10. 10. Consolidation Theory Consolidation theory proposes that: Physical changes occur in the neurons following learning to consolidate the new information in LTM. Consolidation is when memories become solid (firm and fixed) A period of time following transfer of information from STM to LTM is required for changes in the brain neurons to occur, e.g. formation and strengthening of neural connections. Disruption of the consolidation process (e.g. due to head injury) can affect recall of information learned or experienced up to 30min prior to the disruption. Indicating consolidation takes about 30minSaturday, 30 March 13
  11. 11. Think of an a n alogy f or the ‘Conso lidation Theory ’Saturday, 30 March 13

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