Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 16

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Apocalypse of Ice Chapter 16

  1. 1. Previously
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:

  2. 2. “Hello,”
the
newcomer
said.

“Will
Stark?”
“Yes,”
Will
said.

“What’s
your
name?”
“India
VeBnari.”

They
shook
hands.

“I’m
an
aDorney.”

  3. 3. Spencer
looked
at
his
cards
and
smiled.

“I’ll
also
see
if
I
can
introduce
you
to
my
grandson,
Teagan.

He’s
been
saying
he’d
like
to
meet
you
before
this
whole
business
started.”

  4. 4. “So,
you’re
asking
me
to
break
Will
out?”
“PreDy
much.

You
and
anyone
else
we
can
get.”

Arthur
paused.

“Do
you
think
it
could
work?”

  5. 5. “You’ll
need
to
hide,”
one
of
the
twins
explained
to
Will.


“And
nobody’s
beDer
at
finding
a
place
to
hide
than
the
simselves,”
the
other
twin
said.

  6. 6. “No.”

Will
shook
his
head.

“I
am
not
going
back
to
college.”

  7. 7. “You
see
the
way
you’re
refusing?”
Lily
asked.

“That’s
how
we
know
Piper
will
never
look
for
you
there.”
“Those
were
the
worst
years
of
my
life.

Except
for—“
Really,
which
was
worse?

Life
in
a
windowless,
floor‐less
box
without
anything
he
needed,
or
Piper?

  8. 8. Will
looked
at
himself
in
the
bathroom
mirror.

Lily
had
definitely
done
a
good
job
assembling
his
disguise.

He
sBll
had
the
same
face,
but
they
had
changed
everything
about
him
that
they
could
feasibly
change
without
the
assistance
of
a
creepy‐sounding
device
called
a
plasBc
surgery
machine.


  9. 9. “Her
name
is
Nymeria,”
he
heard
De
say
as
if
she
spoke
through
a
fog.

“She’s
the
reason
I’m
living
here
now.

The
simself
house…Bme
doesn’t
move
the
same
way
when
you’re
there.

It’s
not
good
for
a
child.

And
Spencer
didn’t
want
me
to
be
alone.”
“He’ll
be
a
beDer
father
than
me,”
Will
said.
He
sobbed
again,
fully
understanding
everything
Piper
had
taken
from
him.



  10. 10. This
wasn’t
the
first
Bme
that
Meg
had
seen
a
vision
like
this.

Occasionally,
the
tangible
world
would
drop
out
from
around
her,
giving
way
to
a
jumble
of
images
that
flashed
by
in
seconds.

Almost
all
of
them
seemed
to
have
something
to
do
with
Meg
and
her
family,
but
beyond
that,
she
didn’t
always
understand
the
visions.

She
also
hadn’t
consciously
realized
that
they
would
stop
her
from
hearing
in
addiBon
to
seeing.
It
didn’t
maDer.

She
had
seen
her
daddy,
and
he
was
back
home
with
them!

  11. 11. Considering
that
it
looked
like
they
were
preparing
to
kick
down
the
door,
Sabriel
opened
it.
“We
have
a
warrant—“
Kevin
started
to
say.
“Didn’t
I
just
tell
you
that
the
only
way
you’re
searching
this
place
is
over
my
dead
body?”

  12. 12. “—to
arrest
Will
Stark
and
to
arrest
anyone
who
may
be
harboring
him,”
Ellen
conBnued.

“And
in
case
you
were
thinking
about
going
over
our
heads
again,
we
have
been
given
all
authority
from
the
Law
to
conduct
this
search
and
to
take
anyone
who
obstructs
it
into
custody.”


  13. 13. Jan
had
discovered
one
of
the
listening
devices
in
each
room,
even
in
the
bathrooms.

The
searchers
hadn’t
been
very
creaBve
about
hiding
them.

In
every
room
with
a
bedroom,
they
were
under
beds.

In
the
bathrooms,
the
devices
lurked
behind
toilets.

In
each
of
the
other
rooms,
the
searchers
had
put
them
into
drawers.
One
by
one,
Jan
disabled
them.

  14. 14. “Are
they
all
turned
off?”
Sabriel
asked
her
over
breakfast
a]er
Gemma
and
Meg
had
gone
to
school.
Jan
nodded.
“Good.

Because
it’s
Bme
for
us
to
have
a
coup
of
our
own.”

  15. 15. Arthur
smiled.

“I
don’t
know
how
long
I’ve
been
waiBng
for
you
to
say
that.”
“We
have
to
stop
trying
to
work
with
a
system
bound
to
work
against
us,”
Sabriel
explained.

“Uncle
Brandon
didn’t
try
to
work
with
the
old
order.

He
wrote
a
whole
new
code
of
laws
and
told
everyone,
‘this
is
how
it’s
going
to
be
from
now
on.’

We
need
to
do
the
same
thing.”

  16. 16. “Ursula
couldn’t
come
today
because
they’re
watching
the
house,”
Teagan
reported,
“but
she
says
to
make
Piper
wish
he’d
never
been
born
and
that
she
hopes
his
head
is
exploding
already.”
Arthur
smiled
at
her
message.

“Is
she
all
right?”
“Fine.

Being
in
hiding
can’t
knock
her
down.”

  17. 17. To
distract
Piper
on
the
day
that
Ferd
and
Mag
helped
Will
escape,
Ursula
had
walked
into
Piper’s
empty
office
and
declared
herself
the
Law.

Piper
responded
by
charging
Ursula
with
being
an
accomplice
to
criminal
escape
and
sending
her
to
the
local
jail.

Of
course,
she
didn’t
stay
there
for
very
long,
because
Ferd
and
Mag
also
helped
her
escape,
but
she
also
had
to
hide.


  18. 18. “I’m
surprised
it
took
them
this
liMle
Nme
to
realize
they
weren’t
picking
anything
up
on
the
microphones,”
Sabriel
said.

“Jan
disabled
them...someNme
early
this
morning?

And
then
at
noon,
Ellen
Bolton’s
standing
on
the
corner
staring
at
the
house.”
“Just
in
Nme
to
see
who
you
were
going
to
call
when
the
phones
went
up,”
Indy
pointed
out.

  19. 19. Sabriel
considered
potenNal
trouble,
then
shook
her
head.

“It’s
Tuesday.

Nothing’s
suspicious
about
large
numbers
of
people
showing
up
on
Tuesdays.

Everyone
has
their
friends
over
whenever
it’s
possible.”

“But
they
are
going
to
noBce
if
we
keep
coming
around
here
all
the
Bme.

So
we’d
beDer
do
what
we
need
to
do
today,
if
it’s
possible.”

  20. 20. 
The
six
of
them
worked
in
near‐silence
for
the
next
fiVeen
minutes,
reading
over
the
document
and
occasionally
making
marks
on
it.
“How’s
the
play
coming
along?”
Teagan
asked
Arthur.
“PreMy
well.

I’ve
got
one
of
the
supporNng
roles,
so
I’m
sNll
working
my
way
up.

Sabriel’s
doing
beMer,
though.

She
got
named
Most
Valuable
Player
on
her
team.”

  21. 21. “SNll
nowhere
near
where
I
should
be,
though.”
She
crossed
through
a
sentence
on
her
page.
“That
under
the
criminal
law,
we
presume
that
all
arrested
are
innocent
of
the
crimes
charged
unBl
an
officer
of
the
Law
proves
them
guilty.

That
needs
to
be
rewriMen.

Who
wrote
that
pack
of
gibberish?”
“That
was
you,”
Arthur
said.

  22. 22. She
looked
up,
surprised.

“Me?

No
way.

That
sounds
ridiculous.”
“Well,
it
wasn’t
me.”
“Maybe
it
was
Uncle
Brandon
and
one
of
us
just
transcribed
it
without
thinking.”

  23. 23. “Or
maybe
you
always
wanted
to
write
like
you
were
born
in
another
century,”
Mag
joked.

“It
looks
like
you
haven’t
started
capitalizing
random
leMers
or
replacing
your
s’s
with
f’s,
though,”
Ferd
conNnued.

“That’s
good.”

  24. 24. “The
line
does
need
to
stay
in,
though,”
Sabriel
said.

“Just
as
something
that
makes
sense.


Innocence
unNl
proven
guilty
was
always
important.

It
seemed
to
have
gone
missing
when
the
goons
arrested
Will.”


  25. 25. “I
like
this
part,”
Teagan
said.

He
cleared
his
throat.
“The
Law
will
be
appointed
by
the
previous
Law
and
is
subject
to
approval
by
a
majority
vote
of
the
people
of
Winterfell.

Between
one
and
three
individuals
can
serve
as
Law
simultaneously.

The
Law
will
serve
for
life,
unless
removed
by
majority
vote.”
“Especially
the
part
about
how
you
stop
being
the
Law,”
Mag
said.
“Yeah.

That’s
the
whole
reason
why
you’re
doing
this.”

  26. 26. “What
is
the
reason
you’re
doing
this?”
Indy
asked.


“To
get
rid
of
Piper,
obviously,”
Sabriel
said.

  27. 27. Indy
paused
before
responding.

“I
get
that.

But
you’re
trying
to
make
people
follow
you,
and
they
might
not
follow
you
just
for
that.

Piper
holds
onto
people
not
just
because
of
apathy,
but
because
he
has
a
theme
that
hooks
them
in:
Even
if
you’re
not
a
Stark,
you
have
a
part
to
play
moving
forward
from
the
Apocalypse.

We
need
a
theme,
too.”


“What
do
you
mean
by
‘theme?’”
“Something
that
tells
people
why
they
should
care
about
what
you’re
wriNng.

One
sentence,
maybe
just
one
phrase
or
word,
that
they
remember
when
they’ve
forgoMen
just
what
this
document
says.”

  28. 28. “Free
Will,”
Arthur
said.

“But
that
doesn’t
mean
anything
to
anyone
but
us.”
“Hey,
it
does
to
us!”
Ferd
protested.

  29. 29. “Because
we’re
beMer,”
Sabriel
said.
“Why?”
Indy
asked
her.
“For
starters,
we’re
not
a
bunch
of
corrupt,
twisty,
sons
of—"
“That’s
not
going
to
help.

They
should
know
what
we’re
not,
but
they
don’t
know
what
we
do
stand
for.”

  30. 30. Upstairs,
Lyra
started
crying.


Sabriel
rolled
her
eyes.

“This
is
why
I
always
hated
wriNng.

And
with
Lyra
hollering—isn’t
Jan
supposed
to
be
looking
aVer
the
kids?”
“Their
sleep
schedules
are
all
ruined,”
Arthur
said.

“She
probably
just
put
Lirael
to
bed.”
“These
two
are
going
to
grow
up
and
start
sleeping
at
night
like
the
rest
of
us,
right?

SomeNmes
I
wonder.

Okay.

We
need
to
focus.”

  31. 31. The
kids
also
took
advantage
of
the
phones
being
up.

Meg
went
inside
to
call
ValenNne
while
Gemma
stayed
outside
with
Kay
Morgan,
who
Meg
had
brought
home
from
school.

  32. 32. She
tried
talking
to
him,
but
he
acted
nervous.
“What’s
the
maMer?

Do
I
scare
you?”

Gemma
decided
it’d
be
kind
of
fun
if
she
could
scare
someone.

“No,”
he
lied.

“I—I
don’t
have
enough
body
points
to
be
here.

My
mum
says
I’m
going
to
get
aMacked
by
bad
guys
and
I
won’t
be
able
to
fight
them
unNl
I
have
ten
body
points.”
“That’s
stupid,”
Gemma
told
him.

“You
don’t
need
body
points
to
fight
real
bad
guys.”

She
leV
out
the
part
where
she
didn’t
know
how
to
fight
real
bad
guys.


  33. 33. Kay
crossed
his
arms.

“Did
you
just
call
my
mother
stupid?”
“Yeah.

Has
she
even
seen
a
real
bad
guy?”
“My
mother’s
way
smarter
than
you!

You’re
just
a
baby!”

  34. 34. “You
don’t
want
her
to
get
any
older,”
Meg
informed
ValenNne.

“My
liMle
sisters
were
quiet
when
they
were
babies,
but
now
they
cry
all
the
Nme
and
Mom
has
to
teach
them
to
walk
and
stuff.

And
Aunt
and
Uncle
are
always
busy.”
“Well,
she’s
gebng
older
today,
and
I
have
to
be
at
her
birthday
party.”
“A
birthday
party!

That
means
cake!

Will
you
bring
me
some?”



  35. 35. “Maybe.

Depends
on
whether
Mom
manages
to
invite
anyone
else
to
eat
all
of
it.”
“But
I
brought
cake
for
you
yesterday.”
Meg
scratched
her
head.

“That’s
not
fair.”
“You
had
two
cakes.

That’s
twice
as
much
cake,”
ValenNne
said,
demonstraNng
her
knowledge
of
the
lower
end
of
the
mulNplicaNon
table.

“It’s
easier
for
you
to
bring
me
cake.”
“But
if
there’s
less
cake,
then
it
means
you’re
a
beMer
friend
if
you
save
a
piece
for
me.”

  36. 36. “I’m
not
a
baby!”

they
heard
Gemma
yelling
at
Kay.
Meg
thought
fast.

She
quickly
formed
a
snowball,
took
aim,
and
threw.

It
hit
Gemma
on
the
back.

  37. 37. “Come
and
get
me!”

Meg
ran.

Gemma
and
Kay
followed,
but
ValenNne
stopped
to
start
on
a
stash
of
snowballs.


  38. 38. They
didn’t
have
any
teams
at
first,
but
Kay
decided
he
wanted
to
be
on
ValenNne’s
team
because
she
had
more
snowballs.

Then
Gemma
decided
to
be
on
their
team
because
Meg
was
too
nice
to
be
any
good
in
a
fight.

Kay
immediately
switched
to
Meg’s
team
because
he
sNll
hadn’t
forgiven
Gemma
for
insulNng
his
mom.


  39. 39. It
was
only
a
maMer
of
Nme
before
one
of
the
snowballs
accidentally‐on
purpose
hit
Ellen.
“Hey!”
She
turned
around,
grimacing.

“Which
one
of
you
did
that?”

  40. 40. They
stood
silently
for
a
while.

Then
ValenNne
pointed
at
Kay.

Kay
pointed
at
Gemma.
Gemma
pointed
at
Meg.
Meg
realized
she
didn’t
have
anyone
leV
to
point
at.


  41. 41. “I
don’t
know
who
did
it,”
she
said,
“but
it
wasn’t
me.

I
was
making
more
snowballs.”
“One
of
you
must
have
done
it.”

Ellen
looked
at
the
four
kids,
then
focused
on
ValenNne
and
Kay.

“What
are
your
names?”
“I’m
CarloMa,”
ValenNne
told
her.

“What’s
yours?”
“El—that’s
not—“

  42. 42. “Why
are
you
here?”

“It’s
about
their
father.”

Ellen
gestured
in
Gemma
and
Meg’s
direcNon.
“Then
why
do
you
care
if
one
of
us
threw
a
snowball
at
you?”

ValenNne’s
eyes
got
very
big.

“And
it
wasn’t
me.”

  43. 43. “Because
I
am
an
officer
of
the
Law,”
Ellen
told
them,
“and
I
deserve
your
respect.”

“No—ow,”
Gemma
complained
as
Meg
stepped
on
her
foot.

  44. 44. “I
thought
throwing
snowballs
wasn’t
a
crime,”
ValenNne
said.
“It’s
not.”

But
she
wanted
it
to
be.

“Why
don’t
the
two
of
you
just
go
home
to
your
parents.

And
as
for
you
two—“
Ellen
looked
at
Gemma
and
Meg.

  45. 45. “She
said
to
tell
you
that
we
need
to
learn
proper
respect
for
law,”
Meg
reported.
“And
some
other
useless—“
Gemma
began.
“Oh,
and
that
we
might
become
good
ciN—ci—a
big
word—“
“Stop
interrupNng
me,
Meg!”
“Sorry.”

  46. 46. Jan
paced
back
and
forth.

“You
need
to
be
more
careful
when
officers
are
watching
you.

Even
when
you
can’t
see
them
watching
you,
you
need
to
be
more
careful.”
“When
are
we
going
to
be
safe?”
Meg
asked.
“When
your
daddy
comes
home.”

It
was
easier
than
saying
she
didn’t
know.

  47. 47. Jan
paced
back
and
forth.

“You
need
to
be
more
careful
when
officers
are
watching
you.

Even
when
you
can’t
see
them
watching
“And
when’s
that
going
to
be?”
Gemma
scoffed.

“You
keep
saying
he’s
going
to
come
home.

I
don’t
see
him.”
“But
you
sNll
have
to
be
careful!”
Jan
looked
at
Meg
for
support,
but
saw
her
other
daughter
staring
into
space
again.

“Meg?

Are
you
even
listening
to
me?”


  48. 48. “You
threw
the
snowball?”
Meg
asked.
“Yeah,
I
did.

And
I’m
not
sorry.”
Gemma
threw
up
her
arms
as
if
to
ask
what
else
she
was
supposed
to
do.
“Then
why
did
you
point
at
me
when
that
woman
asked
who
threw
it?”


  49. 49. “Because
it’s
none
of
her
business
who
threw
it
at
her
ugly
ass!”
“Gemma!

Language!”

“Aunt
Sabriel
says
worse.”


  50. 50. “Just
go
upstairs
and
do
your
homework,”
Jan
told
the
kids.

She
shook
her
head
once
they
had
disappeared.

Gemma’s
mouth
was
gebng
worse
and
worse,
and
Meg
just
plain
unnerved
her.

Were
the
toddlers
going
to
grow
up
to
be
any
beMer?

Right
now,
it
didn’t
seem
like
it.


  51. 51. Will
did
look
older
than
the
other
students,
but
not
old
enough
to
turn
any
heads.

Times
were
sNll
hard.
People
didn’t
always
leave
for
college
when
they
were
supposed
to.

They
didn’t
always
return
from
college
when
they
were
supposed
to,
either.


  52. 52. Lily
had
set
Will
up
in
a
mostly
blue
one‐story
house
on
the
edge
of
campus
with
all
the
necessary
furniture
and
not
much
else.

There
were
two
single
beds,
so
she
must
have
given
Will
a
roommate.

He
wanted
to
trust
Lily’s
judgment,
but
couldn’t
do
it
completely.

Just
one
roommate
would
be
enough
to
give
him
away
if
it
was
the
wrong
one.


  53. 53. Will
looked
around
again
to
check
that
no
one
had
followed
him.

He
had
locked
the
door,
but
locks
didn’t
always
protect
you.

Maybe
they
had
decided
to
wait
unNl
he
felt
safe
to
spring
out
of
the
shadows
and
haul
him
back
to
Winterfell.

No,
the
house
pracNcally
sparkled.

No
one
had
set
forth
in
it
before
Will,
unless
they
hid
their
tracks‐‐


  54. 54. The
doorbell
rang.

Will
jumped.

He
realized
he
should
probably
answer
it.

But
what
if
Piper’s
henchmen
had
finally
come
for
him?

He
needed
to
calm
down.

He
could
look
out
the
window
to
check
who
had
come
to
his
door.

But
if
you
could
see
someone,
then
that
person
could
see
you.
Calm
down,
he
told
himself.

No
one
has
recognized
you
except
for
the
people
who
you
want
to.

But
they
always
figure
it
out.

And
who
can
see
past
the
disguise
beMer
than
the
one
who
stared
you
in
the
face
for
two
whole
days?

  55. 55. The
doorbell
rang
again.
Will
looked
out
the
window.

Short
red
hair
and
a
yellow
jacket.

No
one
he
recognized
as
working
for
Piper.

Just
because
he
didn’t
recognize—
No.

Lily
wouldn’t
send
him
someone
who
was
going
to
betray
him.

Not
intenNonally.

  56. 56. Enough.

Will
made
himself
open
up
the
door.

“Are
you—my
roommate?”


“I
guess
so.”

The
redhead
extended
his
hand.

“Sullivan
Livingston.”
“Sean
Cooper.”

He
had
pracNced
that
in
the
mirror.

Now
what?

“Er,
come
in.”

  57. 57. “Thanks.”

Sullivan
took
off
his
coat
and
changed
into
a
yellow
llama
top.

Will
knew
he
had
seen
this
guy
before.

So
he
must
be
okay,
right?

“Do
I
know
you?”
“I
don’t
know,”
Will
answered.

“Probably
not.

I
just
got
here.”

“What’s
your
major?”

  58. 58. “Physics.”

When
he
arrived,
Will
decided
that
he
would
use
college
to
learn
the
things
he
hadn’t
managed
to
pick
up
the
first
Nme
around.

A
beMer
understanding
of
electricity
would
help
him
work
through
the
problem
of
the
phone
lines.

“Yours?”
“Drama,”
Sullivan
told
him.
“So
you
want
to
be
an
actor?”

  59. 59. Sullivan
shook
his
head.

“That’s
my
fiancé’s
department.

I
thought
I
wanted
to
do
that,
but
I
discovered
I’d
rather
learn
to
cook.

Haven’t
changed
majors,
though.

My
advisor
said
I
sNll
have
to
know
how
to
market
myself
if
I’m
going
to
be
a
celebrity
chef.”
It
was
a
good
thing
that
Sullivan
had
kept
talking.

Will
had
been
about
to
say,
Yeah,
my
brother’s
an
actor.
Wait.



  60. 60. Will
took
a
closer
look
at
Sullivan.

Sullivan.

Fiance
who
was
an
actor.

Of
course.

Of
all
the
students
at
this
university,
Lily
had
chosen
Will’s
future
brother‐in‐law
to
be
his
roommate.


Maybe
everything
was
going
to
be
okay.

  61. 61. “Four
feet,
five
and
a
half
inches.”

Arthur
smiled.

“You’re
going
to
be
tall!”
Meg
frowned.

“How
tall
is
Daddy?”
“Five
foot
nine,
I
think.

A
liMle
taller
than
me.”


  62. 62. “So
I
have…”
Meg
tried
to
work
out
the
math
and
figure
out
how
much
shorter
she
had
been
than
her
dad
in
her
vision.

“About
a
foot
to
go.

Maybe
more.

Can’t
I
grow
faster?”
Arthur
shook
his
head.

“It’s
not
good
for
you
to
grow
too
fast.

Once
you’re
about
fourteen
or
so,
you’ll
probably
be
as
tall
as
you
want
to
be.”
“But
I
want
to
be
tall
now
so
Daddy
will
come
back.”

  63. 63. Arthur
changed
the
subject:
“Does
everything
that
you
see
in
the
future
happen?”
“I
don’t
know
yet.

There
hasn’t
been
Nme.

But
I
know
it
will.”
“So—“
He
stared.
“I’m
a
kid
now.

I
can’t
tell
you
if
something
is
going
to
happen
if
I’ve
seen
it
happening
when
I’m
a
teenager.

But
I
just
know
it’s
going
to
happen.”

  64. 64. “Okay.”

Arthur
didn’t
know
any
more
about
raising
a
kid
with
special
powers
than
Jan
did,
but
it
wasn’t
any
weirder
than
people
coming
back
from
the
dead
when
you
stopped
and
thought
about
it.

As
for
Sabriel,
she
just
wanted
to
know
if
Meg
ever
saw
anything
that
would
help
them
beat
Piper.


  65. 65. “I
think
I
saw
Daddy
today,”
Meg
mused.

“But
I
wasn’t
sure.”

“Was
it
happening
now?”
“Yeah.”
“If
it
is
him,
we
can’t
know
where
he
is,
Meg,”
Arthur
reminded
her.

“Otherwise
the
authoriNes
might
find
out
from
us.”

  66. 66. Meg
slumped.

“Okay.”
“TesBng.

TesBng.

Is
this
on?”

they
heard
Gemma
say
from
downstairs.
“It
shouldn’t
be
on,”
Meg
complained.

“It’s
6
am.”

  67. 67. “It’s
not
fair,”
Gemma
proclaimed.

“Nobody
pays
aMenNon
to
me.

Aunt
Sabriel’s
always
at
the
computer,
and
she
says
it’s
important
and
she
can’t
take
a
break.


Whenever
Lyra
and
Lirael
cry,
one
of
the
grownups
comes
running,
but
they
don’t
care
if
I
want
to
play!


“But
they
all
like
Meg!

They
all
come
running
when
she
wants
someone
to
measure
her
again,
like
she’s
grown
a
foot
in
the
last
day,
because
she
thinks
Daddy’s
going
to
come
home
tomorrow
because
of
her
stupid
visions.”

Gemma
took
a
deep
breath,
then
shouted,
“DADDY’S
NOT
COMING
HOME!

STOP
LYING!”



  68. 68. Arthur
shook
his
head.

“I’ll
go
talk
to
her.”
“It’s
okay,”
Meg
said,
trying
to
keep
the
frown
off
her
face.

“I
knew
she
didn’t
like
me.”
Arthur
was
about
to
say
something
about
how
siblings
should
get
along.

Then
he
remembered
the
way
Sabriel
used
to
fight
with
Will.

“She’s
doing
this
because
she
wants
aMenNon.

I’ll
go
talk
to
her.”

  69. 69. “It’s
you?”
Gemma
asked
Arthur.

“I
thought
someone
was
going
to
come
yell
at
me.”


“I
wasn’t
going
to
yell
at
you,”
Arthur
said.
“Yeah,
because
you
can’t
yell
at
anybody.”

  70. 70. “But
I
was
going
to
ask
you
to
turn
the
microphone
off,”
Arthur
conNnued.

“You
were
supposed
to
hear
me.”
Gemma
crossed
her
arms
again.

Doing
that
made
you
look
tough.
“What
do
you
want?”
her
uncle
asked.

  71. 71. Gemma
could
have
said
so
many
things.

She
wanted
to
be
queen
of
Winterfell,
so
everyone
would
listen
to
her
and
pay
aMenNon
to
her
and
have
to
do
what
she
said.

She
wanted
to
not
have
sisters.

She
wanted
to
be
a
sports
star
like
Aunt
Sabriel.

She
wanted
everyone
to
be
telling
the
truth
when
they
said
her
dad
was
coming
home.
“I
want
you
to
tell
me
a
story,”
she
said.

“A
true
story.

Not
one
of
those
once
upon
a
Nme
stories.”
“Okay,”
Arthur
said.

He
sat
down
next
to
the
podium.
“And
you
have
to
finish
it.”

Gemma
sat
down.

  72. 72. Arthur
thought
about
what
story
to
tell.

“Your
aunt
wanted
to
be
the
heir
of
this
family,”
he
began.
“What’s
an
heir?”
“The
leader
of
the
family.”
“But
Aunt
Sabriel
is
the
leader
of
the
family.”

  73. 73. Gemma
had
a
point.

“The
heir
is
also
the
one
who
gets
married
and
has
kids.”

This
might
not
be
a
good
Nme
to
talk
to
Gemma
about
moving
out.
“Oh.

So…Daddy
was
the
heir?”
“He
sNll
is
the
heir.”

  74. 74. Gemma
frowned.

“I
said,
no
once
upon
a
Nme
stories.”
“But
he
is,”
Arthur
said.

“You
don’t
stop
being
heir.

Once
you
have
it,
you
keep
it
unNl
you
give
it
to
one
of
your
kids.”

  75. 75. “But
he’s
not
here
to
be
heir.”

Gemma
got
up.

“This
story’s
stupid.

I’m
going
to
eat
breakfast.”
Arthur
watched
her
go.

He
had
thought
he
was
finally
gebng
through
to
Gemma,
but
he’d
hit
a
dead
end
again
when
it
all
turned
back
to
Will
being
away.

It
all
turned
back
to
Will
being
away
in
the
end.



  76. 76. Arthur
stared
at
the
computer.

“It
all
turns
back
to
Will…”
he
repeated,
trying
to
vocalize
the
idea.
Then,
he
sat
down
and
started
to
write.
To
the
people
of
Winterfell.

Your
freedom
is
at
risk.

Your
families
are
at
risk….



  77. 77. “Natalie!”
Silence.

Where
was—
Right.

Piper
had
fired
her.

Of
course
he
had
fired
her,
he
told
himself,
quashing
the
voice
that
said
you
just
got
rid
of
her
because
she
was
the
bearer
of
bad
news.

She
had
let
Ursula
Fitzhugh
take
her
in
and
let
Will
escape,
aVer
all.

Someone
had
to
be
punished.





  78. 78. Now
Piper
needed
a
new
assistant.

He
had
too
much
work
to
do
on
his
own
and
too
few
he
could
trust
the
work
to.

Lucia
needed
to
stay
where
she
was
as
the
new
EducaNon
Minister.

Piper
might
have
a
beMer‐qualified
media
person
in
Edward
Grey,
who
was
watching
Arthur
Stark
as
a
bonus.

Even
then,
that
couldn’t
replace
an
assistant.

The
Boltons
weren’t
good
for
much
beyond
simple
tasks.

Maybe
the
Starks
had
it
right
with
two
people
to
do
the
work
of
the
Law.
Perhaps
he
had
gone
too
far.

Maybe
he
should
have
stayed
in
poliNcs
instead
of
trying
to
do
both
poliNcs
and
law
at
the
same
Nme.

Maybe
arresNng
Will
for
Sansa’s
murder
hadn’t
been
necessary.

He
could
have
just
as
easily
arrested
one
of
the
others.

For
plumbbob’s
sake,
why
did
they
have
to
kill
her
in
the
first
place?

They
were
supposed
to
be
too
nice
to
bloody
their
hands.

True,
Piper
had
planned
for
it,
but
it
would
have
been
so
much
less
messy
the
other
way.

Except
for
having
Sansa
yapping
in
his
ear
about
her
delusions
of
grandeur.

  79. 79. No.

Piper
had
to
go
this
far.

He
had
to
keep
going.

As
long
as
the
Starks
were
around,
they
would
try
to
stop
him.

They
always
had.

They
would
throw
around
the
weight
of
their
family
name
to
shut
down
any
idea
that
came
out
of
his
mouth.

Brandon
Stark
had
never
listened
to
Piper
if
he
could
help
it.
The
plan
could
sNll
succeed,
he
told
himself.

Their
heir
might
not
be
broken,
but
he
was
on
the
run
and
in
disgrace.

The
Boltons
would
find
Will
eventually.

Once
they
did,
it
would
all
be
over.



  80. 80. Someone
knocked.

Who
was
it?

Then
he
remembered
that
Ellen
was
supposed
to
report.

“Come
in.”
She
entered
and
closed
the
door.
Piper
asked
the
quesNon
that
he
always
opened
with:
“Have
you
found
him?”


  81. 81. “No.

I’ve
tried
the
Amanas,
the
Fitzhughs—“
“And
is
Kevin
watching
the
Stark
house
now?”
“Yes.”
“Good.

ConNnue.”

  82. 82. “We’ve
tried
the
Amanas,
the
Fitzhughs,
and
the
Morgans,”
Ellen
conBnued.

“No
sign
of
Will
anywhere.

They
all
denied
having
seen
him.”


  83. 83. “And
you
believed
them.

See
if
the
wires
turn
up
anything.

Did
you
try
the
simselves?”
“When
I
went
to
their
house,
they
started
going
on
about
interdimensional
law.”
Did
she
have
any
spine?

“Simselves
have
no
authority
to
refuse
to
cooperate
with
law
enforcement.

What
are
they
going
to
do?

Drag
me
into
interdimensional
court?

Search
their
house
anyway.”


  84. 84. “Fine,”
she
said.
“And
start
searching
all
the
houses.

You
don’t
have
to
wire
them
up
like
you
did
the
others.

Just
search.

I
don’t
care
if
they’ve
ever
had
anything
to
do
with
Will
or
the
Stark
family.

I
want
you
to
find
him.”
“Piper—”
“I
believe
those
were
sufficiently
clear
instrucNons.

I
have
a
press
conference.

If
you
need
more
help,
I’ll
be
back
aVerwards.”

  85. 85. A
few
minutes
later,
Piper
surveyed
the
crowd.

Well,
at
least
Ursula
Fitzhugh
was
missing.

But
there
were
sNll
too
many
people
present.

Priya
Ramaswami
was
sNll
there
represenNng
the
feckless
Winterfell
Times.

She
wouldn’t
report
on
anything.

Piper
might
even
be
able
to
bring
her
in.

But
who
was
the
teenage
boy
sibng
in
the
middle?

And—simselves.

Three
simselves
in
the
front
row.


  86. 86. “Good
aVernoon,”
he
addressed
them.

“The
fugiNve
Will
Stark
is
sNll
at
large.

As
you
recall,
he
was
taken
into
custody
five
days
ago
for
the
murder
of
Sansa
Stark.

RegreMably,
he
escaped
three
days
ago.

If
you
see—“
Then,
Piper
had
to
duck
to
avoid
gebng
hit
in
the
head
by
a
baseball.

  87. 87. When
he
looked
up,
he
saw
the
teenager
glaring
at
him.

“That’s
for
scaring
my
mom!”
the
boy
yelled
before
running
from
the
room.

  88. 88. Piper
scanned
his
memory
for
anything
he
could
charge
the
kid
with.

Disorderly
conduct
would
do.

But
who
was
the
kid?

It
didn’t
maMer
now.

Keep
talking.
“We
are
conducNng
a
city‐wide
manhunt
for
Mr.
Stark.

Photographs
of
him
are
being
distributed
to
all
your
homes.

If
you
see
a
dark‐skinned
man,
a
liMle
taller
than
average,
with
about
chin‐length
red
hair,
keep
tabs
on
him
and
call
law
enforcement.

Do
not
approach
him.

He
is
extremely
dangerous.”

  89. 89. Should
he
menNon
the
home
visits?

No.

That
might
warn
Will.

“I
urge
you
all
to
fully
cooperate
with
law
enforcement
in
this
invesNgaNon.

Remember
that
we
need
your
assistance
to
make
Winterfell
a
safer
community.

My
work
in
this
office
is
nothing
without
your
help.
“No
quesNons
today.”

Who
knew
what
the
simselves
might
say?

“Have
a
good
aVernoon.”

  90. 90. Lily
rose
from
her
chair.

“Interdimensional
law—“
“I
said,
no
quesNons,”
Piper
interrupted.
“Not
a
quesNon.

There
is
an
interdimensional
court.

And
they
don’t
tend
to
assume
you’re
innocent
over
there.

Look
up
what
happened
to
Joe
Grundstrom
someNme.”

  91. 91. “Joe—I
don’t
care
who
he
is.

You
live
here.

You’re
subject
to
my
law.

You
should
concern
yourself
with
whether
you’re
complying
with
it.”

They
had
to
be
hiding
something
in
that
house.

“Goodbye,
Miss
Simself.”


  92. 92. ValenNne
liked
to
think
that
she
was
always
in
the
know.

She
wasn’t
Meg,
but
she
had
her
ear
to
the
ground,
and
she
knew
that
people
liked
to
say
things
when
she
was
around.

When
they
saw
pigtails
and
a
preMy
pink
dress,
they
didn’t
think
that
the
girl
wearing
them
had
a
mind
of
her
own.

They
didn’t
think
she
would
turn
out
to
be
anything
but
totally
nice.
But
that
didn’t
mean
she
understood
everything
that
she
heard.

Like,
if
her
mom
wanted
to
be
a
policewoman,
and
the
people
who
came
to
the
house
were
also
police,
then
why
was
her
mom
scared
of
them?

  93. 93. “Just
because
people
are
cops
doesn’t
mean
they’re
good,”
BriMany
explained.

“Actually,
a
lot
of
them
are
bad.”
“Like
the
ones
who
wanted
to
look
at
our
house?”
ValenNne
asked.
“Yes.”

“Why
are
so
many
of
them
bad?“

  94. 94. “Because
it’s
roMen
at
the
core.

The
Law
is
bad,
so
the
people
who
enforce
the
law
are
also
going
to
be
mean.

He’s
not
even
supposed
to
be
the
Law,”
BriMany
told
her.

“Your
cousins
were
supposed
to
do
it.”

“The
grown‐up
ones?”
“Right.”


  95. 95. “But
he
killed
that
woman,”
ValenNne
said.
“No.”

BriMany
shook
her
head.

“Will
was
never
going
to
be
the
Law.

And
he
never
killed
anybody,
ValenBne.”
“Then
who
did?

Because
kids
at
school
are
saying
he
did
it.”

  96. 96. BriMany
shook
her
head.

She
didn’t
like
to
think
of
Julian
as
a
killer.

She
didn’t
want
to
teach
ValenNne
that
murder
was
okay.

“I
don’t
know.

But
Will’s
innocent.

That
poster
they
sent
around
isn’t
true.”
“Maybe
they
made
the
whole
thing
up!”
ValenNne
proposed.

“Because
they’re
mean
liars!”
“They
did.”
BriMany
nodded.

“And
that’s
why
you
have
to
be
careful
around
any
of
them.

Will’s
innocent,
and
he’s
coming
back,
but
we
have
to
pretend
that
he’s
not
while
all
of
them
are
around.”

  97. 97. “So
what
if
they
ask
you
to
do
something
bad
when
you
don’t
want
to?”
ValenNne
asked.
BriMany
thought
about
it.

“Depends
on
how
bad.

I
sNll
haven’t
given
up
on
working
for
them
aVer
you
and
Carla
are
old
enough.

I’ve
always
wanted
to
be
a
policewoman,
and
I
can’t
change
that.

But
the
Starks
are
the
only
other
family
we
have.

I
can’t
turn
on
them.”

  98. 98. Unfortunately,
they
hadn’t
been
careful
enough.

  99. 99. A
few
hours
later,
Meg
walked
up
to
the
Amana
house
and
rang
the
doorbell.

She
had
been
pubng
this
off,
but
it
was
Nme
to
tell
ValenNne.


  100. 100. ValenNne
came
outside
and
gave
her
a
hug.

“Hi!

I
didn’t
think
I’d
see
you
today!”
“I
wanted
to
come
over
and
say
hi
before
your
birthday,”
Meg
answered,
hugging
her
back.

“I
can’t
believe
you’re
almost
a
teenager!”
“Me
neither!

I
want
you
to
grow
up
with
me.

You’re
my
best
friend.”

  101. 101. “You’re
my
best
friend,
too.”

Meg’s
smile
widened.

She
had
a
best
friend!

It
didn’t
maMer
whether
Gemma
liked
her
or
not
now,
because
ValenNne
Amana
was
her
best
friend.

And
it
was
happening
just
as
she
had
seen
it!

The
universe
could
be
so
out
of
joint
someNmes.

Things
that
didn’t
make
sense
happened
daily.

But
whenever
an
event
happened
according
to
Meg’s
foresight,
she
felt
the
world
snap
back
into
its
proper
order,
as
if
her
fragmented
vision
formed
a
complete
whole.

A
lot
of
Nmes,
the
proper
order
of
things
wasn’t
fair.

  102. 102. At
the
chess
table,
Meg
scratched
her
forehead.

“I
have
to
talk
about
your
future.”
“You
couldn’t
have
told
me
that
people
were
coming
to
search
my
house?"
ValenNne
asked
her.

“Or
that
the
teacher
was
going
to
yell
at
me
for
talking
in
class?”

  103. 103. “I
didn’t
see
that.

I
don’t
see
everything.

But
I
know
you
were—or
will
be
hiding
upstairs
with
Carla.

You
looked
scared.

And
you
were
a
teenager.”
“Did
I
have
good
clothes?”
ValenNne
asked.
“How
am
I
supposed
to
remember
what
you
were
wearing?”

  104. 104. “Meg,
this
is
important.

If
I
was
in
a
chicken
suit
or
some
kind
of
goth
thing,
I’d
want
to
know.”
“I
thought
it
was
more
important
to
tell
you
something
scary
was
happening,”
Meg
said.
“But
you
don’t
know
what
was
going
on,
do
you?”
ValenNne
asked.

  105. 105. “No,”
Meg
told
her.
“It
just
feels
bad.”
“Great.”
ValenNne
looked
at
the
chessboard.

“I’m
going
to
be
hiding
upstairs,
and
I
don’t
even
know
why
so
I
can
change
it.”
“You
can’t
change
it.”
“Then
why
are
you
telling
me?”
Meg
frowned.

“I
thought
you
wanted
to
know.”

  106. 106. While
Meg
played
chess
with
ValenNne,
Gemma
played
Mary
Mack
with
Nymeria
Fitzhugh.
“I
like
your
house,”
Nymeria
said.
“Why?”
Gemma
asked.

“I
bet
you
it’s
just
like
your
house.”

  107. 107. “It’s…it’s
just
cool.”
Nymeria
wondered
what
it
was
like
to
live
here.

Her
mom
had
told
her
that
her
other
dad
(not
the
one
who
taught
her
to
walk,
but
the
one
who
she
didn’t
remember)
used
to
live
in
this
house
before
the
police
lied
about
him
killing
someone
and
took
him
away.

The
people
in
the
house
were
her
family,
just
like
her
mom
and
dad
and
baby
brother.


“Yeah,
it
is.

Want
to
see
the
mahjong
table?”
“Yeah!”
Nymeria
exclaimed.

  108. 108. They
went
upstairs,
where
Jan
was
holding
Lyra
and
talking
to
her
about
something
that
sounded
science‐y.

“Are
you
Gemma’s
friend?”
she
asked.
Nymeria
nodded.
“I’m
Nymeria.”
“I’m
Gemma’s
mom.

Lyra
and
Lirael
are
growing
up
tonight,”
Jan
reminded
Gemma.

“Can
you
stay
for
cake,
Ny—“
“Nai‐meria,”
she
sounded
out.

“I
have
to
go
home
before
it’s
dark.”

  109. 109. In
the
next
room,
they
saw
Sabriel
typing
on
the
computer.
“What
are
you
working
on?”
Gemma
asked.

“Can
I
help?”

“Finishing
the
consNtuNon,”
Sabriel
answered.

She
looked
away
from
the
computer.
“It
should
be
ready
to
go
out
tonight.”
“Can
I
help?”
Gemma
repeated.

  110. 110. “Have
you
done
your
homework?”
Sabriel
asked.
“No.

I
just
got
home.”
“Gemma,
you
need
to
do
your
homework
before
you
can
help
me,”
Sabriel
told
her.


“But
Aunt
Sabriel—“

  111. 111. “And
it’s
not
nice
to
bring
people
back
to
your
house
to
play
and
then
ignore
them,”
Sabriel
conNnued.

“A
couple
of
red
hands
games,
birthdays,
and
homework.

Then
you
can
help
me
with
the
spelling.”
“But
I
don’t
want
to
help
with
spelling!

I
can
write!”
Sabriel
tried
to
put
this
in
a
way
that
her
niece
could
understand.

“Proofreading
is
important,
Gemma.

Think
about
how
stupid
it’d
look
if
it
went
out
with
a
bunch
of
spelling
mistakes.

Now,
why
don’t
you
play
with
your
friend?”
Gemma
didn’t
have
any
friends,
as
far
as
Sabriel
could
tell.

Maybe
a
friend
would
help
her.


  112. 112. ValenNne
decided
that
being
a
teenager
had
stopped
being
fun
once
her
mom
had
decided
it
meant
she
was
old
enough
to
take
care
of
the
baby.

At
least
Carla
was
finally
toilet
trained,
but
her
sister
sNll
wasn’t
finished
learning
how
to
talk,
and
ValenNne
didn’t
want
to
play
charisma
bunny
with
her.


  113. 113. She
put
on
a
happy
face.

“It’s
okay,
Carla.

You
don’t
have
to
cry.”
The
toddler
kept
on
shrieking.

ValenNne
liVed
her
from
the
crib.

How
was
the
kid
so
heavy?
“Come
on,
want
to
play—“
The
doorbell
rang.

ValenNne’s
thoughts
flashed
to
Meg’s
vision.

The
nursery.

With
Carla.

Scared.

What
was
about
to
happen?

She
decided
to
stay
in
the
nursery
and
listen,
if
she
could
with
Carla
shrieking.

  114. 114. “Mrs.
Amana.”

Piper
walked
in
without
so
much
as
a
by‐your‐leave.

“You
have
a
lovely
home.”
“Thank
you,”
BriMany
said.

“Er—why—what
brings
you
here?”

  115. 115. “To
discuss
your
potenNal
candidacy
as
a
member
of
Winterfell’s
police
force.”

Piper
smiled.

“Given
your
childcare
responsibiliNes,
I
thought
it
would
be
best
to
have
this
meeNng
at
your
home.”
“I—“
That
made
sense,
and
yet
at
the
same
Nme,
it
didn’t.

How
had
he
found
out
she
wanted
to
join
the
police?

  116. 116. “For
the
most
part,
you
seem
like
a
good
candidate,
Mrs.
Amana.

ConscienNous.

CommiMed
to
changing
Winterfell
for
the
beMer.

But
I
have
one
major
concern:
your
loyalty.”
“Why?”

“I
should
have
thought
it
obvious.

Your
family.”

  117. 117. BriMany
didn’t
say
anything.

She
was
caught
between
wondering
how
Piper
knew
and
quesNoning
her
lifeNme
ambiNon
to
enter
the
police
force.

Could
she
possibly
do
good
from
within
a
group
as
bad
as
this?

“What
about
them?”
“You
do
believe
Will
is
innocent.

Don’t
you?”
“I—“
She
hesitated.

  118. 118. “If
I
were
to
give
you
an
order
to
arrest
him,
would
you
do
it?”
What
if
she
said
no?

That
would
just
get
BriMany
and
her
children
further
into
trouble.
“Yes.”

  119. 119. “Good.

Now,
I
won’t
be
giving
you
any
orders
to
arrest
him.

But
I
will
need
you
to
keep
an
eye
on
his
family
for
me
and
report
back.

Can
you
do
that?”
She
nodded.
“Then
welcome
to
the
police
force,
Mrs.
Amana.”


  120. 120. “Mr.
Morgan?”
The
pounding
came
on
the
door.


Jocelyn
opened
it.
“Mr.
Morgan?

What
do
you
want
with
my
son?”
“I
want
you
to
teach
him
beMer
manners,”
Ellen
Bolton
told
her.

“He
should
know
beMer
than
to
be
so
disrupNve
and
unruly.”

  121. 121. “What’s
going
on?”
Kay
asked,
entering
the
room.
“Kay,
what
did
you
do
at
the
press
conference
today?”
Jocelyn
asked
him.
“Kay
Morgan,
you’re
under
arrest
for
assault
and
disorderly
conduct.”

Ellen
handcuffed
Kay.

“Come
with
me.

A
night
in
lockup
might
teach
you
manners.”



  122. 122. “I’m
only
sorry
that
the
baseball
didn’t
hit
him!”
Kay
shouted
as
he
followed
Ellen
off.

  123. 123. Meanwhile,
Kevin
was
on
the
run.

AVer
three
hours
of
watching,
two
ghost
scares,
and
one
bladder
accident,
he
had
had
enough
of
Starks
for
the
night.

Someone
else
could
take
over.


  124. 124. Once
he
disappeared,
Ferd
and
Mag
walked
around
the
corner,
whistling.
“I
wish
we’d
goMen
to
try
the
new
bombs,
Ferd.”
“We
will,
Mag.

This
was
more
fun.”

  125. 125. They
opened
the
mailbox
and
siVed
their
way
through
the
papers,
leaving
the
bills
behind
and
picking
out
the
unmarked
manila
envelope
that
contained
the
copies
of
the
new
consNtuNon.

“Let’s
give
them
hell,”
they
both
said.

  126. 126. Next
Nme
on
An
Apocalypse
of
Ice:
+
Taking
an
interlude
from
the
Piper
plot
to
focus
on
a
big
problem
that
will
confront
gen
5.
+
Will
doesn’t
seMle
into
life
at
college
as
easily
as
he
had
hoped.
+
Heirship
announcement!


  127. 127. Guest
starring:
+
Ferdinand
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
India
VeNnari
(The
VeBnari
Dualegacy)
+
Magellan
Penguino
(The
Penguino
Legacy)
+
Spencer
Fitzhugh
(The
Fitzhugh
Legacy)
+
Teagan
Fitzhugh
(The
Morgan
Legacy)
+
Ursula
Fitzhugh
(A
Villainous
Apocalypse)
Thanks
to
Rose,
Pen,
and
De
for
helping
me
with
the
draV
of
this
chapter!

  128. 128. “WE
WON’T
HAVE
OUR
SNOWBALL
FIGHT
ON
THIS
SIDE
OF
THE
HOUSE!”
You
will
if
I
reload
the
game.
:P
Happy
Simming!


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